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Aug 10, 2014, 06:42 AM
Registered User
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Help!

Take off's


Well what I need is lots of advise from foam fighter pilots. I have been flying for about 2 years, that's with really no training just self taught which is not so good! I have weak areas and I thought "Let me through the question out there and get help!" HOW TO TAKE OFF IN MY FOAM FIGHTER AND NOT CRASH ON TAKE*OFF? Nose overs, left torque roll, wing stall...Everyone seems to have their own idea, go fast, go slow, give it a little rudder, try ailerons...some do better with a little right aileron, etc...

So I have a hard time with take-offs and landings, but let just talk about take-offs first.
What is the best way to take -off?
Type of Planes: Foam Fighters, Dynam, Parkzone, Blitz, FMS, etc...about 35 to 48 inch wing span, 3 to 5 lbs. Stock setup. Assuming all per-flight is properly done, CG, right size bat, right kind bat, built right, control surfaces adjusted, etc...
So bring it on....give me good scripted advise, send me to links, use visual ads. etc.
Thank You morockpow
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Aug 10, 2014, 06:55 AM
Registered User
chrispkaiser's Avatar
I think the issue is that a lot of war birds a short coupled. The fuselage is much shorter than the wingspan. I love Corsairs and they are difficult to get off the ground. I have had several and none of them were easy. My most successful takeoffs occurred when I got my plane to "taxi" at around half throttle with right rudder(a lot of it)to get it going in a straight line. Once the tail got off the ground I would increase the throttle steadily up to full and lift off. Mine always wanted to go left on the ground(torque)so it was a matter of getting used to it. I never had one that wanted to torque roll, however. None of my other planes are that difficult to get on and off the ground so I feel your frustration. I hope this helps at least a little. I know everyone will tear it apart and tell you otherwise, but that is how I had SUCCESS taking off.
Aug 10, 2014, 08:25 AM
An itch?. Scratch build.
eflightray's Avatar
A lot will depend on the 'runway', rough surfaces and small wheels will always be a problem.

Next is wheel alignment. Some say parallel, some say slight toe-in, some toe-out. If adjustable try each. Even how well the wheels spin on their axles, or if they rub on the leg with a little side load. Also check the tail wheel for alignment.

A good straight 'shove' on a smooth surface will often show up any natural tendency to turn on its own, (not powered, just say 'vroooom' if you have to have a noise ).

The actual real take-off will be down to practice, practice, practice, as rarely do each take-off exactly follow the previous one. Even the same model with two different fliers will probably act differently, there are just so many variables, (including the wind, gusts, etc).
Aug 10, 2014, 06:59 PM
http://www.sgvhumane.org/
cmdl's Avatar
https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...1&postcount=72
Aug 10, 2014, 07:23 PM
Registered User
xmech2k's Avatar
Our models fly a lot like the full scale planes. Google it and see what 'real' (I use the term loosely!) pilots do:

http://www.taildraggers.com/Document...x?page=Takeoff

Be ready to exercise that left thumb!
Aug 10, 2014, 08:57 PM
Power Glide
PRNDL's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by eflightray
A lot will depend on the 'runway', rough surfaces and small wheels will always be a problem.

Next is wheel alignment. Some say parallel, some say slight toe-in, some toe-out. If adjustable try each. Even how well the wheels spin on their axles, or if they rub on the leg with a little side load. Also check the tail wheel for alignment.

A good straight 'shove' on a smooth surface will often show up any natural tendency to turn on its own, (not powered, just say 'vroooom' if you have to have a noise ).

The actual real take-off will be down to practice, practice, practice, as rarely do each take-off exactly follow the previous one. Even the same model with two different fliers will probably act differently, there are just so many variables, (including the wind, gusts, etc).

Good advise especially practice a lot. I've found from my own experience that you need more speed before lift off than for any other type of plane and be prepared to use right rudder once in the air....not right aileron.
Aug 11, 2014, 04:23 AM
Punching holes in clouds
MatZeRO's Avatar
Practice and use the rudder. Also don't slam the power on, let it build up.
Aug 11, 2014, 11:07 AM
Registered User
First, let's define what we are talking about. I presume that you are talking about rolling take-offs from the ground (ROG), not handlaunching. And that you are talking about tail draggers, not tricycle gear like the T-28.

First, nose-overs. On take-off, nose -overs usually occur at two points: one is initial attempt at movement when something, usually a clump of grass, a rock, or a crack in the pavement, prevents one or both of the wheels from rolling. The obvious solution is to take care where you position the plane for the start of it's take-off. Once you have placed the plane in position, move it back and forth a little to make sure there is nothing holding it from rolling forward. The second is when the plane has started moving and it hits something in it's path before it has enough speed (momentum) to overcome the obstacle. Once again its a matter of making sure the plane is placed in a path that won't hold a hazard to it. If you move the landing gear forward by about 1" by bending the struts of fixed gear or using spacers at the back of retract assemblies, you will greatly reduce any tendencies for nose overs.

Second, torque roll. Most tail draggers will have a tendency to pull to the left as they accelerate. This is countered by right rudder. As soon as the plane leaves the ground this tendency disappears, so you have to be prepared to quickly return the rudder to neutral. However, pusher planes will try to turn right, and there are some tractor tail draggers that will do so also (the PZ SE5a is a fine example). Do a couple of practice take-off attempts, but stop shy of actual lift off. Get a feel for what you plane will do and prepare a strategy. Years ago I had one plane that you simply could not straighten out on the ground. It would do a 90* right hand turn before taking off. My solution was to aim it 90* left of my intended take-off path. It would do it's 90* turn and take-off in the direction that I wanted for it.

Third - stalls: You MUST make sure that your plane has enough speed to sustain flight when it clears the ground. Go to a small airport and watch real planes, Cubs, Pipers, etc. take off. once they clear the ground they continue in a very gentle climb until they build up some additional speed. Do this with your tail draggers. Once they clear the ground, purposefully keep them skimming the ground for an additional 50ft or so to allow them to build up speed, then climb out.
Aug 11, 2014, 09:40 PM
Registered User
E-Challenged's Avatar
Nose overs: If possible bend landing gear legs so that the axles of wheels are in line with the leading edge of wing. Have wheels slightly and equally toed-in.Give up elevator during start of takeoff run to hold tail wheel down on runway and to aid in steering. Release up elevator and let tail rise after plane has gathered some speed. Control swerve to Left: Give gentle nudges of right rudder as needed to keep model tracking straight as speed builds. Takeoff Speed: Let model accelerate to a little over 3/4 throttle and let it lift off when it is ready in a shallow climb with little or no up elevator input!!!! Keep the nose from pointing upward too much and stalling with gentle down elevator pressure. Let model climb to at least 50 feet altitude before turning. Make gently banked turns using ailerons, plus rudder and elevator inputs as needed for graceful level turns to hold altitude. Level off for cruising flight at around 1/2 throttle.
Use full throttle as needed for aerobatic maneuvers. You may need to hold down elevator pressure for level flight at full throttle. All this advice assumes that you have the CG and right and down thrust and control throws set correctly for your model. I have most trouble with smooth consistent landings but you didn't ask about landings.
Aug 11, 2014, 10:05 PM
Son's Ground Crew
Vortrog's Avatar
All very good advice. E-Challenged's post reads like a textbook and you will never go wrong with that procedure.

The only thing I would add, is that if your model likes cruising at half throttle, half throttle might be where you start your takeoff, and then graduate up to 3/4 throttle as is starts to taxi.
The reason I say that is because some models cruise at 1/3 throttle (like my Fw190 with 4S) so to start takeoff at 1/2 throttle is way to fast and will pull way more left.
Last edited by Vortrog; Aug 11, 2014 at 10:12 PM.


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