Thread Tools
This thread is privately moderated by MassiveOverkill, who may elect to delete unwanted replies.
Nov 19, 2014, 08:54 PM
Registered User
MassiveOverkill's Avatar
Thread OP
Build Log

Emax 250 Pro NightHawk Pictorial Orgy


If you've come here via this link: http://drone.lifebuzz.com/nighthawk-quadcopter/ I want to clear up any confusion. The Nighthawk 250 Pro is an FPV racer and while it's possible to do acro flying with it, it's not going to defy physics like the quad in that video, which is purpose-built for extreme LOS acro, similar to the Warpquad or BPQ Acro. If you want to do LOS (Line Of Sight) flying with extreme acrobatic maneuvers like that video, the Emax 250 is not going to give you that. What the Emax 250 Pro is going to give you is this:

Official MassiveRC Team Pilot Joel flying the MassiveRC Emax kit. Only addition are the canted motor mounts. We cannot wait to get him on OneShot and 4S:

practice with friends (4 min 8 sec)

Time trial practice (3 min 8 sec)


If you want get information about the quad in the video at Lifebuzz, check out quadmovrs blog:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/member.php?u=534985

This will go over building the Emax 250 Pro Nighthawk with the Massive Acro\32 board. It's applicable to the carbon glass V1 as well as the all carbon V2 versions. You can also use some of the pointers in this build log on other frames\builds.

I've had some contact me stating they didn't realize we sold the Emax frame\bundle, so here you go:

http://www.massiverc.com/Shop/en/20-multirotor-frames
http://www.massiverc.com/Shop/en/35-bundle-packages

I also have a thread with our Emax bundle updates here:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2279376

Also check out my new blog about additional wiring:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...0#post31502650

It's about time someone created a FB page for Emax\Storm Drone owners:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Emax-...26009634332152

Pictorial Starts Here

As with any carbon frame you want to wash it thoroughly as carbon dust is very unpleasant and hazardous. You can go one step further and wet sand the edges so they aren't sharp.

Carbon fiber is conductive so you need to make sure no exposed connections can short against the frame. In addition, carbon fiber will block RF signals so place your FPV and radio receivers so that they clear the chassis.

Finally..........soldering should be the last thing you do if you're new to DIY. Mock up, measure, re-mock up, experiment with different configurations. Throughout this pictorial you may see the FCB mounted with pins installed but unsoldered......this is for illustration purposes. The first group of pictures will go over installation of chassis\PDB\FCB for location without anything soldered, and the 2nd group of pictures will go over soldering the parts. The pictorial may seem out of chronological order at times. When soldering, you want to solder connections to the PDB without it mounted to the nylon standoffs to avoid melting them.

Onto the pictorial

First thing is to install the bolts through the main plate and screw on the spacers. You want to leave them loose for now so that when you bolt on the bottom plate, the holes line up easier:



Install your arms:



Now you can choose to install your PDB sandwiched between the main and bottom plates or install it above the main plate. If you sandwich it, you'll have less room for your ESCs, which may have to be installed onto your arms. Mounting your ESCs on your arms gives them better cooling while mounting them inboard gives you better center of gravity and better impact protection.

Standoff install for installing PDB sandwiched:



PDB installed and then bottom plate installed:



Better view of spacers:





FCB installed, side view of the stack:



Now, if you want to install the PDB above the center main plate like I did in this build, first install you standoffs (5mm used here):



Install your PDB:



And another set of standoffs...........5mm or 10mm depending on how you do the pins on your Massive Acro\32 board. If you're using rubber O-rings for vibration dampening install them next. You really don't need the O-rings if you're using HQ Props, which are balanced fairly well, but if you run with Mad Max props (props beat to hell) or if you have a vibration problem, consider installing them:

5mm:



10mm:



Finally install your FCB and secure with nuts or another set of standoffs:





Side view of PDB/FCB stack:



Install your chassis standoffs:



And then top plate:



Using 5mm standoffs you have enough clearance for the servo connectors to install on straight pins:



I'm breaking up this tutorial here, please go to the next post
Last edited by MassiveOverkill; Jul 16, 2015 at 03:33 PM.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Nov 19, 2014, 09:18 PM
Registered User
MassiveOverkill's Avatar
Thread OP

Massive Acro\32 pin configurations and component soldering


For software configuration of the Massive Acro\32 boards, please refer to the following post:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2249574

If you're looking for some PID settings to try, check out this post:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...postcount=2041

As well as Shelby Voll's video:

Full PID Tuning Cleanflight in FPV (7 min 50 sec)


There are different ways you can install the pins on your FCB, well go over a few of them as well as variations (note, for illustration in some of the pictures, the pins are just loosely put in place and aren't soldered). In addition you should install your FCB with the USB port pointing sideways. You can use the following commands in CLI to adjust:

SET ALIGN_BOARD_YAW=90 (ARROW POINTING RIGHT) or
SET ALIGN_BOARD_YAW=270 (ARROW POINTING LEFT)


With the latest version of Cleanflight a lot of CLI commands have now been moved to the GUI

Typical straight pin install:



Angle pin install, RX input and Blue Tooth still uses straight pins :



If you don't like the awkward RX input using straight pins, you can trim down the 3-row angled pin header to use on it instead of the provided straight pins:



Cut the unused pins (well not the pins, the plastic retainer holding them) outlined in red:



Now if you're using a PPM receiver, I prefer to eliminate the pins on the RX input alltogether and solder the PPM lead directly to the pads. You'll reduce the chances of loose connections as well:





My variation installing the angled pins underneath the board and angling them inwards.......you'll see why this makes for a compact, clean install. The only drawback are the SDA\SDC pins for I2C GPS hookup are blocked, but you can get a lead soldered to the pads and squeeze clearance. If you're using a PPM receiver, you can use soft serial and install GPS on pins 3 and 4 instead. Another benefit to this configuration is that all your servo lead wires are placed near the center of your board, making all your leads equidistant for the ESCs:



If you use the angled pins underneath variation you'll have a tight fit with 5mm standoffs:



So use 10mm instead:



Another shot:



Here's how to install the ESCs with the PDB mounted above the main plate. You can get them positioned better just before tightening the screws to secure the bottom plate:



Bottom plate installed:



ESC power leads and and signal wires pulled through the triangular cutouts:



If your PDB doesn't have holes to solder servo pins for a voltage tap, you can still add them yourself. Take an angled 2 pin header as shown:



Pull the pins out and rotate the legs so they're opposite each other:



Solder onto your PDB (you can solder either parallel or perpendicular to the board as your needs fit:



Soldering the XT60 power lead onto the PDB. This requires some heat:



Installing a VBAT lead for voltage monitoring (you'll need a 2nd one if you're adding FPV:



After trimming your ESC power leads, solder the front to the front power pads paying close attention to polarity:



You can't use the rear pads to solder the rear ESC power leads so use the side pads:



Use a zip tie to provide strain relief before bolting down the PDB:



For those of you who received the 36mm PDB:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...&postcount=184

Massive board soldered up. I also added some reinforcement solder to the USB connector board anchors:



Now you only need power from one of your ESCs so remove the signal wires from 3 of your ESC harnesses and plug them into a 3 pin header. I used ESC at motor position 1 for BEC power. You can use the other 3 BECs for powering other 5V accessories:



Leads installed:



If you need a 2 pin harness and don't have one, use a 3 pin harness and cut it down:



VBAT lead from PDB installed onto pins:



Buzzer installed:



Flip the board over onto the standoffs:







The only thing left to do is put heat shrink on the ESC motor leads and install the other 3 motors:



Speaking of motors. If you're using the Emax 2204 motors you're pretty safe with the provided screws, but if you're using the 1806 motors BE CAREFUL not to use screws too long that can short your motor windings.

Just have to install receiver and FPV equipment:



Got around to finishing the build..........VTX is installed but wiring not yet soldered up:



Mounted main receiver out back:



Satellite receiver on arm:



I'd normally use a wide lens Mobius but only had a standard lens available for the photo shoot:



How I mounted the VTX:



Here you can get a better shot of the VTX. I've used a piece of silicon tubing placed over the SMA connector along with washers which allows the VTX to hang freely in the top plate suspended. If necessary cut 2 pieces of silicon tubing and place one above and below the plate. This allows the unit to swing freely a few degrees which reduces stress on the SMA-to-PCB connection in a crash. In addition as you can see, I have easy access to my dip switches for changing frequencies:



Now having the battery mounted up top gives better performance and that's how most people mount their LiPos as shown above, but I actually prefer mounting the LiPo underneath the quad for a number of reasons:

-When you crash, if your LiPo is mounted up top, it's going to move forward and want to shear the VTX antenna off and smash your Mobius and video out connector unless you put a stop in front of the battery via a zip tie or some other wall to prevent the battery from sliding forward.

-By mounting the LiPo under the belly, it's free to slide forward in a crash which will help prevent the crash inertia of the battery weight from being transferred to the frame. I believe people breaking their top plates off their main frame is from the heavy battery being mounted up there. I've had to add some short standoffs to the main landing gear standoffs for extra ground clearance.

-I think the quad looks cleaner with the battery down below, plus if I want to mount something like GPS, I have plenty of real estate up top to place it.

-Finally you can see I've been able to move my Mobius back so it's better protected from a frontal crash. You can alternatively mount the mobius between the plates if you're not using a dedicated FPV camera.



AUW (All Up Weight = Complete, ready-to-fly weight including LiPo) is 530 grams, which is very respectable. Using an 808 camera or dedicated FPV camera without recording camera and using nylon hardware instead of aluminum could bring it under 500 grams. This same build with MT1806 motors would be around 500 grams AUW.



My latest build with other tips implemented:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...&postcount=111

LED install:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...&postcount=199

Dedicated FPV camera vs Mobius\808 and lag: There's no debate that a dedicated CCD FPV cam has better light performance and no lag compared to a Mobius or 808 camera. If your budget allows, get a dedicated FPV cam and Mobius\808 for recording. If you're budget is tight and you plan on recording your flight footage anyways try the Mobius\808 as your FPV cam and see if the lag bothers you. I can tell you from my experience that I only really notice the lag when flying slow through small obstacles (low limbo) where you rely more on the accuracy of what you're looking at. When flying fast it's really not that bad. You actually get used to reacting to turns a split second sooner as you approach them.

So to recap, a dedicated CCD FPV cam is ideal, but ignore the naysayers who say it's impossible to fly FPV with the Mobius\808 as your FPV camera, it is possible even in FPV racing, probably not if you're doing slow obstacle course flying through playground equipment.

Jordan Horwitz's soldering tutorial:

Naze32 Getting Started - Soldering (8 min 59 sec)


Another soldering tip: Before soldering up your PDB you should check it for shorts. After you make each soldered connection to the PDB you should recheck for shorts and one last time before you actually hook up the battery for the first time.

Final notes: If you bought our kit and plan on soldering your ESC-Motor connections you're OK, but if you want to use bullets, our MT1806 motors and 12 amp ESCs don't have bullets (our next batch will).

Our MT2204 motors have both male bullets and color-coded heat shrink installed. If you want to use bullets with these, you'll need to order 12 of the male bullets for the 12 amp ESCs:

http://www.massiverc.com/Shop/en/490...connector.html

If you chose the MT1806 motors you'll need 12 of the female bullets as well:

http://www.massiverc.com/PrestaShop/...connector.html

If you plan on setting your Massive32/Acro or similar board set up with pins underneath, you can possibly fit the connections using the provided 5mm standoffs, but you may need the 10mm standoffs if you want extra clearance (any of the following will work):

http://www.massiverc.com/Shop/en/503...-set-of-4.html
http://www.massiverc.com/Shop/en/428...-set-of-4.html
http://www.massiverc.com/Shop/en/429...-set-of-4.html
http://www.massiverc.com/Shop/en/467...-set-of-4.html

If you're wondering how to dye your white nylon standoffs a particular color yourself, check my previous blog:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2284829

A customer just asked me about mounting hardware so I figured I'd add this answer I sent:

"Hi,

First off, lets go over the thread size: M3 is pretty much the standard so when you're looking for hardware you want M3 threads (which is all we carry):

Screws: Pretty self explanatory and you'll also see the length in millimeters

Nuts: Also self explanatory. If there's a another spec given other than M3, it's usually the height of the nut, but they're pretty standard

Standoffs: These are used for connecting upper and lower decks as well as used in mounting flight control boards and other electronic equipment. There are two types, the double-female where you have to install screws on both ends to secure it. Think of it as a really tall nut. Then you have the male-female where one end is threaded and the other end has a screw end, which makes it easy for stacking them. Most will use the male-female when mounting FCBs (Flight Control Boards)

Probably the most important dimension other than M3 is the height of the standoff. For mounting FCBs you can get a bunch of 5mm male-female and just stack them as necessary if you need more clearance. They also work in place of a nut and the're easier to remove by hand vs a plain nut. For connecting upper and lower decks 35-45mm are popular lengths
"

Want to set up a pitch only gimbal for FPV racing, here you go:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2295002
Last edited by MassiveOverkill; Jul 16, 2015 at 03:35 PM.
Nov 19, 2014, 09:59 PM
Registered User
DirtyDovi's Avatar
Yeeeaaah!

Now 'this' is my kinda' build! Super-clean and modular... Love it!
Romeo, fantastic job!

*Thumbs Up*



Sam -
Nov 19, 2014, 10:25 PM
Registered User
MassiveOverkill's Avatar
Thread OP
Thank you Sam!!
Nov 20, 2014, 12:58 AM
.... flyin' dirty ....
DirtyThirty's Avatar
Nice work !!!
Nov 20, 2014, 08:51 AM
Registered User
bigmoebbq's Avatar
I swapped out the stock prop nuts for some nylon locking nuts. Otherwise looks great!
Nov 20, 2014, 11:19 AM
Registered User
MassiveOverkill's Avatar
Thread OP
Thanks Dirty and Moe.
Nov 20, 2014, 03:21 PM
Registered User
I hate you!!!!

Been on the fence of doing one of these builds for the few weeks.
This post forced my fingers to push that 'checkout' button today....
Order has been placed for hopefully everything I need.
ggrrrrrrrr
Nov 20, 2014, 09:51 PM
Soar high, huck low
electrich's Avatar
Mine should arrive tomorrow. Looking forward to the build and learned a lot by watching this thread. Thanks!
Latest blog entry: Super sized Delta combat wing
Nov 20, 2014, 11:04 PM
Registered User
MassiveOverkill's Avatar
Thread OP
Feel free to share you builds in this blog or over here:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2279376

and please give us a Reddit bump:

http://www.reddit.com/r/fpvracing/co...undle_for_160/
Nov 21, 2014, 10:46 PM
Registered User
Nora's Avatar
hi

just got a set of these esc and motors ( wish i did see this frame its nice) and i have problems programing them without a program card any intructions somewhere ?

thanks
Nov 22, 2014, 07:58 AM
Registered User
MassiveOverkill's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nora
hi

just got a set of these esc and motors ( wish i did see this frame its nice) and i have problems programing them without a program card any instructions somewhere ?

thanks
Hi Nora,

You can program via your transmitter. Here are the instructions: https://www.massiverc.com/PrestaShop..._attachment=31

If you just need to calibrate your ESC's please refer to this post and links:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...68&postcount=4
Nov 22, 2014, 09:19 PM
Micro Quad Flyer
QuadBert's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassiveOverkill
In addition you should install your FCB with the USB port pointing sideways. You can use the following commands in CLI to adjust:

SET ALIGN_BOARD_YAW=90 (ARROW POINTING RIGHT) or
SET ALIGN_BOARD_YAW=270 (ARROW POINTING LEFT)
This is the first time I've seen anyone besides me do this. I mounted mine sideways and did the rotate. I think this is a great tip for anyone, but especially for new builder who might not know how easily they can to it. It makes programming and tweaking via the USB port so much easier than if it is mounted forward. You need to get to the USB port far more often than any of the other pins, so a 90 degree rotation just makes sense. The other connections you seldom touch once the build is done, but I'm always tweaking something in the settings. I guess if you use bluetooth and a tablet, it might not matter, but I like using my laptop and USB for most things.
Nov 23, 2014, 04:31 AM
Registered User
Nora's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassiveOverkill
Hi Nora,

You can program via your transmitter. Here are the instructions: https://www.massiverc.com/PrestaShop..._attachment=31

If you just need to calibrate your ESC's please refer to this post and links:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...68&postcount=4
Thanks
Nov 23, 2014, 09:48 AM
Registered User
Nora's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by MassiveOverkill
Hi Nora,

You can program via your transmitter. Here are the instructions: https://www.massiverc.com/PrestaShop..._attachment=31

If you just need to calibrate your ESC's please refer to this post and links:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...68&postcount=4
Did them both , 2 of them still off ... Guess I need a programing card for them .

Going to have to wait again


Quick Reply
Message:
Thread Tools