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Dec 16, 2015, 02:26 PM
Free Bird
blade strike's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by sno
Regarding the follow me down a ski hill. Lots of ski areas are now "no drone zones".
I know they are banned at my local mountain.
Yep same here
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Dec 16, 2015, 03:05 PM
Bog Flusher Platinum Grade
Mad_angler1's Avatar
My mountain has no restriction, it also does not have snow ,

Lots and lots of sheep though 😉
Latest blog entry: Herelink 600mw Mod
Dec 16, 2015, 03:16 PM
It's all about the image
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad_angler1
In the mean time I would put the packs on charge and see how long it takes to get to the 3rd light flashing.

Before you fly make sure you fully charge the battery and don't fly a partly charged pack it's just not worth it.

More battery info here

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2542458

This is an area I'm just now encountering since my batteries are now coming out of the break-in period.

I went flying yesterday (Tues) but I hadn't flown since Sat. So I had 3 batteries fully charged. Your recommendation is to bring it down to 90% and then recharge. Well that took about 4 hours. I put each battery on the quad and simply turned on the quad, no motors. It took an hour each to bring it down to 87%. Then it takes about 30-40 minutes to bring back up to 100%.

I flew yesterday and I thought, I should just keep the batteries in their 20-50% state until I'm ready to go again. Then I don't have to take an hour long hit on each to discharge them. I further thought, well, I wonder if I can precharge them to 50-75% and then do the final 25%before I fly.

So, what's the recommendation after using a battery if you aren't sure you'll fly for a few days?
Dec 16, 2015, 03:19 PM
Free Bird
blade strike's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneDiego
This is an area I'm just now encountering since my batteries are now coming out of the break-in period.

I went flying yesterday (Tues) but I hadn't flown since Sat. So I had 3 batteries fully charged. Your recommendation is to bring it down to 90% and then recharge. Well that took about 4 hours. I put each battery on the quad and simply turned on the quad, no motors. It took an hour each to bring it down to 87%. Then it takes about 30-40 minutes to bring back up to 100%.

I flew yesterday and I thought, I should just keep the batteries in their 20-50% state until I'm ready to go again. Then I don't have to take an hour long hit on each to discharge them. I further thought, well, I wonder if I can precharge them to 50-75% and then do the final 25%before I fly.

So, what's the recommendation after using a battery if you aren't sure you'll fly for a few days?
I leave them at landing voltage ... 20% isn't bad for a week or two...
Dec 16, 2015, 03:28 PM
What goes up, hopefully lands!
Repaid1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneDiego
This is an area I'm just now encountering since my batteries are now coming out of the break-in period.

I went flying yesterday (Tues) but I hadn't flown since Sat. So I had 3 batteries fully charged. Your recommendation is to bring it down to 90% and then recharge. Well that took about 4 hours. I put each battery on the quad and simply turned on the quad, no motors. It took an hour each to bring it down to 87%. Then it takes about 30-40 minutes to bring back up to 100%.

I flew yesterday and I thought, I should just keep the batteries in their 20-50% state until I'm ready to go again. Then I don't have to take an hour long hit on each to discharge them. I further thought, well, I wonder if I can precharge them to 50-75% and then do the final 25%before I fly.

So, what's the recommendation after using a battery if you aren't sure you'll fly for a few days?
I'm thinking you didn't get that quite correct...when you wanted to bring the batteries to 90% you should have powered the props and done a short hop...even just letting them sit at idle would have been preferred over just letting the thing sit.

If your still in break in, just leave them at 50% till you are ready to fly again. Charge the night before if you have to, and once again put on charger a hour or less before your flight(s) and go fly.

It's okay to charge them to 100% and not fly for about a week or so, if that might be the case set your auto discharge to 5 days (Don't check them during that time) Other wise if you charged them to 100% and fly say 3 days later then just top them off the day your going to fly...you should have no issues.

Once ready to go for a whole battery after the 10 or so 50% drains just enjoy the flight times. After about 10 flights down to about 10% charge batteries to 100% let them sit for about a hour and then drain them down to 3.3V on your Go App Display...Allow to cool for at least a hour or longer to stabilize and charge them back to 100% to calibrate the battery firmware.

Rinse and repeat the draining process about every 15 to 20 flights to keep things in check
Dec 16, 2015, 03:31 PM
Bog Flusher Platinum Grade
Mad_angler1's Avatar

Official Phantom 3 Professional / Advanced ***Owner's Thread*** First post h...


Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneDiego
This is an area I'm just now encountering since my batteries are now coming out of the break-in period.



I went flying yesterday (Tues) but I hadn't flown since Sat. So I had 3 batteries fully charged. Your recommendation is to bring it down to 90% and then recharge. Well that took about 4 hours. I put each battery on the quad and simply turned on the quad, no motors. It took an hour each to bring it down to 87%. Then it takes about 30-40 minutes to bring back up to 100%.



I flew yesterday and I thought, I should just keep the batteries in their 20-50% state until I'm ready to go again. Then I don't have to take an hour long hit on each to discharge them. I further thought, well, I wonder if I can precharge them to 50-75% and then do the final 25%before I fly.



So, what's the recommendation after using a battery if you aren't sure you'll fly for a few days?

As Blade says far better to leave at 20% than full for a week or two, any longer try to get them to 40-60%

When I posted to discharge you could fly it down hover for a few minutes in the garden or something, the concern is flying over something you don't have control over or great distance.

You should have no issue just hovering a few feet off the ground for a few minutes to get them down.

These recommendations are just to try and prevent any chance of problems especially in colder weather , but you have to take realty into account, taking 4 hours to discharge is far from ideal for anyone.

The whole idea of the post was to make people think before they fly, do what works for you around those steps.

What we want to ensure is people don't get issues.

Latest blog entry: Herelink 600mw Mod
Dec 16, 2015, 04:07 PM
Suspended Account
i do not want to derail this fine thread,but I see nowhere else to ask the question. What is DJI'S stance on the new FAA registration requirements?
Dec 16, 2015, 04:15 PM
Registered User
Setting a "storage charge" of 50% at least with my batts is bang-on what "Mad"
said a few posts ago - as soon as that 3rd LED begins to flash (and you have to watch it like a hawk). you'll be at exactly a perfect 50%. That's good for charging "up" - draining down to 50 I back-yard hover or if weather is an issue I safely and carefully run it props on at idle speed watching the batt drop on the Dji app.
Be oh so gentle on that throttle stick !!!
Dec 16, 2015, 06:32 PM
Suspended Account
Such bad advice being given about batteries.

Leave them at 20% for a week? Sure if you get lots of free ones to replace the ruined batteries you'll have after a few dozen cycles of that treatment.

And I can't believe anyone fell for that nonsense about discharging them to 90% then back up again "just in case".

The very, very, very worst thing anyone can be doing is flying them down until they shut off by hovering them until they land.

If you really want to go through the totally unnecessary 'calibration' dance you should fly it down to no less than 20%, then land it, then let it sit there and gently discharge under no load until it shuts off, or better still: stop it yourself at no less than 3.5v per cell. Then let it cool and charge it up to 60%, or about 25 minutes on the charger, 3rd LED starting to blink.

Then store it until you want to fly it and charge it up to 100%. When you come back from flying, charge up to 60% again and store it again.

Some people are just ruining their batteries by following some of the daftest advice I've ever read about LiPos.

The whole 'calibration' procedure done wrongly is the perfect way to ruin batteries. You would never fly an aircraft on any other LiPo that low. People who fly with large, expensive, high quality 'dumb' LiPos never, ever, ever take them down below 40%, and they last a long, long time.
Dec 16, 2015, 06:33 PM
It's all about the image
First of all, thank you for all the (quick) battery tips. Very much appreciated. Let me address a couple of items.

My break-in is basically complete. 2 batteries are done, the 3rd just needs two more flights. Yeah. Fly my first full battery yesterday. A wonderful 21 minutes down to about 23% or so.

>> Other wise if you charged them to 100% and fly say 3 days later then just top them off the day your going to fly...you should have no issues.

I just reread the Battery Guide and I thought I had read that if the battery was 95%+ that you couldn't top it off. Or actually, maybe it was that you could top it off BUT turn ON the battery while charging as opposed to normally leaving it OFF. That's why I assumed the recommendation was set at 90%. I think if I think I'm going to fly in a few days I might as well just charge'em up with this new info. And being so new, right now I'm flying every few days.

>> Burning down 3 batteries over 4 hours isn't ideal.

Completely understand. In my specific situation it wasn't a big deal. I was working so I didn't want the bird idling for 20 minutes (which is how long it takes to get to 90%) next to me. Just too loud. I didn't realize though that you could hover it for a few minutes outside safely. I'll probably take that option next time as obviously that's a lot quicker.

I guess I do have one more question (uh-huh). I notice that the Battery Status count is different than my actual count. It's a few less. When we talk about 20 flights to recalibrate, is that 20 real flights or when the Battery Status says Times Charged = 20?
Dec 16, 2015, 06:38 PM
Bog Flusher Platinum Grade
Mad_angler1's Avatar
.......
Last edited by Mad_angler1; Dec 16, 2015 at 06:57 PM. Reason: deleted
Dec 16, 2015, 06:41 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by BerenFishe
Such bad advice being given about batteries.

Leave them at 20% for a week? Sure if you get lots of free ones to replace the ruined batteries you'll have after a few dozen cycles of that treatment.

And I can't believe anyone fell for that nonsense about discharging them to 90% then back up again "just in case".

The very, very, very worst thing anyone can be doing is flying them down until they shut off by hovering them until they land.

If you really want to go through the totally unnecessary 'calibration' dance you should fly it down to no less than 20%, then land it, then let it sit there and gently discharge under no load until it shuts off, or better still: stop it yourself at no less than 3.5v per cell. Then let it cool and charge it up to 60%, or about 25 minutes on the charger, 3rd LED starting to blink.

Then store it until you want to fly it and charge it up to 100%. When you come back from flying, charge up to 60% again and store it again.

Some people are just ruining their batteries by following some of the daftest advice I've ever read about LiPos.

The whole 'calibration' procedure done wrongly is the perfect way to ruin batteries. You would never fly an aircraft on any other LiPo that low. People who fly with large, expensive, high quality 'dumb' LiPos never, ever, ever take them down below 40%, and they last a long, long time.
I've gotta admit. I get nervous when my 10Ah 6S lipos get down below 3.7 volts in a loaded (flying) state. From here they've got only 10% reserve or so (eek!) I usually fly no lower than 3.75 loaded. I get a pretty good 80% recharge out of that. I now have a properly calibrated mAh meter on my Pix so I don't have to approximate by voltage anymore. I would never run my expensive batts down to 3.35v! It's far too close to that 3.3v death point.

Are these DJI batteries some different chemistry? They are HV batteries, aren't they? 4.35v fully charged? Are the HV Lipos different than the regular as far as discharge tolerance?
Dec 16, 2015, 07:01 PM
Bog Flusher Platinum Grade
Mad_angler1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by erkq
I've gotta admit. I get nervous when my 10Ah 6S lipos get down below 3.7 volts in a loaded (flying) state. From here they've got only 10% reserve or so (eek!) I usually fly no lower than 3.75 loaded. I get a pretty good 80% recharge out of that. I now have a properly calibrated mAh meter on my Pix so I don't have to approximate by voltage anymore. I would never run my expensive batts down to 3.35v! It's far too close to that 3.3v death point.

Are these DJI batteries some different chemistry? They are HV batteries, aren't they? 4.35v fully charged? Are the HV Lipos different than the regular as far as discharge tolerance?
they are HV packs, as for the chemistery we don't have that info sadly.

There have been no reports of issues after balancing down to these low level, i agree id normally try not to do it that low my self to a lipo but the advice we have from DJI is the best we can go buy unless something changes or comes to light.

but its entirely up to folks what they do, most importantly just don't fly a partly charged pack more than anything.
Latest blog entry: Herelink 600mw Mod
Dec 16, 2015, 07:37 PM
What goes up, hopefully lands!
Repaid1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by InsaneDiego

I just reread the Battery Guide and I thought I had read that if the battery was 95%+ that you couldn't top it off. Or actually, maybe it was that you could top it off BUT turn ON the battery while charging as opposed to normally leaving it OFF. That's why I assumed the recommendation was set at 90%. I think if I think I'm going to fly in a few days I might as well just charge'em up with this new info. And being so new, right now I'm flying every few days.

>> Burning down 3 batteries over 4 hours isn't ideal.

Completely understand. In my specific situation it wasn't a big deal. I was working so I didn't want the bird idling for 20 minutes (which is how long it takes to get to 90%) next to me. Just too loud. I didn't realize though that you could hover it for a few minutes outside safely. I'll probably take that option next time as obviously that's a lot quicker.

I guess I do have one more question (uh-huh). I notice that the Battery Status count is different than my actual count. It's a few less. When we talk about 20 flights to recalibrate, is that 20 real flights or when the Battery Status says Times Charged = 20?
It is true that when the battery has sufficient charge (let's say 90% and up) and you connect to a charger that they will not auto charge further. Just simply turn on battery (Press once, release,Press and hold till all lights on) In a few moments you will see they all start to chase (Charge) again and continue the charge. I routinely Charge the night before, then in the morning I power on the batteries again and "Smack" them one more time. BTW I use the quad charger (Blue one) and pulling the plug out and back in the transmitter will cycle it to charge further. The stock charger will do the same.

IF I don't fly within a hour I will smack them another time after they rested and let them turn all off, then out to fly. Just the way I have done it and everything reads 100% when I power on.

So I find no need to do the 90% and might be lost on why you are doing that other than what you described.

As for the count. You must take the battery below 50% charge (possibly a bit lower) until it realizes and counts the charge as a charge within the firmware counter. So that is why your count is off. I would recommend you physically number your batteries in some way and keep a log yourself as to the actual count. The actual count will be your first discharge of the battery when you do a full flight of the battery to count towards your cycling for a firmware calibration.

As to the 20 cycles to calibrate, I did my first at 10 full discharges to 20% or whatever when I landed. Then every 20 beyond that. Just what I did and had no ill effects and just wanted to get them calibrated as soon as possible. Follow whatever you feel as I have had zero issues with my Phantom and the whole system since day one, wish you the best and happy flights and safe landings
Last edited by Repaid1; Dec 16, 2015 at 07:54 PM.
Dec 16, 2015, 08:19 PM
Registered User
flysohigh's Avatar
have you guys tested if the dji batteries have a slow discharge rate 5% a year (storage long periods) like standard lipos? just curious because i discharge mine between 15-25% and thinking of shelving them for a month or so?
Last edited by flysohigh; Dec 16, 2015 at 08:40 PM.


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