Handling your electric airplane SAFELY - Page 4 - RC Groups
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This thread is privately moderated by Xpress.., who may elect to delete unwanted replies.
Jul 30, 2014, 11:48 PM
**** this ****
Somethin' Extra's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Perrone
I tried setting throttle cut on my DX6i; the only options are INH (off) and ACT (activated). There's not a "switch" menu item.

When I depress the Throttle Cut button (top right next to aileron hi/lo rate switch), it inhibits the throttle control. But ONLY while I depress the button.

I would have preferred if it was sticky, ie, you push it in and release it, throttle is inhibited. To enable, push in and release again. Any way around this, other than buying a DX7/8/9?

Regards
Go buy a simple toggle on/off switch and replace the button with the switch via soldering iron.

Best $4 I ever spent.
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Jul 31, 2014, 05:11 AM
Gravity sucks
I have not modified my transmitter as it still is under warranty. What I did was put in a switch in my model that isolates the receiver and motor from the battery.
As soon as I land my aircraft and taxi it off the runway, I move the throttle to zero and switch off the power on the plane. Then if I knock the stick on the transmitter (which I have done in the past) it doesn't affect the plane. I got the tip from rcgroups, if I could remember the contributor I would give them the credit and provide the link.
Jul 31, 2014, 09:19 AM
Registered User
Most people use the main battery power plug as their "master switch", or an isolating plug. A switch, unless it's really heavy duty (and heavy) may not last last long with the kind of amps our motors typically draw.
Jul 31, 2014, 11:19 AM
**** this ****
Somethin' Extra's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewAussieRCuser
I have not modified my transmitter as it still is under warranty. What I did was put in a switch in my model that isolates the receiver and motor from the battery.
As soon as I land my aircraft and taxi it off the runway, I move the throttle to zero and switch off the power on the plane. Then if I knock the stick on the transmitter (which I have done in the past) it doesn't affect the plane. I got the tip from rcgroups, if I could remember the contributor I would give them the credit and provide the link.
Pffft all my planes came with that installed
Aug 07, 2014, 06:39 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpress..
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Whenever working on your model on the workbench:
Always remove the propeller!
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May be I've got this wrong but ...

Always disconnect battery FIRST! Preferably remove the battery too!

When battery is disconnected and removed the propeller is most likely
pretty harmless.

I once forgot to remove the battery when doing repair and a needle punctured
and short connected the LIPO. Result small fire ... luckily I discovered it before
the plane went up in flames.
Nov 20, 2014, 11:14 AM
Registered User
Robert4613's Avatar
I just read through this entire thread regarding safety. I for one am very big on safety. Most of the accidents that I have seen or heard about (at the work place) was due to someone who was simply not paying attention. (Although there are some who I have to question as to how anyone had allowed them to operate power equipment in the first place). I feel that lack of attention is the biggest reason that accidents happen. Even though I had referenced safety to the work place, I feel that this applies towards model aircraft as well. I'm sure that everyone at one time or another have banged their thumb or finger with a hammer or rock (guilty on both counts), sliced a finger, thumb, or hand with a kitchen or hobby knife (guilty), or other things. BUT, when it comes to my power tools (electric and pneumatic) I have yet to get injured while using these. This is because I am totally aware of my presence (where my hands, arms, legs, feet, etc.) as well as my surroundings (table, floor, deck, roof, etc). Once again, I feel that these types of environments can apply towards model aircraft as well.

To sum this all up, accidents are the result of someone not being aware of, or paying attention of their selves and their surroundings, thus the automatic reaction of a careless action.
Nov 20, 2014, 11:18 AM
Registered User
Robert4613's Avatar
Just to clarify lack of attention, I am also referencing towards the common sense that should apply towards the operation of the equipment, such as not changing out a saw blade while the saw is still plugged in, or changing out a drill bit without unplugging (hand held)or locking out (bench type) the tool first just to give some examples that are home or shop related.
Dec 19, 2014, 05:29 AM
Registered User
Been a while since we've had any prop bites, let's be extra careful out there guys and girls!
Dec 19, 2014, 10:04 AM
**** this ****
Somethin' Extra's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony K
Been a while since we've had any prop bites, let's be extra careful out there guys and girls!
Especially during building new planes
Dec 22, 2014, 09:08 PM
Registered User
trhodes1's Avatar
Good thread. Being new to this I haven't been too aware of safety...I am now and have set up my Futaba with a throttle cut switch, which I will be using. Didn't know there was such a thing even.
Dec 31, 2014, 09:00 AM
Xpress..'s Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLOEY
Always disconnect battery FIRST! Preferably remove the battery too!
Yes, good point. I was assuming you had not powered up the model yet, but yes always make sure your power system is completely disconnected from the battery. Not everybody knows of that.

----------------

Handling big electric airplanes always mandates extra precaution. I have an 88" Yak 54 50CC that is electric and every time I power that model up is always from behind, and I'm always standing directly in front of the elevators to keep the model restrained so that I can quickly unplug it in the event of a sudden spool up. 3500 watts is a lot of power, especially swinging a 24x12 wooden propeller. The nose of the model is always facing away from people during power up and power down procedures. I have my throttle kill switch on a rotary dial so that I can't accidentally bump it in flight.
Latest blog entry: Multiplex FunCub XL!
Jan 01, 2015, 05:40 AM
Registered User
Robert4613's Avatar
Now that CHRISTMAS has come and gone I'm sure that many of us have gotten a new plane from Santa. So I'm sure that there will be an increase of accidents here in the next few months while people are getting excitedly ready to fly their new planes.

My 11 yo step son had gotten a Champ for Christmas from his mother, and despite the numerous times that I have taught him the various aspects of safety he still powers it up and plays with it in the house. I'm afraid that he will be one of those people who can't be told about safety until he experiences an accident. Let's all be diligent on teaching Safety.
Jan 03, 2015, 10:40 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpress..
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Handling big electric airplanes always mandates extra precaution.
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In my view it's wise to start this hobby with small planes (park size or less)
because most of us will violate safety rules and make serious mistakes at least
once ...

Just handling LiPo's may be a new world for most. It's easy to puncture
these lightweight cells with a screwdriver e.g. and the result may be fatal
Jan 03, 2015, 01:40 PM
Heli's rule!
dacaur's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by FLOEY
In my view it's wise to start this hobby with small planes (park size or less)
because most of us will violate safety rules and make serious mistakes at least
once ...

Just handling LiPo's may be a new world for most. It's easy to puncture
these lightweight cells with a screwdriver e.g. and the result may be fatal
You have that backward.... you should be a lot more worried about "parkflyers" than about puncturing a lipo with a screwdriver ..

Thinking parkflyer planes are "safe" is a mistake. I had 6 tendons in my arm (the ones for all my fingers) cut by a "parkflyer" prop pulling only 24 amps.... I would rather get hit by a wood prop on a nitro plane than a plastic prop on an electric plane... the damage to myself would certainly be a lot less...

On the other hand, stick a screwdriver through a lipo, and your hand may get burned, and if done indoors you will have thousands of dollars in smoke damage, but the risk to your life is minimal.... maybe if you are holding the screwdriver in your mouth, and inhail the fumes and pass out, you might die in the ensuing fire.... so the lesson here, don't hold screwdrivers in your mouth around lipo's!
Jan 05, 2015, 01:40 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacaur
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Thinking parkflyer planes are "safe" is a mistake. I had 6 tendons in my arm (the ones for all my fingers) cut by a "parkflyer" prop pulling only 24 amps....
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OK less than 9" slow flyer prop

It's easy to do mistakes. I fooled around with a E-sky CP-belt heli once.
Flipping accidentally the throttle hold ... I was lucky it just stripped the
main gear for some teeths. Wrong setting of ESC (hard start).

Warned a pal with a similar heli about it! Despite the warning he managed to cut himself and destroyed a PC monitor

He still fly helis ... I went over to small 25" wingspan (max 8" prop) planes and EDF.