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Aug 11, 2014, 07:40 PM
Jack
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Mini-Review

iPower iPM2212-920KV CW and CCW Motors for the DJI Phantom 2 Vision


iPower iPM2212-920KV motor for DJI Phantom 2 Vision

Description: iPower iPM2212-920KV clockwise and counter clockwise motor with M3 screws for DJI Phantom 2 Vision.

Features:

-EZO Japanese bearing
-0.2mm silicon steel sheets
-Dynamic balance
-CNC MACHINED ALUMINUM CASE
-180 degree magnets

Specifications:

-Motor Kv 920 RPM / Volt
-Stator Diameter 22.0 mm
-Stator Thickness 12.0 mm
-No. of Stator Arms 12
-Magnet Poles 14
-No-Load Current (Io/10V) 0.45 Amps
-Motor Resistance (Rm) 0.117 Ohms
-Max Continuous Current 14 Amps
-Max Continuous Power 220 Watts
-Weight 48 Grams (52 grams as tested with motor leads and 3.5mm connectors)
-Outside Diameter 27.7 mm
-Body Length 26 mm
-Max Lipo Cell 2-4s
-No-Load Current: .5A
-Max Current: 13.80A
-Continuous Current: 10.8A
-Max Watts: 150W
-Lipo Cells: 2-3s
-Weight: 65g (with hardware)
-Dimensions: 28x26mm
-Motor Lead length: 45mm
-Shaft Diameter: 3.175mm
-Recommended Prop: 10x4.5 / 10x4.5R
-Recommended ESC: 22A

This motor is currently available at iFlight's online store at funtobuyonline.com.

My Overview

Another nicely made iFlight RC motor. It is a little unusual in that it is offered as a direct replacement for the motors in the very popular DJI Phantom 2 Vision quadcopter. As such, the motor has the proprietary DJI motor shaft that matches the one of a kind mounting used on DJI propellers. And it is offered in two versions, one with the prop shaft right hand threaded for CW motors and one left hand threaded for CCW motors motors.

Fortunately I had one propeller of the DJI type to test this motor with. It is the iFlight iCF 9 x 4.7 DJI Style Carbon Fiber prop. That is similar in size to the DJI prop supplied with the Phantom 2 quad and will provide a good appraisal of this motors capabilities.

This motor has 45 mm long motor leads with tinned ends. No motor to ESC connectors are fitted to the leads or supplied with the motor, I put 3.5mm bullet connectors on the motor for testing.

Included Accessories

1 - Bullet shaped hex nut (silver with right hand thread for CW motors, black and left hand thread for CCW motors)

Details Noted

The magnet housing was removed for inspection and it showed this to have a nicely made 12N14P motor. The magnet housing dome had generous openings for good cooling air flow and the dome and prop shaft are CNC machined as a one piece assembly. The flux ring has individual pockets for the magnets to provide precisely controlled alignment and spacing.

The flux ring was very effective as far as containing the magnetic forces. There was not even enough flux leakage to hold a small screw to the outside of the magnet housing. That is an obscure consideration for most motor buyers but the absence of flux leakage is a good thing in a brushless outrunner motor and a sign of a well designed motor made with good materials.

A motor with a magnet housing that wants to gather up nearby screws and hold them onto the side of the magnet housing is not a good thing. The gathering up of nearby parts is not a sign of a motor having stronger magnets, it is a sign of flux leakage.

The housing rotates on 1/8" /3.175mm shaft fitted to a blind bore in the magnet housing interior and retained by a grub screw. The shaft rides in a pair of good quality Japanese EZO bearings.

I tested the grub screw that retains the shaft in the housing and, while it was adequately tightened, I loosened it with a 1.5mm hex wrench, put a tiny drop of blue Loctite on it and re-tightened it. I would do that on any small motor like this to ensure the grub screw did not loosen in testing and as a long term measure against the shaft slipping in the dome.

The stator windings very nicely done. I don't strip or unwind motors when I review them but I always look at the details from the viewpoint of someone with an interest in the motor winding process. This motor has the commonly found dLRK winding with a Delta termination.

The 22mm O.D. x 12mm tall stator had 60 very hard to count laminations of 0.2mm silicon steel. Those thin laminations are the state of the art for this type of motor and made from good quality steel, contributing significantly to the power and efficiency of this motor.

The bearings, as always with 3.175mm 1/8" shafts, are Imperial (Inch) sized bearings and that can be a point of confusion if they ever need replacing. The bearings in this motor are:

Lower bearing
0.125" x 0.3125" x 0.1406" - type R2-5-ZZ
(1/8" X 5/16" X 9/64")
(3.175mm x 7.94mm x 3.57mm = approximate metric dimensions)

Upper bearing
0.125 x 0.375 x 0.15625 - type R2ZZ
(1/8 x 3/8 x 5/32)
(3.175mm x 9.53mm x 3.97m = approximate metric dimensions)

The base plate and bearing tube were of a design and quality that is typical for the MultiMate motors. There were a number of slots cut to allow for cooling air flow and heat dissipation. And those openings will also be used to put a temperature sensor in direct contact with the windings to monitor the temperature as I test this motor.

The base plate has four threaded holes for 3mm motor mounting screws arranged in a 16mm x 19mm pattern. As always, the mounting screw holes are open to the interior of the back plate. The screw length needs to be kept to the length that provides 5 to 6 turns of engagement in the back plate. An excess of length on the screws can short out the windings.

Jack
Last edited by jackerbes; Aug 12, 2014 at 06:36 PM.
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Aug 11, 2014, 07:46 PM
Jack
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Thread OP
Prop Testing

I don't have a Phantom quad and DJI does not share much in the way of specs on their props. I think the props supplied with the Vision 2 are 9.4" x 4.3" props based on their "9443" part numbers. So the 9 x 4.7 prop I am testing should be just the right size for use on this motor. It is a good quality Carbon Fiber prop, and will handle a higher RPM and use a little less power at a given RPM than would a typical plastic or plastic and fiber filled composition prop.

Testing Regimen

To give some background on how I do the testing, the regimen is to pause for about 10 seconds at 25%, 50%, 75% throttle and then go to 100%. A thrust reading was noted at each pause and the winding tempeature is watched as the test proceeds. At 100% throttle I watch the rate of temperature rise and end the testing when the temperature stabilizes (stops rising). Or, if the windings in the motor get to a temperature of 120F/49C the motor would be throttled back to cool down and/or the test will be ended. The coatings on the windings in these motors is typically rated for use at 311F/155C or higher. To allow for higher temperatures in the inner layers of the windings I stop well short of any heat damage occurring and before enough heat is radiated to cause damage to the magnets. Magnets will not recover from heat damage and that can start occurring at temperatures as low as 50C or so.

In some of my test data, you'll see the temperature of the motor fall a little during the 25% or even 50% test. That can happen when the motor has not cooled down to the ambient temperature from the last test when I start the next test. It is not a mistake or of any consequence in the results.

If the temperature stabilized at 100% throttle the prop and motor combo was considered as OK for continuous full throttle use and that is mentioned as a comment. If I had to stop or throttle back due to excessive heat I would usually consider that the combo was usable at less than full throttle but that the user has to manage throttle usage at higher to full throttle That will also be explained in the comments.

I do not consider it to be unusual or a bad thing that a prop and motor combo are capable of overheating and even damaging a motor. I measure the temperature directly from the windings and use a conservative 130F/54C value as my maximum allowable temperature in testing. No damage will occur at that heat level.

I also consider it OK to run a motor at a continuous and stabilized 120F/49C temperature. The motor is being used "hard" or to it's full capability there but not hard enough to cause damage. When a motor runs at that temperature in static testing, it will normally run a little cooler in flight. That is because the prop is less "stalled" in flight, the current will drop a little, and the motor will also normally have better cooling air flow. So, generally speaking, anything that does not overheat in static testing will not overheat at the same throttle setting in flight.

I think a flyer has to know the limits of his power system and that it is not unusual to know it if you cannot fly at continuous full throttle without overheating the motor.

My Test Bemch

I use a R2 Hobbies Pulling Station as a test platform, it is seen below. It has been modified and augmented considerably. An Eagle Tree Systems eLogger is my primary data collector and I keep some notes on thrust by hand. Thrust is measured by an Arduino based sensor system. A more detailed explanation of the test bed and how I use the data is here:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...3&postcount=14

Jack
Aug 11, 2014, 07:55 PM
Jack
jackerbes's Avatar
Thread OP

Test Data


Test Data

And finally, the test data. I am posting the data in the first two images because the posting editor here does a miserable job of displaying columns of data spaced with tabs. And it is a lot of work to try to clean that up and make it easily readable.

The Phantom uses a 3S battery, I have tested this motor and prop on 2S, 3S, 4S, and 5S as it is not out of the question that it will be used at other voltages.

This motor is sold as a 2S-3S motor but can be used at higher voltages as long as the user makes certain that the heat does not become excessive.

The last image is the data from one testing session as seen the the eLogger's Data Recorder application.

I will be getting more props for testing with this motor in the next few weeks and will add to the test data when that happens.

Jack
Aug 12, 2014, 02:28 AM
Registered User
manuel v's Avatar
Alright Jack.
But I miss measure Kv.

Here in post 5 and 6 find the measurements I take the DJI 300-920 and Multistar MT 2213-935
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...8#post29128262


Manuel V.
Oct 19, 2014, 07:42 AM
Jack
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Thread OP
I recently ran all seven of the DJI hub props I have on hand through tests with this motor. The props tested are seen in the first image.

Because of the way the posting editor here handles tabbed data the results are probably easier to read from the attached images than the listings below:

Motor: MultiMate iPM2212-920 - Page 1 of 4

Prop: iFlight iCF 8055 Carbon Fiber DJI Hub (TE Style blade)
3S (12.3V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 12.33 0.68 8 4150 54 69/21
50% 12.31 1.30 16 5911 123 69/21
75% 12.25 2.41 30 7782 211 70/21
100% 12.16 4.73 58 9953 349 72/22
Comment: OK for continuous use

Prop: iFlight iCF 8055 Carbon Fiber DJI Hub (TE Style blade)
4S (16.4V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 16.36 0.85 14 5219 93 71/22
50% 16.34 1.73 28 7347 190 72/22
75% 16.26 3.72 61 9971 348 72/22
100% 16.10 7.25 117 12541 573 75/24
Comment: OK for continuous use

Prop: FunToBuyOnline 8045 (white plastic, MR style blade)
3S (12.3V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 12.32 0.74 9 3176 70 87/31
50% 12.25 1.82 22 4908 100 82/28
75% 12.16 4.12 50 6749 351 80/27
100% 11.96 8.48 101 8626 573 82/28
Comment: OK for continuous use

Prop: FunToBuyOnline 8045 (white plastic, MR style blade)
4S (16.4V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 16.40 0.97 16 4004 112 76/24
50% 16.32 2.84 46 6390 317 74/23
75% 16.15 6.59 106 8675 574 77/25
100% 15.90 12.47 198 10486 871 90/32
Comment: OK for continuous use

Motor: MultiMate iPM2212-920 - Page 2 of 4

Prop: iFlight iCF 9047 Carbon fiber DJI Hub (DJI Style blade)
3S (12.3V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 12.25 0.78 10 3127 82 74/23
50% 12.16 2.04 25 4930 234 74/23
75% 12.05 4.73 57 6716 452 76/24
100% 11.83 9.31 113 8268 675 82/28
Comment: OK for continuous use

Prop: iFlight iCF 9047 Carbon fiber DJI Hub (DJI Style blade)
4S (16.4V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 16.43 0.99 16 3915 140 78/26
50% 16.32 3.02 49 6275 386 82/26
75% 16.14 7.34 119 8250 677 86/30
100% 15.83 14.48 229 9651 987 106/41
Comment: 80% throttle (727g) OK for continuous use, 100% OK for 10 second bursts

Prop: iFlight iCF 9443 Carbon Fiber DJI Hub 8mm Hole
3S (12.3V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 12.32 0.75 9 3374 90 73/23
50% 12.27 1.79 22 5011 222 72/22
75% 12.16 4.19 51 6970 433 73/23
100% 11.97 8.12 97 8779 677 77/25
Comment: OK for continuous use

Prop: iFlight iCF 9443 Carbon Fiber DJI Hub 8mm Hole
4S (16.4V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 16.36 0.93 15 4090 137 76/24
50% 16.29 2.67 44 6433 369 75/24
75% 16.12 6.26 101 8738 663 77/25
100% 15.88 11.94 190 10752 1018 86/30
Comment: OK for continuous use

Motor: MultiMate iPM2212-920 - Page 3 of 4

Prop: iFlight iCF 9443 Carbon Fiber DJI Hub Self Locking
3S (12.3V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 12.32 0.73 9 3154 80 79/26
50% 12.24 1.87 23 4987 219 77/25
75% 12.14 4.32 52 6887 430 76/24
100% 11.95 8.37 100 8685 679 79/26
Comment: OK for continuous use

Prop: iFlight iCF 9443 Carbon fiber DJI Hub Self Locking
4S (16.4V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 16.40 0.99 16 4076 144 78/26
50% 16.32 2.60 43 6247 356 76/24
75% 16.18 6.02 97 8486 648 79/26
100% 15.91 12.28 195 10633 994 89/32
Comment: OK for continuous use

Prop: iFlight iCF 1038 Carbon Fiber DJI Hub 8mm Hole (TE Style blade)
3S (12.3V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 12.27 0.80 10 2816 93 80/27
50% 12.20 2.36 29 4685 276 78/26
75% 12.05 5.50 66 6406 520 79/26
100% 11.83 10.50 124 7916 795 84/29
Comment: OK for continuous use

Prop: iFlight iCF 1038 Carbon Fiber DJI Hub 8mm Hole (TE Style blade)
4S (16.4V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 16.40 1.03 17 3547 158 81/27
50% 16.29 3.50 57 5945 447 80/27
75% 16.10 8.06 130 7889 795 85/29
100% 15.81 14.54 230 9367 1149 123/51
Comment: 90% throttle (930g) OK for continuous use, 1300% OK for 10 second bursts

Motor: MultiMate iPM2212-920 - Page 4 of 4

Prop: DJI 9443 Self Locking prop (plastic blades)
3S (12.3V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 12.25 0.79 10 3126 88 74/23
50% 12.16 2.04 25 4930 184 74/23
75% 12.05 4.73 57 6716 415 76/24
100% 11.83 9.51 113 8270 670 82/28
Comment: OK for continuous use

Prop: DJI 9443 Self Locking prop (plastic blades)
4S (16.4V)
Throttle Volts Amps Watts RPM Thrust(g) Winding Temp (F/C)
25% 16.43 0.99 16 3917 120 78/26
50% 16.32 3.03 49 6276 354 77/25
75% 16.14 7.33 118 8254 677 86/30
100% 15.83 14.47 229 9651 1020 126/52
Comment: 80% throttle (755g) OK for continuous use, 100% OK for 15 second bursts

Jack
Oct 26, 2014, 09:06 PM
Registered User
manuel v's Avatar
I have this motor, along with 3 others who sent me Jack.
Thank you very much for that.

My tests are as follows.

No load. .29A, 11.24V, 10,700 rpm 925 Kv.

Iflight 9.4x4.3 CF 8mm. 6.74A, 11V, 8100 rpm, 74.14watts.

DJi stock plastic propeller. 6.89A, 11V, 8000 rpm, 75.79Watts.


DJi 2212-920 vs Ipower. 2212-920.

DJi= Kv= 878, 7.86A, 11.31V, 88.89Watts, 7900 rpm.

Iflight= Kv= 925, 6.78A, 10.85V, 73.56 Watts, 7900 rpm.

Clearly it to move the DJI 9.4x4.3 prop 7900 rpm, the motor Ipower 2212-920 is more efficient and requires only 73.56 watts input.
While the DJI 2212/920 occupies 88.89 watts input.


Manuel V.
Oct 27, 2014, 08:39 AM
Jack
jackerbes's Avatar
Thread OP
Thanks for the excellent report on that Manuel!

Us static testing guys always have an opinion as to what is good or better but there is nothing better than a report from someone that has actually flown it. Looking forward to your impressions on that too.

Jack
Oct 27, 2014, 03:45 PM
Registered User
manuel v's Avatar
You see much difference between the two motors, I began to review the data and I find that while the DJI data were obtained in May, during the season of heat, until 105F in that month, and now in October around 85-90F.
I think that also use the same tools.

I decided to test further the DJI motor and I found very different initial data of May.

My tests are as follows.

Motor DJI 2212-920
No load. .33A, 11.20V, 9,800 rpm 875 Kv.

Iflight 9.4x4.3 CF 8mm. 6.40A, 11V, 8000 rpm, 70.4 watts.

DJi stock plastic propeller. 6.50A, 11V, 8000 rpm, 71.5 Watts.


DJi 2212-920 vs Ipower. 2212-920.

DJi= Kv= 875, 6.42A, 10.93V, 70.17 Watts, 7900 rpm.

IPower= Kv= 925, 6.78A, 10.85V, 73.56 Watts, 7900 rpm.


Now the results are very different, with a slight advantage for 3-watts motor for DJI

But now if the motors are compared on an equal footing.

In temperature tests, the motor Ipower I reached a temperature stabilized at 3minutes at 97.2F, and the temperature continued to rise to fully decelerate the motor to 107.8F.
Instead the motor DJI stabilized at three minutes and off 102.4F and the temperature was increased to 110.5F.
Oct 27, 2014, 06:20 PM
Jack
jackerbes's Avatar
Thread OP
That is interesting, I never realized that the ambient temperature could make that much difference on the motor temperature.

Those were static and at full throttle, you don't think either would overheat in flight do you?

You would have to be one wild pilot to fly a quad a full throttle or very long I think...

Jack
Oct 27, 2014, 09:29 PM
Registered User
manuel v's Avatar
I remember that when applied to the test motor heating you told me that the motor could be jamming.
I test second motor and the results are similar to the results of May.
Tomorrow proves both that I need to see results.
Last edited by manuel v; Oct 27, 2014 at 09:47 PM.
Oct 29, 2014, 12:30 AM
Registered User
manuel v's Avatar
After multiple tests in the 4 motors DJI, I find the reason of excessive consumption, is the DJI stock prop CCW.

The 4 motors measure very similar to propellers iFlight CF.
Both CW and the CCW.

But the readings are very different when using the DJI propellers (I'm using the multicopter)
being low, around 72 watts, those taken with CW propellers
and higher, about 86 watts, with CCW.

The first time i test the 4 motors, worked about the same.
But after some use in the model, the CCW are damaged in some way.

Manuel V
Oct 29, 2014, 06:11 AM
Jack
jackerbes's Avatar
Thread OP
Interesting finding. Is the damage visible at all? Like the tips torn up a little?

When I do clumsy things with the hex I often damage the tips of the CF props a little but keep flying them. After a while I can see or even hear the effects of the prop damage so I sand the damaged tips smooth and rounded again, re-balance the props, and keep using them.

I bought a dozen of these props a few months ago and am very happy with them. They come with the nice metal sizing adapters:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/10x4-5-Carbo...-/380953048531

Those 10 x 4.5 CF props work out to about $3.25 each, are as good as any I have found (they are usually marked "Neewer") and are shipped quickly and from here in the U.S. If you search all of emilyandlily's items for "propeller" you'll find they sell a lot of them including the DJI props. They have over 16,000 items listed...

When you see an emilyandlily item with a ridiculously high price, like four HY-6030 plastic props selling for $103.58, it means the item is not in stock. They raise the price so that nobody will buy them instead of deleting the item from their listings for some reason...

Jack
Oct 30, 2014, 12:16 AM
Registered User
manuel v's Avatar
I see no problem with the propellers. are physically well.

Where I see the difference is in these two motor bearings.
being more guy the bearing base DJI.
Of course that's not the problem.
But I like the Ipower motor have a big bearing.


Now I am experiencing DJI motors rewind and while flying with Ipower, already installed on the Quadracopter.
Oct 31, 2014, 12:46 AM
Registered User
manuel v's Avatar
Conclusion in DJI problem.
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...9#post29822400
Nov 26, 2014, 05:23 PM
Registered User
manuel v's Avatar
Temperature test with CF propellers


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