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Feb 06, 2015, 03:31 PM
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TDM30076's Avatar
Thread OP

Flaps Material Question


What is the best wood for flaps?
I am thinking contest grade light balsa. The question is do I have to go with C grain material, or any grain will do?
Anyone has some good impute on this one?
Feb 06, 2015, 06:29 PM
Duane, LSF IV
Wazmo's Avatar
As I recall, C-grain is the stiffest in torsion. A-grain will bend across the width of the sheet, and so is good for sheeting simple curves, like a wing D-box.
Feb 06, 2015, 06:33 PM
WBE
WBE
White Fang
WBE's Avatar
Traian, as you may know with your experience in F2B, Windy U. Suggests C-grain for solid balsa flaps with the grain running parallel to the trailing edge of the flap, not parallel to the hinge line.

Bill
Last edited by WBE; Feb 06, 2015 at 06:51 PM.
Feb 06, 2015, 06:46 PM
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TDM30076's Avatar
Thread OP
Yes that is what I was thinking too. Contest grade C grain.
Feb 06, 2015, 10:39 PM
Make Flying Fun
I agree, to bad though as all that nice c grain on one flapperon could make about 10 nice indoor free flight ships! Oh Well !
Feb 08, 2015, 09:24 AM
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TDM30076's Avatar
Thread OP
Friday I had a 3 hour session where I have sanded and shaped all the parts. I do not have fuselage or fuselage wood parts yet. Hopefully I will get them by the end of next week.
I have joined the wings yesterday and also I covered the tails.
I need to take some more pictures.
Feb 08, 2015, 11:45 AM
Time for me to Fly...
Mr. Wiz's Avatar
I'm just going to toss this thought out for your consideration. Back in the day, when electric powered RC planes were not the norm we had to be pretty weight and strength consious with our airframes. Batteries were heavy and brushless motors were all but unheard of. If our structures weren't light the planes wouldn't fly well. If they weren't strong they couldn't support the weight of the power system under flight loads. There was a guy that became very well known for making electric planes that performed like or better than glow powered models. His name is Keith Shaw. One of the things that Keith did was use Monokote over all other brands of covering. Why? Monokote he said was stronger than other brands of covering. Some other stuff was lighter but it stretched too much for Keith. He used this property of Monokote as part of the structural design of his airframes as a way of saving weight. Maybe, this would also be beneficial for the wing of a wooden DLG like this one..... It's just a thought.
Last edited by Mr. Wiz; Feb 08, 2015 at 01:33 PM.
Feb 08, 2015, 01:06 PM
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elkski's Avatar
About the covering. I have only used paper to cover my stringer build balsa planes.. How easy is it to put on this plastic covering? I am sure it will become part of the structure. Does it get adhered to all the ribs? I think this plane will make a striking image in the sky at a local park. IF it will toss up 150' and float at all like a modern 1.5 m ship I would be pleased.
Feb 08, 2015, 01:27 PM
who has rabbit ears down
Captain Canardly's Avatar
Hi Elkski! I used paper on a couple of the Guillows kits as a kid, and yes, the quick answer is very simple in comparison, a heat activated 'glue', which can be adjusted= tacking heat, then a touch warmer for bonding to the ribs etc., then a final + heat for final shrink/resettings of washin/outs as needed is quite simple. initial cost to get this gorgeous puppy finished: about 30-40 bucks for the iron plus covering= I still remember the 'good 'ol days'= monocote @ 6 bucks a roll, and very high quality. not like today- I had to learn a new application method with Ultrakote- very user friendly overall!
Latest blog entry: My "Kubiak" Collection
Feb 08, 2015, 01:28 PM
Time for me to Fly...
Mr. Wiz's Avatar
If you apply it properly it gets adhered to all of the airframe, including the ribs. Makes for a pretty strong skin. It takes a bit of practice to do a nice job but there are books and videos on the subject. Best to think of iron on coverings as "heat stretch" than "heat shrink". In other words, don't plan on putting it on poorly and then shrinking out all of the wrinkles. Personally, I think Ultrakote is too stretchy and sags too easily after the fact. It does go around compound curves easier but that saggy thing is the tradeoff.
Latest blog entry: Something old is new again
Feb 08, 2015, 01:56 PM
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TDM30076's Avatar
Thread OP
Yes I come from the old school too. I come from the days of silk and Dope. And yes i fly Control line stunt too.
Tissue and Dope does become part of the structure and it does add to the strength of the wing. It is perhaps the lightest and it adds the most strength to the system. The problem although the time it take to do it right and the time is measured in weeks mot hours. Those planes when they are finished are museum pieces.
I took some pictures.
Feb 08, 2015, 02:11 PM
Time for me to Fly...
Mr. Wiz's Avatar
Ive never used silk and dope, just tissue and dope. Is it really lighter? Or stronger than Monokote? I wonder....
Latest blog entry: Something old is new again
Feb 08, 2015, 03:27 PM
Registered User
JustPlaneChris's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain Canardly
I still remember the 'good 'ol days'= monocote @ 6 bucks a roll, and very high quality. not like today- I had to learn a new application method with Ultrakote- very user friendly overall!
Me too! I was away from the film covering aspect of the hobby for many years, then decided to build a wood model again. I bought Monokote, and thought I'd lost my covering skills... it was just miserable stuff. As it turns out, Monokote quality has apparently gone down the tubes. Ultrakote (or Oracover, same stuff) is far better in my experience.

This thread is awesome, can't wait to see more.

Chris
Feb 08, 2015, 04:11 PM
Time for me to Fly...
Mr. Wiz's Avatar
I haven't used any Monokote in a long time.... If what you guys are saying is true, that's a bummer.
Latest blog entry: Something old is new again


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