FlySky / Turnigy iA6 (and iA6B) voltage telemetry mod - Page 11 - RC Groups
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Nov 25, 2016, 06:43 PM
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Oh come on , it's the most logical way ever: you just hold down Cancel
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Nov 25, 2016, 10:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by triibutu
No, the pins stay the same. You need to make just one cut to separate the vbat input from vcc and solder an extra wire to the board, then provide battery voltage via that wire. Similar to iA6B, not iA6.
Ok, I finally got the time to attempt the mod today, and well let's just say that you should get ready for a story

Prying it open, at first cutting, then finally using my soldering iron to isolate the pin was the easy part, even if it took a surprisingly long time
Then, I went to go do the "test point" with resistor that you suggested. Finding the resistor, easy. Tinning the resistor, easy. Cleaning the pad with flux, easy. Attaching the resistor to the pad, incredibly difficult!

After finally getting the solder blob in the correct place, with the resistor attached, I relaxed and moved the iron away some inches. BUT, this movement caused a tremor in my left hand, and promptly cause the resistor to flick the nearly cooled solder from the pad onto the legs of the receiver's integrated circuit

By the time I got there, the damage was done... On one side of the IC two legs were soldered together, and on the other FIVE were connected. Now, I am a 15 year old with pretty good eyes and even I could barely discern where the individual legs were. BUT, there was fixing up to do, so that's what I did. A half hour later, the side with the FIVE soldered legs was cleaned up. I have soldering wick and tried to use that to clean up the mess, BUT of course it didnt work correctly...

Apparently, the temperature needed to melt the solder sufficiently enough to make it crawl up the solder wick was high enough to cause the tiny legs of the IC to lift up from their pads! So, I ended up turning my iron up to 430 degrees celsius and flicking the solder that was in between the legs (less than a mm gap) out of there, before using compressed air to get rid of the minute flecks this process created. Of course, though, everything was now going MUCH to smoothly to be true. SO, the pencil tip on the iron I was using decided to quit, and the bottom part broke off!

Ahh, what fun those 30 minutes were... Anyhow, I managed to get the side with five fused legs taken care of, and moved to the one with only the bottommost two connected. Of course, now I couldn't use my "flicking" tactic again due to the broken pencil tip on the soldering iron. So, being the brilliant person I am, I decided to melt the solder, and then use compressed air to blow it of the legs. Of course, this only served blew it away ON TOP OFF a third adjacent leg, and... bla, bla, bla...

Long story short, I was able to get everything cleaned up except for the two bottommost legs that solder or not, fused together on the left hand side of the IC. Picture below.

Question is, what more permanent problems have I created for myself by messing up so badly: well, from what I can tell nothing is broken except that my receiver voltage is now, rather ironically, resting at 12.7 volts instead of 5.
Do you or does anyone else by any chance, know where to get the schematic for the particular IC found on the ia10b or ia6b? It would be very useful in seeing what other problems may arise from the accident, and also what the best fix for correcting the voltage may be.

Fully intending to continue the mod, Nicolas
Nov 26, 2016, 09:31 AM
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Well, you didn't need to solder the resistor there, just touch it and check the reported voltage on TX.
If the receiver still works, chances are that no real damage was done. Try to separate the two legs and you should be back on square one.
The datasheet for the chip you can find on STM's site (GIYF), but what the particular pins do, depends on the firmware, no way to find that out from any schematics.
But since the short affects the voltage reading, it's pretty sure the vbat input is indeed correct. Just that shorted with another pin it is pulled up all the time.
Nov 27, 2016, 03:42 PM
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Voltage Mod for A10B Receiver


Hello everyone.

I am expecting my iA10B receiver to arrive any time now (ordered a month ago) and want to mod it to port out my 3S flight battery voltage, using the information in this thread.

What I intend to do is isolate the centre (former +5V) pin of the bind position. Please correct me if I am on the wrong track, but I think the actual bind process just shorts the signal position to the ground, and this centre pin is not needed if the 5V is being supplied on another channel. To use it for the remote reading of flight battery voltage I must scratch away the two trace connections which connect the former plus pin to the rest of the board.

The next job is to solder a small insulated wire to the pin I just isolated and connect the other end of this wire to the proper solder point on the board. This point has been reading the 5V BEC voltage and the trace must be cut to remove that voltage source.

Below on the left is a picture of the easy mod done on a iA10 receiver (not my model) which shows the trace which must be cut and the pad onto which the flight battery voltage wire should be soldered

The 1A10B receiver has a different PCB and seems a little more difficult to make the proper connection. There was a photo earlier in this thread which showed the suggested connection and trace cut as on the right below.

Before I cut and solder things can someone verify that the question marks on this photo are not needed?

One additional thought. If, after making the cut as shown on the right picture, the receiver voltage transmitter display changes to zero, wouldn't that be a confirmation that we are on the right track?
Last edited by Barry Smythe; Dec 01, 2016 at 09:50 PM.
Dec 03, 2016, 12:32 AM
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Hello Barry Smyth,
Yeah, you're doing pretty much the exact same thing as I and I can confirm that you're on the right track.
One question though, in the picture uploaded there is an arrow with a red line that says "cut here". However, there is NO trace where we are told to cut, only one on either side??
Which one of the circled traces should be cut?
Last edited by Gouada; Dec 03, 2016 at 02:51 PM. Reason: Grammar
Dec 03, 2016, 10:34 AM
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Which one of the circled traces should I cut?


Since my comments on the 10B voltage mod have all been made to clarify the task, we must look to the brains on the subject, Triibutu, for his advice.

After 35 days I am still waiting for my receiver to arrive from Banggood, so cannot comment from first hand examination of the board,

Triibutu, can you help?
Last edited by Barry Smythe; Dec 03, 2016 at 12:21 PM.
Dec 03, 2016, 04:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gouada
there is NO trace where we are told to cut, only one on either side??
Which one of the circled traces should be cut?
To me it looks like you're confusing the lighter green copper traces with the darker bare board areas?
In any case, the vbat input shall go on the end of the resistor where the red arrow is ponting and that same end of the resistor first needs to be separated from the rest of the circuit, or the magic smoke will come out from somewhere.
Dec 04, 2016, 02:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by triibutu
To me it looks like you're confusing the lighter green copper traces with the darker bare board areas?
In any case, the vbat input shall go on the end of the resistor where the red arrow is ponting and that same end of the resistor first needs to be separated from the rest of the circuit, or the magic smoke will come out from somewhere.
Wait, you mean that the copper traces are the lighter green parts of the PCB? If so, then the marked cutting point makes sense.

& Yes, I'll first cut the input resistor and solder vbat to its right hand side. Thanks for the help!
Dec 05, 2016, 05:35 PM
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Yes the copper is lighter green. Once you take a knife and start scratching, you'll see
And don't "cut the input resistor", you'll need it.
Dec 08, 2016, 10:04 PM
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Hey guys I have successfully done the mod on the ia10B a few days ago. U guys are going on the right direction. We need to cut total 3 traces. I'll post the pics some time later, today.
Last edited by Tesla99; Dec 08, 2016 at 10:10 PM.
Dec 09, 2016, 08:55 AM
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iA10B mod


These are the modifications i did on the ia10b. i have tested it with 3s battery and it shows 0.10v less than the actual value of the lipo pack.
U need to pry open the "plastic" of the servo leads to cut the trace under it. after all the 3 cuts join the particular side of the resistor to the isolated Vcc pin of the bind plug with a thin wire.
Dec 09, 2016, 07:59 PM
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Thanks to Triibutu and Tesla99


Many thanks to Triibutu for using your electronics knowledge to eyeball the PCB photo, without even having the board itself, and posting instructions for the voltage mod on the A10B.

Thanks also to Tesla99 for being the first to make the mod and tell us on this blog. There was no magic smoke.
Dec 09, 2016, 11:30 PM
expert noob
handyfella's Avatar
I did this today on the ia6 accuracy is fantastic, at 11.6v it reports about .2v high, at 8v it is almost exact according to my trusty dmm.

I just used the easy and quick method of tacking a wire on the bottom pad that says bat + and cutting between the pad and the + connector post thru hole connection. Took about 5 minutes.

Top that with a $44 radio!!
Dec 10, 2016, 11:14 AM
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so i have a ia6b and i want to get rid of the Dipoles because i keep smashing them in my props and breaking props with them. (damn gemfans)

can i just lop them off and unsheeth 29mm of the center to get normal antennas or do i need to unsolder the metal bits that are smashing my props?
Dec 11, 2016, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by templar90
can i just lop them off and unsheeth 29mm of the center to get normal antennas or do i need to unsolder the metal bits that are smashing my props?
Works the same either way. Range will be less, but if you're smashing them in props, it's probably not your long range craft anyway


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