Thread Tools
Apr 25, 2015, 04:25 PM
Just say "No, it's under 250g"
scottyo's Avatar
Thread OP
Idea

Unique 3D-Printed Profile Foamy Motor Mount


I got this idea from a guy I fly indoors with sometimes. He mounts his motors on profile foamies by using four lengths of plastic tubing glued to the sides of the foam at the nose and then screwing the motor mount to that.

I'm getting into 3D printing, and I thought "Hey, I can come up with something like that to print on my new printer". So I got out OpenSCAD and came up with this mount. It's configurable for different size motors and different thicknesses of foam.

I posted the STL and SCAD files (with instructions) at Thingiverse at:
http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:793177

I just finished the model design this morning, and I can't get to my printer till Monday, so I haven't printed it yet. But I'll post some shots of the CAD files here - I thought somebody might be interested in printing one before Monday...

(If you do, please let me know how it goes.)
Scotty
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Apr 25, 2015, 05:07 PM
Just say "No, it's under 250g"
scottyo's Avatar
Thread OP
By the way, if you have a 3D printer, but haven't modified/configured a design before - don't worry, it's pretty easy:

1. Download and install OpenSCAD (free for all platforms).
2. Start OpenSCAD and "Open" the .scad file.
3. Make your measurements and edit the parameters as needed. There are only 4 and they are at the top of the file (with instructions).
4. "Render" the model (hover over the buttons until you see "Render" or just hit F6). It takes a couple of minutes to render.
5. Export the model as STL (hover over the buttons again to see which one it is).
6. Transfer the .stl file to whatever software you use to prepare for printing.

That's it - good luck!
Scotty
Apr 25, 2015, 07:14 PM
Laughs at un-boxing videos...
basicguy's Avatar
I have been making mounts by screwing into the ends of sections of 1/4" dowel very similar to your design.

I use white gorilla glue to foam-in the dowel rods to adjacent chassis parts while still attached to the motor.

The good aspect of the way that I do it is that it doesn't require any hardware or software to make it.
Apr 25, 2015, 09:48 PM
Just say "No, it's under 250g"
scottyo's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by basicguy View Post
I have been making mounts by screwing into the ends of sections of 1/4" dowel very similar to your design.

I use white gorilla glue to foam-in the dowel rods to adjacent chassis parts while still attached to the motor.

The good aspect of the way that I do it is that it doesn't require any hardware or software to make it.
Yeah, that's what my friend does, except with push-rod guide tubing. I actually just tape a lot of my motors on using fiber-reinforced tape. I just thought it would be cool to "print" a mount since I now have the equipment (and I guessed a few others might already have printers as well). And I thought I would try to design something to give a bit more protection to the foam at the nose (even though it weighs a bit more than just 4 small tubes or dowels).
Dec 09, 2016, 07:52 AM
Retired CAD guy
birdofplay's Avatar
check out this one ...
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...postcount=1251
Dec 11, 2016, 08:40 AM
Registered User
rajazo's Avatar
As expert breaking motor mounts thanks to my brute style of landing(lol) I suggest scottyo take the birdofprey way because his design has lot of contact surface to glue the motor mount to the foam in the shorter length of contact. Same surface of contact in a inserted piece on the foam needs more length and , in my case, a hard land or nose crash will compromise more fuselage.

The other threat posted a bangood motor mount similar to birdofprey's design but the disc base like more because it could be reused more times in the event of one or more holes fail with over turned screw... just needs more holes in a reinforced ring perfectly possible to make with any 3d print.
Dec 12, 2016, 01:13 PM
Crash,fly,crash again....
You should patent this design. I've heard about some people whose ideas had been stolen by big companies.


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools