RG 65 Mass Build? - Page 5 - RC Groups
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Jan 10, 2015, 05:11 AM
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Hi chaps

Now Christmas is out of the way I've finally got my arse in gear
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Jan 10, 2015, 05:11 PM
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Still a lot of guess work in terms of displacement and waterline but i figure i'll just build it and see what happens
Jan 12, 2015, 04:47 PM
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These photo's were taken a couple of days ago,. Since then the sails are finished and the hull is ready to receive it's last couple of coats of resin.
Jan 12, 2015, 06:09 PM
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looking good FWAL, what weight glass cloth are you using and how are you taping the seams on your sails? I've tried to get my head round the 'claudio gadget' but i'm not fully understanding yet!
Jan 12, 2015, 06:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tim_uk
I've tried to get my head round the 'claudio gadget' but i'm not fully understanding yet!
Yes, it is easy to make sails with the camber inside out if you get the sequence wrong!!!
Try practicing with a couple of sheets of paper a few times...

Lets assume your Claudio Gadget is made from a piece of timber 600mm x 90mm x 10mm with a 10mm aluminium U section screwed to the 10mm edge, a single screw in the centre..

1) Start with the bar straight
2) Lay the gadget flat on the table in front of you with the bar closest to you
3) Apply a layer of double sided tape to the bar (this layer will eventually be discarded)
4) Remove the upper protective layer of the tape and run a finger over it so it is not too sticky (makes it easy to remove from the finished sail later)
5) Curve the bar by inserting wedges (playing cards or business cards are good)
6) Apply the lower section of sail to the tape. The top edge should align with the timber. The rest of this lower sail section should be closer to you and drape over the edge of the table
7) Straighten the bar and clamp it straight. You now have the shape forced into the lower section
8) Apply a layer of tape along the edge of the lower section of the sail, aligned with the join of the bar and the timber (This layer will be a permanent part of the sail)
9) Remove the protective covering from the tape.
10) Reaching over the Gadget, bring the lower edge of the upper section of the sail toward you from the far side of the table and apply it to the exposed tape
11) Press or roll the joint together until it is thoroughly stuck.
12) Now peel the completed sail from the aluminium bar. The original layer of tape we applied back in step 3 should now come unstuck and any residual can be removed from the sail

Hopefully you now have a curved section of sail.....

Hope this helps... works for me...
Jan 12, 2015, 07:52 PM
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Another little trap (sort of) with the Claudio is to make sure the luff is towards the same side on both the main and jib.
If for example you have a mark on the Claudio showing which side the right angle part of the sail is, that right angle is on the opposite side on the jib compared to the main.
Then, at rest, your sails look awkward with one natural camber towards port and the other towards starboard.

Not that I've ever done that
Jan 13, 2015, 08:27 AM
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FWAL's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by tim_uk
looking good FWAL, what weight glass cloth are you using and how are you taping the seams on your sails? I've tried to get my head round the 'claudio gadget' but i'm not fully understanding yet!
Hi Tim
I used 80g/m2 cloth. As this hull will be balsa cored I sprayed it with a light dusting of 3M spray mount. Then carefully spread the cloth over the hull. Believe me it works and makes the wetting out a lot easier with no puckering up. I've been using spray mount to adhere the FG cloth to the balsa for a couple of years and four IOM builds. Touch wood to date I have had no adverse effects of delaminating etc. Trust me if you haven't already tried it I would seriously recommend using it. Roughly 4 hrs after the initial wetting out it had cured enough to apply another coat of resin but despite leaving the hull in the garage at <5 degrees over night the second coat had hardened off too much and the dreaded wax had risen. Once this occurs it's back to the sanding block and a couple of days delay. This Saturday I should be able to complete the hull with another two coats of resin.
As for the seams I'm using the 'Claudio' technique as described below. I used business cards for the shims and went 3 thick at the top seam then 2 and 1 at the bottom panel seam. I only wish I had turned the bottom middle panel and top panel over to stabilise the shape a bit better. The film having been rolled up for so long falls into shape a lot better on one tack than the other.
Jan 13, 2015, 01:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FWAL
... I only wish I had turned the bottom middle panel and top panel over to stabilise the shape a bit better. The film having been rolled up for so long falls into shape a lot better on one tack than the other.
A couple of our locals have had this issue. It becomes a real problem in light winds / drifters, particularly in shaped sails when the jib will not "pop through".

I predict this will give you grief
Jan 18, 2015, 01:01 PM
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Work is continuing, finished planking during the week and the boat is currently baking in my ghetto auto clave

Good tip with the spray mouth FWAL, tried it and it works a treat. And thanks for the info about the claudio gadget MrPenguin, I'll be having a crack at making some sails soon.
Jan 19, 2015, 03:56 AM
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Good progress this weekend, shame about having to go to work for the rest of the week!!
Jan 19, 2015, 11:04 AM
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FWAL's Avatar
That is looking seriously smart Tim. Now the questions begin:
Which resin did you use and what weight cloth.
Are you thinking of painting
Where did you get your pins from. Mine always rust which often stains the surrounding balsa.
Jan 19, 2015, 04:11 PM
Registered User
Hi FWAL

Nothing fancy - West system 105/205, with 2 thinned coats over 80gsm cloth. I've been down this road before though and t always turns out heavier expected. And I haven't used any pins for this build, just superglue and quick hands The planking isn't perfect by any means but its a lot better than previous efforts.

When I started I was fully intending this to be the plug for my first go at a laminated hull, its turned out better than expected so I'm not going to cover it in microballon filler just yet in the hope i can turn what i have into boat (might still try a laminating couple of practice hulls off it to get a feel for the process) I'm a sucker for a nice wooden boat, i guess there are worse crimes
Jan 20, 2015, 05:32 AM
Si2
Si2
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Tim
Basic question; what do you think the epoxy with?
Jan 20, 2015, 06:23 AM
Registered User
Hi Si2

I used acetone, it's evil stuff!

Basic mix (which was just enough for an RG65 hull) was...

15grams 105 epoxy
3grams 205 hardner
2grams west system acetone.

Hope that helps
Jan 20, 2015, 10:31 AM
Lucas
Tim - Looks great, thanks for sharing your pictures and methods. I received a some RG65 parts from ERC for Christmas. I have a keel, rudder, bulb, and trunk, so I need to build a hull and rig. I'm thinking of the Esteral from Claudio. I've been playing around in Rhino. I'll post more when I have more to share. Thanks to FWAL and Tim_UK for the inspiration in this thread!


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