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Old Apr 28, 2007, 12:23 PM
Tekko is offline
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Revs the **** outta a ASP FS70
Heres my contribution to the cd-rom motor gallery: http://diymania.hv4all.com/motor%20c...%20cd%20motor/
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Old May 05, 2007, 08:34 AM
Tekko is offline
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Revs the **** outta a ASP FS70
Heres another cd-rom motor: http://diymania.hv4all.com/motor%20c...d-rom%20motor/

Note: i used the orig magnet ring because there are no magnets available that are small enough.
Old Aug 04, 2007, 07:30 PM
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discontinued video.
Last edited by manuel v; Mar 29, 2009 at 02:57 AM.
Old Aug 18, 2007, 11:43 AM
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Insulating Enamel for minor touch-ups and repairs / winding


I use Vanguard Insulating Enamel for repairs on stators, corners that appear to have a thin coating or chipped areas. Or wire that may have been scratched in order to prevent shorts. Also I use it for general insulation purposes anywhere in my electrics to prevent shorts. It's "class F" so it's good to 155 C (311 F) and it dries in about 10 - 15 minutes which is a plus. I usually apply it with a toothpick unless I need to coat a general area then I spray. If you do spray be sure to mask off you don't want coated first. I got mine at an electric motor repair shop. I asked them what they use and that's what they said they used. I believe there are other insulating coatings besides "Vanguard" also.

I have a question... Most winding diagrams on a 9 tooth stator show it being wound clockwise around a tooth and then skipping 2 teeth going in a clockwise direction and then winding the second tooth then skipping 2 more teeth then winding the third. If you wound clockwise around a tooth and then instead of going in a clockwise direction you travelled in a counterclockwise direction skipping 2 teeth winding the second tooth skipping 2 more teeth going counterclockwise then winding the third. Is there any implications for this? I ask this because this way the last winding on the tooth is "closed" vs being "open" if using the original method.
Old Aug 20, 2007, 05:24 PM
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AKA Don
Quote:
Originally Posted by xduggy
....
I have a question... Most winding diagrams on a 9 tooth stator show it being wound clockwise around a tooth and then skipping 2 teeth going in a clockwise direction and then winding the second tooth then skipping 2 more teeth then winding the third.

If you wound clockwise around a tooth and then instead of going in a clockwise direction you travelled in a counterclockwise direction skipping 2 teeth winding the second tooth skipping 2 more teeth going counterclockwise then winding the third. Is there any implications for this? I ask this because this way the last winding on the tooth is "closed" vs being "open" if using the original method.
Both ways work fine.
Don
Old Aug 20, 2007, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xduggy
I use Vanguard Insulating Enamel for repairs on stators, corners that appear to have a thin coating or chipped areas. Or wire that may have been scratched in order to prevent shorts. Also I use it for general insulation purposes anywhere in my electrics to prevent shorts. It's "class F" so it's good to 155 C (311 F) and it dries in about 10 - 15 minutes which is a plus. I usually apply it with a toothpick unless I need to coat a general area then I spray. If you do spray be sure to mask off you don't want coated first. I got mine at an electric motor repair shop. I asked them what they use and that's what they said they used. I believe there are other insulating coatings besides "Vanguard" also.

I have a question... Most winding diagrams on a 9 tooth stator show it being wound clockwise around a tooth and then skipping 2 teeth going in a clockwise direction and then winding the second tooth then skipping 2 more teeth then winding the third. If you wound clockwise around a tooth and then instead of going in a clockwise direction you travelled in a counterclockwise direction skipping 2 teeth winding the second tooth skipping 2 more teeth going counterclockwise then winding the third. Is there any implications for this? I ask this because this way the last winding on the tooth is "closed" vs being "open" if using the original method.
That's how I always do it because it completes the last turn so easily.
Old Aug 29, 2007, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron van Sommeren
Use a DC power supply with a current limiter to protect the ESC during first test runs. Batteries are hardly current limited, to say the least and may fry up the ESC if the newly wound motor has a short in it. If you don't have a power supply, put a heavy a car lamp or a duty resistor between the battery and the ESC. Use few cells that are almost empty. Even empty cells can deliver a lot of current for a very short period of time. However, this period is long enough to ruin your ESC.
I'm using a 25A car fuse between ESC and battery. If the current rises too much, the fuse blows, saving my ESC and battery. Easy and cheap.

Prop-er
Old Sep 11, 2007, 11:10 PM
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AKA Don
Jack,
I have nothing on that motor either but if it is 18T now and you want to raise the Kv reduce the turns. For practical purposes Kv*Turns = a constant for any motor configuration. That means a 9T motor will have a Kv double that of the 18T.
When you reduce turns you can use larger wire. Io will increase.
Have Fun!
Old Sep 12, 2007, 04:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by diceco
It would be great to be able to estimate what wire size and winding scheme I need given the desired motor parameters.

I have a GWS 2208/18T that I'd like to rewind. For one the factory windings appear to be poorly done and two, I'd like to make a motor with a higher Kv to put in a small high speed model.

I've found lots of info on wire sizes and winding types but nothing that relates this to the motor parameters Kv, Io, etc. It must be there, I just can't find it. Please help!

Thanks, Jack
The problem is that there are too many parameters - magnet size, shape, strength, coverage, airgap, and flux ring thickness all affect the Kv. Even differences in shape and material of the stator can affect it. Both of these stators are 23.8x4.5mm*, but 14t on the left one gives the same Kv as 12t on the right one. 17t on the right one is between 18 and 20t on the left one (closer to 20). The shape is only slightly different, no idea on the materials.

Good Luck!

* The one on the right is actually a hair smaller (just enough so the cans won't interchange), but gives lower Kv for the number of turns.
Old Sep 15, 2007, 06:54 AM
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homo ludens modellisticus
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Excellent dlrk winding turorial
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=736580
Old Sep 15, 2007, 07:05 AM
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homo ludens modellisticus
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Stator insulation in pictures:
http://www.baronerosso.net/forum/sho...09&postcount=5
Old Sep 21, 2007, 10:58 AM
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homo ludens modellisticus
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Coils in parallel instead of in series
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=745288
Old Sep 30, 2007, 05:29 PM
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Only for test motor.
Old Feb 17, 2008, 11:23 AM
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Checking LRK winding polarity


I use a compass to check if the LRK windings (clockwise and anticlockwise) are correct. If they are correct, one tooth will attract the white part of the indicator on the compass, the other tooth (with the same current) will attract the other, the red part of the indicator on the compass.

Peter
Old Mar 26, 2008, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eljimb0
Put the shaft in an electric drill.
Spin it.
Carefully hold a small hacksaw blade or file against the shaft.
(you made first need to heat the shaft end to "red-hot" to destroy the hardness of the metal)
good luck!
jimbo
Better to make use of the extra thin Dremmel (roto tool) grinding disks for this job.
More precise and less heat and trouble.


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