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Nov 26, 2014, 07:48 PM
Registered User
normclark's Avatar
Thread OP
Help!

Altitude Lock on 250 Race Quads?


Like most people I am very intrigued by the 250 race quads. I picked up a 250 Clone and some cheaper parts for my first crack at it.

It flies well and I'm getting good an cornering and and quick turns. I watch these videos and the one thing I cant seem to figure out is how these guys maintain such a consistent altitude when ripping through these woods and increasing and decreasing throttle like they do.

My question is... Are they using some sort of GPS or infrared to maintain the altitude?

If so, does anybody have a recommendation on the hardware to get?

Im running a KK2 FC. Thanks for the help.
Last edited by normclark; Nov 26, 2014 at 07:59 PM.
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Nov 26, 2014, 09:22 PM
Team AlienWarpSquad
Nop, no Altitude hold gismo. They just have been practicing quite a lot and have learned how to micro manage the throttle.

I have been through the same thing but now can hold altitude easily maneuvering through, and under trees. This has taken over 150 9-12minute flights under the googles and a few hundred 5-7 minutes flights LOS with my Acro quads.
And this is in Acro (Rate or Gryo only) mode.

So keep flying and practice, practice, practice on holding a constant altitude.
Have objects such as tree limbs, hoops, etc to fly under help to force you to learn the throttle. When I was learning fpv I decreased height right into the ground many, many times trying to duck under tree limbs. Now it is pretty easy and I'm actually maneuvering in 3D not just 2D.
Nov 27, 2014, 08:23 AM
Registered User

Sonar


Quote:
Originally Posted by normclark
Like most people I am very intrigued by the 250 race quads. I picked up a 250 Clone and some cheaper parts for my first crack at it.

It flies well and I'm getting good an cornering and and quick turns. I watch these videos and the one thing I cant seem to figure out is how these guys maintain such a consistent altitude when ripping through these woods and increasing and decreasing throttle like they do.

My question is... Are they using some sort of GPS or infrared to maintain the altitude?

If so, does anybody have a recommendation on the hardware to get?

Im running a KK2 FC. Thanks for the help.
Wonder if Sonar can react fast enough to work in a race environment?
Nov 27, 2014, 08:26 AM
Registered User

Practice Makes Perfect


Quote:
Originally Posted by waltr
Nop, no Altitude hold gismo. They just have been practicing quite a lot and have learned how to micro manage the throttle.

I have been through the same thing but now can hold altitude easily maneuvering through, and under trees. This has taken over 150 9-12minute flights under the googles and a few hundred 5-7 minutes flights LOS with my Acro quads.
And this is in Acro (Rate or Gryo only) mode.

So keep flying and practice, practice, practice on holding a constant altitude.
Have objects such as tree limbs, hoops, etc to fly under help to force you to learn the throttle. When I was learning fpv I decreased height right into the ground many, many times trying to duck under tree limbs. Now it is pretty easy and I'm actually maneuvering in 3D not just 2D.
Waltr - Like anything else that requires a high degree of skill, the more you practice the better you get, until you reach your limit of competency.
Nov 27, 2014, 08:42 AM
Registered User
normclark's Avatar
Thread OP
Thanks so much for the help.

Like anything practice make perfect. My sons and I just started flying RC in June. I can remember the first month of that, now we don't even think about the controls, it just kind of goes where we want. Im sure the same will happen after logging some hours on these quads.

As I look out my window here in Ohio and see the snow falling. I think waterproofing might be my weekend project.

Thanks again for the replies, I really appreciate it.
Nov 27, 2014, 09:11 AM
Team AlienWarpSquad
Yes, snow here also and I have been putting off waterproofing my quads.

One of the biggest issues with sonar is the surface it is trying the measure. Sonar works by measuring to 'time of flight' of an acoustic pulse reflected from an object (the ground in the case of altitude). If the surface is smooth and hard the reflect pulse is easily receiver and an accurate distance measurement is obtained.
However, if the surface is a jumble of leaves, grass or other soft irregular shape then the reflected pulse may have distortions or not even get detected which then there is a wrong or no distance value obtained.
People have put sonar on copters as landing aids but their results have varied considerably.


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