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Jun 02, 2014, 11:21 PM
Balsadustus Producerus
Just remembered--there is a group of modellers in the UK having entirely too much fun imitating old radios and how they worked, but using new, modern, parts and components, while still simulating how the escapement and reed systems worked:

Phil and Shaun's Single Channel and Vintage R/C page...

http://www.mccrash-racing.co.uk/sc/

Check that site out, especially the videos--those guys are having a blast. And, they will have more pictures and videos soon as there is another PANDAS meet at Pontefract this weekend. If I had the money and time to attend...sigh
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Jun 03, 2014, 08:19 AM
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Jim Kraft's Avatar
Well said Balsabird. I think what it boils down to for me is would you rather see a '32 Ford or a new Ford. An old Stearman or a new turbo prop Piper. Could be my age. LOL. It is just that the new cookie cutter designs don't do much for me anymore.

Years back everyone had their own idea of what would make a good plane or engine. After many years people tend to copy others to where things kind of merge into looking very much alike.

But like you, I think that people should find what they like in the hobby and go for it. Not that straying off from the thing you do is not also fun. The older I get the more fun I have in building the old designs with old materials. But that is just me. And vintage to one person may be different than to another.
Jun 03, 2014, 10:27 AM
Brighto?
Mike Denest's Avatar
As Balsabird mentioned, in VR/CS Concours, the emphasis is on the airplane, not the radio. For those with the ability to resurrect old radios, we have the Technical Achievement award. VR/CS encourages modelers to build, fly and enjoy vintage R/C designs using current radios. You can use whatever engine you like as long as it is consistent with the design. Electric power can also be used.
Jun 03, 2014, 11:59 AM
Brighto?
Mike Denest's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balsabird

Haha, I've never noticed it before, but it seems the Vintage R/C Society doesn't have a category for, well, Vintage, specifically. Sort of like the FAA: As an A&P with an Inspection Authorization, I'm required to maintain full-size airplanes in an airworthy condition, but they don't define what 'airworthy' means
Uhh, airworthy is defined in 14 CFR 3.5, 14 CFR 21.183 and in FAA Order 8130.2G. We get that beat into our heads at each refresher meeting. It can also be found on a Standard Category airworthiness certificate.

Back to VR/CS. Yeah vintage isn't specifically defined but is meant to encompass all airplanes designed for radio control from 35 years prior while SAM airplanes are free flight designs converted to R/C. All modelers are encouraged to attend a VR/CS event and fly what you brought. As I tell folks at the WRAMS and Toledo show, the only thing VR/CS sells is a newsletter and a good time.
Last edited by Mike Denest; Jun 03, 2014 at 12:04 PM.
Jun 03, 2014, 02:31 PM
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Captain Dunsel's Avatar
Quote:
Well said Balsabird. I think what it boils down to for me is would you rather see a '32 Ford or a new Ford. An old Stearman or a new turbo prop Piper. Could be my age. LOL. It is just that the new cookie cutter designs don't do much for me anymore.
Why is it either one or the other? How about the '32 Ford body, but with newer brakes, engine, safety glass, and SEAT BELTS? Likewise, a Buzzard Bombshell, but with a modern 4-stroke (or electric) and a modern radio? Same classic looks, but more reliable innards.

(I'm old enough to have driven before seat belts were mandatory; my first car was a 10-year old '62 T-Bird. I spun it on an icy highway in NJ one winter. Never lost my grip on the wheel, but my behind was touching the rear seat when the T-Bird stopped spinning.).

CD
Jun 03, 2014, 06:38 PM
Registered User
Jim Kraft's Avatar
It does not have to be one or the other CD. But when you put a Corvette engine in a 32 Ford it becomes a super modified. You can do the same with any old timer and put a modern engine in it. If the engine does not matter to you then put in what ever you want. There are no rules as long as it is not competition. Many like to fly the old designs with new four strokes, and I have even flown my Play Boy with a Saito 56 for fun. It has also had three different spark motors in it. To me a Stearman with a turboprop is just not right. I love those old radials just like I like old sparkers. But again, there are no rules. If electric turns you on I'm good with that. To each his own.
Jun 03, 2014, 08:31 PM
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Captain Dunsel's Avatar
Quote:
It does not have to be one or the other CD.
Can't argue with that!

CD
Jun 04, 2014, 10:36 AM
Balsadustus Producerus
Mike Denest, thank you for the reminder.

I corrected my last entry dated 3June 2014 in accordance with F.A.R. 43:9.

Sorry, couldn't pass that up
Jun 04, 2014, 05:14 PM
Cheerio's & 100LL
GraemeEllis's Avatar
Forgive my ignorance in the topic;

I just finished an early 1960's Sig R/C Sport, one of their first "Designed for R/C" models, from an original vintage kit.
Does having built it from an original kit add any "authenticity" to it, vs downloading a plan set, and cutting new balsa from scratch?
Jun 06, 2014, 05:22 AM
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Monza Red's Avatar
[QUOTE=Balsabird;28545067]As a Vintage Radio Control Society EC member, I would be remiss if I didn't post this to a direct question about what we do:

WHAT AIRCRAFT ARE ELIGIBLE? (Revised and Effective 1/1/08)
Any model airplane that employed radio control and was kitted, published or flown (attested to by the builder) and falls into one of the following classifications:

Pioneer: Prior to January 1, 1955
Classic: Prior to January 1, 1965
Nostalgia: 35 years old prior to the first of each calendar year.

As lifted off the VR/CS website:

http://vintagercsociety.org/

Well if 35 year-old designs are eligible, stand by for a lot of foam winged, film covered stuff turning up at vintage events!
Jun 06, 2014, 08:09 AM
Brighto?
Mike Denest's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraemeEllis
Forgive my ignorance in the topic;

I just finished an early 1960's Sig R/C Sport, one of their first "Designed for R/C" models, from an original vintage kit.
Does having built it from an original kit add any "authenticity" to it, vs downloading a plan set, and cutting new balsa from scratch?
It's not really specific but if I was judging your aircraft, I would say yes to its authenticity. An example is I have a Taurus that was framed up in 1966 then stored in the rafters of the builders basement. I know this because I saw it there. Years later after it was shuttled around several fellow members basements, I acquired it and finally flew it in 2012, 46 years after it was built.
Jun 06, 2014, 08:10 AM
Brighto?
Mike Denest's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Monza Red
Well if 35 year-old designs are eligible, stand by for a lot of foam winged, film covered stuff turning up at vintage events!
We're working on that.
Jun 12, 2014, 07:51 PM
Bellanca Kruesair
epoxyearl's Avatar
I'm an old Street Rodder....Now that most of the original steel cars are going belly-up., I don't have a problem with the fiber-glass replacements.

Deuce Ford Roadsters can be bought as kits or "ARF's" if you will,, for little more than $30k..

That all has a bearing on this thread..."Repros" can't compete with originals, but they can look as good...Build your model with any materials you choose, and as many flight controls as you wish....In the air, you'll get a satisfaction similar to the original.
It won't be 'legal', but that isn't your point, here.
Latest blog entry: Ban Birds.
Jun 12, 2014, 11:04 PM
Registered User
I've flown my vintage models for years with mid 60s to early 70s digital proportional transmitters, using modern Futaba R114 receivers and servos. All on 27mhz without perfect reliability without a glitch. Adds to the complete vintage experience flying that Heathkit with Bonner sticks or Citizenship 5 channel.

Russ Farris
Jun 12, 2014, 11:08 PM
Registered User
[QUOTE=Monza Red;28575511]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Balsabird
As a Vintage Radio Control Society EC member, I would be remiss if I didn't post this to a direct question about what we do:

WHAT AIRCRAFT ARE ELIGIBLE? (Revised and Effective 1/1/08)
Any model airplane that employed radio control and was kitted, published or flown (attested to by the builder) and falls into one of the following classifications:

Pioneer: Prior to January 1, 1955
Classic: Prior to January 1, 1965
Nostalgia: 35 years old prior to the first of each calendar year.

As lifted off the VR/CS website:

http://vintagercsociety.org/

Well if 35 year-old designs are eligible, stand by for a lot of foam winged, film covered stuff turning up at vintage events!
I've flown my E-powered Babcock Aeronca Champ, Testor's Skyhawk and Ranger 42 at VRCS meets and everyone loved them. They are part of modeling history as much as any of them - look at the old magazines.


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