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Feb 14, 2020, 11:11 AM
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rickp's Avatar
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Originally Posted by queadlunnrau
Good Lord your working over time!
Well of course - can't resist that time and half pay scale!

Cheers, rick
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Feb 14, 2020, 02:09 PM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Hey Mr. Rick, what is the cheapest transmitter I can pick up that works with this sim? Would love to have one at work to do some driving during lunch time. I have an old Spectrum DX-something transmitter that came with a scrapped Delta Ray, I need to see if it has a port (I doubt it). I don't really care about a lot of fluff, just something with good stick movement and maybe a couple of switches.

Got a 42-inch LED TV in our conference room next door that needs lunch time workouts!

Some of us are not quite retired...
Feb 14, 2020, 08:06 PM
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rickp's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruff1
Hey Mr. Rick, what is the cheapest transmitter I can pick up that works with this sim? Would love to have one at work to do some driving during lunch time. I have an old Spectrum DX-something transmitter that came with a scrapped Delta Ray, I need to see if it has a port (I doubt it). I don't really care about a lot of fluff, just something with good stick movement and maybe a couple of switches.

Got a 42-inch LED TV in our conference room next door that needs lunch time workouts!

Some of us are not quite retired...
That sounds like a pleasant way to spend your lunch break.

No specific recommendation, as guess any Spektrum with a trainer port will work.
I use a DX6i myself, and you might pick up one quite reasonably.

Have fun! rick
Feb 14, 2020, 09:28 PM
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Bladecpnitro's Avatar
Nice crop duster Rick. How long does it take to build a model?
Have you created any flying fields?
Feb 14, 2020, 10:06 PM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickp
That sounds like a pleasant way to spend your lunch break.

No specific recommendation, as guess any Spektrum with a trainer port will work.
I use a DX6i myself, and you might pick up one quite reasonably.

Have fun! rick
Well, I dug out the hand-me-down transmitter, it is a DX-4. Problem is, it suffered a battery leak and won't power up. This may be one of those radios that need to be turned on. I need to open the case and determine if I can revive it.

Has anyone used this with Phoenix?

I'll report back, thanks for your effort building models! This sim will remain viable for many years...
Feb 14, 2020, 10:08 PM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Doh, a Homer Simpson moment!

Looks like it was bundled with this transmitter!

http://www.spektrumrc.com/Products/D...dID=RTM50R4400

Yes, I know search is my bf...
Feb 14, 2020, 10:47 PM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Scratch this radio, batteries leaked on to the circuit board. I put good batteries in it, it beeps all kinds of signals with the switch on and off.

Feb 15, 2020, 07:44 AM
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rickp's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruff1
Scratch this radio, batteries leaked on to the circuit board. I put good batteries in it, it beeps all kinds of signals with the switch on and off.

Ouch!

Looks like a DX6i is about $100 on eBay. Maybe there's something local to you as well.

Good hunting, rick
Feb 15, 2020, 08:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bladecpnitro
Nice crop duster Rick. How long does it take to build a model?
Have you created any flying fields?
One flying field, but didn't post it as couldn't complete it to my satisfaction.

How long does it take to build a model? Interesting question.
A simple model might take 4 hours, whereas a complex model could be more than 20 hours.

But let's test that estimate by looking at the recent Mirage 2000C, a model of average complexity.
I began it on Feb 2nd and posted it on Feb 6th, working on it 2 - 3 hours per day.
So that one took maybe 15 hours. Sounds like a reasonable number.

And why does a model take that much time?
Most of it goes into creating the 3D model, and most of that is usually the fuselage.
Look at the screenshot below and you can see that the Mirage fuselage is relative complexity.
Airfoils and other things are pretty quick these days, as I reuse bits and pieces from other models.
So it took maybe 8 hours to create the Mirage 3D model, 4 to paint it, and 2 to get it into Phoenix.

Most likely a more detailed answer than you needed.

Cheers, rick
Last edited by rickp; Feb 15, 2020 at 09:10 AM.
Feb 15, 2020, 10:23 AM
A Day @ a Time - Matt. 6:25-34
ruff1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickp
Ouch!

Looks like a DX6i is about $100 on eBay. Maybe there's something local to you as well.

Good hunting, rick
A couple of swap meets coming up in TN, might try those. DX4e units are going for 30-50.

I'll check with my fellow club mates.
Feb 15, 2020, 10:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruff1
A couple of swap meets coming up in TN, might try those. DX4e units are going for 30-50.

I'll check with my fellow club mates.
Good plan! rick
Feb 16, 2020, 04:50 PM
Registered User
Bladecpnitro's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickp
One flying field, but didn't post it as couldn't complete it to my satisfaction.

How long does it take to build a model? Interesting question.
A simple model might take 4 hours, whereas a complex model could be more than 20 hours.

But let's test that estimate by looking at the recent Mirage 2000C, a model of average complexity.
I began it on Feb 2nd and posted it on Feb 6th, working on it 2 - 3 hours per day.
So that one took maybe 15 hours. Sounds like a reasonable number.

And why does a model take that much time?
Most of it goes into creating the 3D model, and most of that is usually the fuselage.
Look at the screenshot below and you can see that the Mirage fuselage is relative complexity.
Airfoils and other things are pretty quick these days, as I reuse bits and pieces from other models.
So it took maybe 8 hours to create the Mirage 3D model, 4 to paint it, and 2 to get it into Phoenix.

Most likely a more detailed answer than you needed.

Cheers, rick
Nah! Thats a great answer and that's all done with Phoenix builder or another 3d modeling software?
What about painting the model? You end up with one bit map of the scheme to be loaded but how does PhoenixRC Sim know what and where to load the various parts of the scheme?
Last edited by Bladecpnitro; Feb 16, 2020 at 08:13 PM.
Feb 17, 2020, 08:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bladecpnitro
Nah! Thats a great answer and that's all done with Phoenix builder or another 3d modeling software?
What about painting the model? You end up with one bit map of the scheme to be loaded but how does PhoenixRC Sim know what and where to load the various parts of the scheme?
More interesting questions - before we're done we'll have you building Phoenix models yourself! I'd certainly welcome that.
For a thorough treatment of the subject visit my tutorial at https://www.dropbox.com/s/v4dhhleaaj...0v2.4.pdf?dl=0

Phoenix Builder is used to make a 3D model flyable in PhoenixRC, and there's a great tutorial of that at
Phoenix Builder - Basic airplane tutorial (26 min 9 sec)

That particular tutorial, by the way, is what got me started with making my own models. Phoenix did a great job with it.
But where do 3D models come from? That's your basic question, and it's a good one!

Any 3D editor can be used to create a usable aircraft 3D model - I use Blender, but SketchUp is popular as well.
Unpainted objects (fuselage, wings, etc.) are created with the 3D editor, and then painted with a 2D editor like Inkscape.
The painted model is then made "flyable" with Phoenix Builder.

And that last paragraph makes absolutely no sense without a few pictures to illustrate the process, so here goes.
The screenshots below are a step-by-step overview of the process used to build the Air Tractor model.
- Unpainted 3D model in Blender, with fuselage vertices highlighted
- Fuselage 3D object projected to 2D for painting (you can see the other objects as well)
- All 3D object 2D projections imported into Inkscape editor
- 2D objects full painted (transparent so you can see how the paint covers the objects)
- Finished paint scheme in Inkscape
- Painted model in Blender
- Painted model in Phoenix Builder
- Ailerons in Builder
- Ailerons closeup
- Finished model in PhoenixRC

Many small steps left out of this, but hope that it gives you a better idea of the process. Cheers, rick
Last edited by rickp; Feb 17, 2020 at 09:44 AM.
Feb 18, 2020, 06:15 AM
Registered User
Bladecpnitro's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickp
More interesting questions - before we're done we'll have you building Phoenix models yourself! I'd certainly welcome that.
For a thorough treatment of the subject visit my tutorial at https://www.dropbox.com/s/v4dhhleaaj...0v2.4.pdf?dl=0

Phoenix Builder is used to make a 3D model flyable in PhoenixRC, and there's a great tutorial of that at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7cSvXB9Aqc
That particular tutorial, by the way, is what got me started with making my own models. Phoenix did a great job with it.
But where do 3D models come from? That's your basic question, and it's a good one!

Any 3D editor can be used to create a usable aircraft 3D model - I use Blender, but SketchUp is popular as well.
Unpainted objects (fuselage, wings, etc.) are created with the 3D editor, and then painted with a 2D editor like Inkscape.
The painted model is then made "flyable" with Phoenix Builder.

And that last paragraph makes absolutely no sense without a few pictures to illustrate the process, so here goes.
The screenshots below are a step-by-step overview of the process used to build the Air Tractor model.
- Unpainted 3D model in Blender, with fuselage vertices highlighted
- Fuselage 3D object projected to 2D for painting (you can see the other objects as well)
- All 3D object 2D projections imported into Inkscape editor
- 2D objects full painted (transparent so you can see how the paint covers the objects)
- Finished paint scheme in Inkscape
- Painted model in Blender
- Painted model in Phoenix Builder
- Ailerons in Builder
- Ailerons closeup
- Finished model in PhoenixRC

Many small steps left out of this, but hope that it gives you a better idea of the process. Cheers, rick
Thanks Rick! I'll check into it. Nice post full of pics and info
Feb 18, 2020, 09:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bladecpnitro
Thanks Rick! I'll check into it. Nice post full of pics and info
And a lot to digest, I know.


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