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Feb 17, 2015, 12:11 AM
Сделем Америку Великой Снова
7oneWo1f's Avatar
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Discussion

knife sharpening


Anybody doing til?

I have a sharpmaker, which works very well on some knives. About to try my hand at honing with wetstones on some old knives, but I am not sure if I have what it takes. I will have to stop by an estate sale and pick up some old knife to practice on.


This system looks good, but way too expensive:
Wicked Edge Knife Sharpener - Sharpening Lessons Learned (28 min 6 sec)
Feb 17, 2015, 02:58 AM
sensitive artsy type
Treetop's Avatar
Having sharpened a lot of steel chisels and planes and turning tools, knives are kind of tricky, especially if the blade is curved, I have a couple carving knives with flat edge blades that are easy, but the other issue is stainless steel. My ex bought some nice German knives and one of the ceramic things you pull the knife through to sharpen it, and I didn't like that thing, it seems to leave the blade a little rough, and she actually bellied a nice chef's knife using that, meaning she pulled it through the sharpener so much that it made the edge close to the handle dip in, I can only think because when she put pressure on the handle and pulled, the pressure was greatest right close to the handle, then when the blade got close to the end, I think the blade was 8 or 10 inches, it didn't have much pressure on it, and you had to hold the sharpener down with one hand, so no way to put even pressure along the whole length by using two hands.

But I never had much luck with oil stones, I like the water stones better, and the diamond grit. But one thing which I do on turning tools is to hone them with honing compound on a slow turning leather wheel after each time I use them and this has pretty much eliminated the grinding on those, which they are, some of them, quite difficult to get the edge right, having compound curves on the cutting edge.
Feb 17, 2015, 04:42 PM
Really?
dll932's Avatar
I got one of these used. It has a slow turning cylinder stone with a water tray it sits in. You can get a hollow grind like a straight razor if you adjust it right.
I have a gadget with a guide similar to the one in the vid. Works pretty well. It cost maybe $20. I like diamond files too.
Feb 17, 2015, 04:45 PM
Really?
dll932's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Treetop
Having sharpened a lot of steel chisels and planes and turning tools, knives are kind of tricky, especially if the blade is curved, I have a couple carving knives with flat edge blades that are easy, but the other issue is stainless steel. My ex bought some nice German knives and one of the ceramic things you pull the knife through to sharpen it, and I didn't like that thing, it seems to leave the blade a little rough, and she actually bellied a nice chef's knife using that, meaning she pulled it through the sharpener so much that it made the edge close to the handle dip in, I can only think because when she put pressure on the handle and pulled, the pressure was greatest right close to the handle, then when the blade got close to the end, I think the blade was 8 or 10 inches, it didn't have much pressure on it, and you had to hold the sharpener down with one hand, so no way to put even pressure along the whole length by using two hands.

But I never had much luck with oil stones, I like the water stones better, and the diamond grit. But one thing which I do on turning tools is to hone them with honing compound on a slow turning leather wheel after each time I use them and this has pretty much eliminated the grinding on those, which they are, some of them, quite difficult to get the edge right, having compound curves on the cutting edge.
Chisels I can sharpen on the SIDE of a wheel if I need to. In the field I've touched up the edges with a Dremel and emery wheel.
Feb 17, 2015, 05:18 PM
56S
56S
Certified Balsa Breaker
56S's Avatar
This is very much like what I've been using for over 25 yrs http://www.basspro.com/Lansky-Sharpe...170&kpid=41170
I bought the basic set of three and added a couple stones one of them being diamond. The only problem I have had is the thumb screw rusted fast in the stone/handle on one of them cracking the plastic slightly. Stooped me, left it in the boat for a few months. It does give a uniform edge that holds up well. Except on the junk Leatherman blade.
Feb 17, 2015, 06:04 PM
Greediest Suer
Ron H's Avatar
I prefer a whet stone and water. A drop of dish soap makes a decent lube and seems to speed sharpening. A new stone may leave a rough edge the first few times you use it making you think you are doing it wrong, but it will smooth out and leave a keen edge once broken in. I keep two, one for straight blades and one for curved.
A good way to break them in is to get two and rub the faces against each other under running water. This will smooth both of them.
Feb 17, 2015, 06:12 PM
Blurryface, I Care Too...
n00b-E's Avatar
Mechanical sharpeners and jigs? Blasphemers...each of you.



I use a set of Smiths diamond bench stones, like this

Feb 17, 2015, 06:14 PM
Registered User
I like the Lansky for initial edge, and occasional tune up, and use a ceramic stick for keeping the keen edge.
Feb 17, 2015, 08:47 PM
It's gonna be YUGE!!!
LVsoaring's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by n00b-E
Mechanical sharpeners and jigs? Blasphemers...each of you.



I use a set of Smiths diamond bench stones, like this

Uh oh..... looks like a sad fate awaits you guys......

Monty Python's "Life of Brian" (Stoned to death...) (2 min 20 sec)
Feb 18, 2015, 02:54 AM
Professional amature
If you would like a few practical and over the top information check out:

The Kitchen Knife Forum
Feb 18, 2015, 04:52 AM
Registered User
This old Eko sharpener is my favorite. It leaves a very sharp edge.
Unless your making a new knife, or trashing a blade hacking up rocks, its all that's needed. I do like my old oil stone, but I lost it last time I moved. Its in a box somewhere.
Feb 18, 2015, 09:15 AM
Beware the Axis of Weasel.
thewildweasel's Avatar
I just use a butcher's steel. It doesn't take long to learn how to use them and my knives are always sharp - I give them a 'polish' of a stroke or two (cutting into the steel, not drawing away from the edge) each time I use them.

Chisels and planes I use a whetstone and a sharpening guide, similar to this one.
Feb 18, 2015, 10:41 AM
Registered User
Phil G's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by thewildweasel
I just use a butcher's steel. It doesn't take long to learn how to use them and my knives are always sharp - I give them a 'polish' of a stroke or two (cutting into the steel, not drawing away from the edge) each time I use them.

Chisels and planes I use a whetstone and a sharpening guide, similar to this one.
I use a Butcher's Steel also. For my Case pocketknives I have an old Diesel engine injector pintle/needle that is MUCH harder than the SS blade. Just dresses the blade without removing much if any material. I've looked at the edge under a microscope and they are beautiful. No rolling, or anything.

Feb 19, 2015, 08:33 AM
Not THAT Ira
Real Ira's Avatar
I prefer a series of flat stones for initial sharpening and use only water with them. I give the fine and super fine ones a good scrub with an abrasive clenser once in awhile to keep them unclogged. Using oil makes stones clog up much worse and faster.
Also use ceramic crock sticks for quick touch up. They work very well but also need occasional scrubbing.
Feb 19, 2015, 08:48 AM
crashdummy6's Avatar
Different grit stones and spit works great.


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