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This thread is privately moderated by Xpress.., who may elect to delete unwanted replies.
Jun 20, 2014, 02:53 PM
An itch?. Scratch build.
eflightray's Avatar
Xpress, perhaps you could also include recommendations on safe flying. Safety isn't just about personal injury, but should cover all the things you should consider when flying.

There may be 'variations' on what 'safe flying' actually means, as in some previous threads when it was raised, some referred to the discussion as 'the fun police' wanting to spoil things.

Sadly, recommendations, even rules and regulations seem to one of those 'pick and choose' things by some, even totally ignored by a few. But safe flying helps the hobby for all users.
As an example, look at some of the bad press that has been created in the media by a few inconsiderate FPV fliers, (now almost every RC plane is called a 'drone' in the media).

Safety will keep the hobby alive, without too many government restrictions.
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Jun 20, 2014, 03:46 PM
Team Hitec, Customer Support
Xpress..'s Avatar
I didn't specifically want to bring flying into this thread as it is just to educate on handling your model directly, not by remote
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Jun 25, 2014, 09:50 AM
http://www.sgvhumane.org/
cmdl's Avatar
i second eflightray's suggestion for all the reasons he states.

ps - unless you feel beginners don't have much chance in getting past the setup phase
Jun 25, 2014, 11:23 AM
Team Hitec, Customer Support
Xpress..'s Avatar
If you guys feel so compelled, then by all means feel free to make a 'Flying your model airplane safely' thread
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Jun 25, 2014, 11:37 AM
http://www.sgvhumane.org/
cmdl's Avatar
i could be wrong but i think we just made suggestions. if we wanted to start our own threads i'm sure we would have done so already. we were just trying to add value to your thread.
Jun 25, 2014, 12:03 PM
Redacted per NSA "suggestion"
dedStik's Avatar
To add to cmdl's last post, not that we don't think there is value in the message already.

Those in the hobby for any length of time know the dangers present, beginners not so much as these things look pretty harmless.
Jun 25, 2014, 12:46 PM
Team Hitec, Customer Support
Xpress..'s Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmdl
i could be wrong but i think we just made suggestions. if we wanted to start our own threads i'm sure we would have done so already. we were just trying to add value to your thread.
No, it's not wrong, it's just that this thread specifically deals with handling your model airplane directly- not actually flying it. Flying your airplane is something different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dedStik
Those in the hobby for any length of time know the dangers present, beginners not so much as these things look pretty harmless.
To expand upon this, I find that it is almost never a beginner that makes a mistake. It's always those of us who are very content, very comfortable with being around electric aircraft that often find ourselves getting hurt the easiest. We are just so accustomed to being around them that sometimes we get careless and that's when it tends to turn around and bite us in the keister. In the rough words of my clubs president, "Beginners are so scared often times that they never make a mistake, they're too focused on not getting hurt." And that's what we should be proactively doing is focusing on handling our airplanes in the safest manner possible. Turning the transmitter on first, off last, arming the airplane with the propeller facing away from us, and never crossing the propellers path when the motor is armed.

You might look completely goofy or downright silly, but when it comes to safety it's not about a fashion statement.
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Jun 27, 2014, 11:19 AM
Registered User

Safety with electric


Great message! As a retired safety person from 42 years in the USAF I've seen my share of "Accidents". Glad to see so many people want to promote SAFETY. LETS ALL HAVE FUN AND NOT GET HURT!
Jun 27, 2014, 12:46 PM
Built For Comfort
Tepid Pilot's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpress..
. . . I find that it is almost never a beginner that makes a mistake. It's always those of us who are very content, very comfortable with being around electric aircraft that often find ourselves getting hurt the easiest.
Is it? Really? Waaaay back in the eighties when I was a "beginner", in the daze of Astro Flight Cobalt motors and nicads I made it a practice without fail to remove the prop when making any and every adjustment to the flight surfaces when the receiver was armed.

Still do.

Without fail remove the prop when you adjust the flight surfaces. It you don't you're only lookin' for your own blood.

TP
Jun 27, 2014, 12:58 PM
Team Hitec, Customer Support
Xpress..'s Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepid Pilot
Is it? Really? Waaaay back in the eighties when I was a "beginner", in the daze of Astro Flight Cobalt motors and nicads I made it a practice without fail to remove the prop when making any and every adjustment to the flight surfaces when the receiver was armed.
Yes. You almost always see a mistake being made by someone who's comfortable around the airplane. It's not unheard of to see a beginner make a major mistake, but it's not very often, certainly not as often as us seasoned pilots. Sometimes you just go into la la land chatting with a fellow club member and unconsciously make a decision. That is why the first thing I do when I land is lock the throttle in the idle position, and then disconnect the battery from the ESC.

Quote:
Without fail remove the prop when you adjust the flight surfaces. It you don't you're only lookin' for your own blood.
Always, either that or disconnect the motor from the ESC. Either way, you render the power system almost harmless.
Last edited by Xpress..; Jun 27, 2014 at 01:04 PM.
Jun 28, 2014, 11:37 PM
Heli's rule!
dacaur's Avatar
Great post, I just have one problem with it.

Whenever bench testing a power system, have someone hold the model and point the airplane away from you- always stand behind the prop!


If you read my blog, you will see what can come of someone holding a plane while bench testing a power system. Luckily it was me that was holding the plane and not someone else....

I was definitely behind the prop by a good 6 inches. At full throttle the nose of the plane broke and the prop swung around and got me.

IMO, it should read something like "You should secure the model to the bench for testing, if that's impossible and you must have someone hold it, make sure they are holding it as far from the prop as possible (i.e. grab the tail, not the cockpit)"
Jun 28, 2014, 11:59 PM
Team Hitec, Customer Support
Xpress..'s Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by dacaur
Great post, I just have one problem with it.

Whenever bench testing a power system, have someone hold the model and point the airplane away from you- always stand behind the prop!


If you read my blog, you will see what can come of someone holding a plane while bench testing a power system. Luckily it was me that was holding the plane and not someone else....

I was definitely behind the prop by a good 6 inches. At full throttle the nose of the plane broke and the prop swung around and got me.

IMO, it should read something like "You should secure the model to the bench for testing, if that's impossible and you must have someone hold it, make sure they are holding it as far from the prop as possible (i.e. grab the tail, not the cockpit)"
Edited, thanks for the suggestion.
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Jul 01, 2014, 11:34 AM
Where did that tree come from
kid at 55's Avatar
One feature I like and used with my DX8 is it have the throttle alarm setup so that when I power up my TX it will alarm if the throttle is no in the off position. Also I have my throttle cut set up on my gear switch, that also have an alarm that tell me if the throttle cut switch is in the power hot position when I power up the TX.
Jul 01, 2014, 03:57 PM
Mile High Club
RCcolorado's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kid at 55
One feature I like and used with my DX8 is it have the throttle alarm setup so that when I power up my TX it will alarm if the throttle is no in the off position. Also I have my throttle cut set up on my gear switch, that also have an alarm that tell me if the throttle cut switch is in the power hot position when I power up the TX.
Same with the dx9 and I love it! Probably has saved me a few interesting power ons

Quote:
Utilize a THROTTLE LOCK on your transmitter- most modern radio systems will be capable of doing this one way or another. Get into the habit of turning it on before you power up your model to keep you from bumping the throttle stick.
Where can I find the throttle LOCK on a dx9 or for that matter any of the similar spektum t/x's? I have lightly bumped the throttle on a few occasions having the plane start to slowly taxi away from me before I can react. This would be a huge benefit.
Jul 01, 2014, 05:11 PM
Team Hitec, Customer Support
Xpress..'s Avatar
Every radio has a different way of locking the throttle position all the way down at idle. My Hitec Optic 6 has a dedicated button to locking the throttle.

You should consult your owners manual or the Radios section here on RC Groups on how to setup a throttle lock.
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