Ryan Pt-20A aka Ryan ST-3 - RC Groups
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May 20, 2014, 11:00 PM
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Ryan Pt-20A aka Ryan ST-3


This 3 view is from the July 1941 Flying Aces magazine.
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May 21, 2014, 06:41 AM
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md6364's Avatar

Ryan PT 22


Obviously, the Ryan PT 20 and PT 22 must have been related. An older R/C flying buddy who just passed away a year or so back, related many flying stories to us younger guys at the Flying Field. At 18 years old (his story) he ferried his B 17 to Europe and flew all the missions required. A part of his training was learning to fly the Ryan PT 22; or, Maytag Messerschmitt, as he called it! Another airplane I am attracted too.

RYAN PT-22 RECRUIT

Posted 3/25/2014 Printable Fact Sheet

Primary trainers represented the first of three stages of military flight training -- primary, basic and advanced. Prior to 1939, the Air Corps relied entirely on biplanes as primary trainers, but in 1940 it ordered a small number of Ryan civilian trainers and designated them as PT-16s. They were so successful that the Air Corps then ordered large numbers of improved versions, among them the PT-22. By the time production was completed in 1942, the Air Corps accepted 1,023 PT-22s. In 1942 the U.S. Army Air Forces took 25 additional trainers, originally ordered for the Netherlands.

The PT-22 on display was donated by Mrs. Nickolas A. Romano Jr. and her son, Nicky, of Hampton, Va., in 1969 in memory of her husband who lost his life in Vietnam on July 1, 1968. Chief Warrant Officer Romano had served as an enlisted man in the USAF for 22 years prior to retiring. He then enlisted in the U.S. Army to attend flight school and become a pilot. The airplane was restored by the Department of Aviation Technology, Purdue University.

TECHNICAL NOTES:
Engine: Kinner R-540 of 160 hp
Maximum speed: 125 mph
Cruising speed: 100 mph
Range: 205 miles
Ceiling: 15,400 ft.
Span: 30 ft. 1 in.
Length: 22 ft. 7 1/2 in.
Height: 7 ft. 2 in.
Weight: 1,860 lbs. maximum
Last edited by md6364; May 21, 2014 at 06:59 AM. Reason: Added photos.
May 21, 2014, 09:12 PM
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https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...highlight=ryan

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May 22, 2014, 07:41 AM
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md6364's Avatar
Ryan Primary Trainer Histroy:History:

The Ryan Recruit was the U.S. Army Air Corps' first monoplane primary trainer. Initial testing of a single RYAN S-T-A (Sport-Trainer-A) resulted in an order for 15 more aircraft, re-designated the YPT-16, for evaluation in 1939. Finding this tandem two-seater to be an excellent design, the USAAC ordered a production batch of 30 aircraft, designated the PT-20. In 1941, the Army decided a new more powerful engine was needed to endure the rigors of training new pilots. Ryan Aeronautical replaced the inline engine of the previous version with a Kinner radial engine. The resulting PT-21 was so superior that many PT-16s and PT-20s were upgraded with the new engine, becoming PT-16As and PT-20As.

With flight training programs expanding across the United States, 1,023 more planes were ordered. These had an improved Kinner radial, no wheel spats, and the deletion of the main landing gear fairings. This became the PT-22. The Navy also ordered the Recruits and re-designated them as NR-1s, and the Netherlands ordered 25 Recruits and called them NR-3s. The Navy used these trainers until 1944, and the USAAC would retire the Recruit at the end of World War Two.

Today there are flying examples of each variant to be found across North America. There are also examples operated by warbird enthusiasts in the UK and Australia.

Nicknames: "Maytag Messerschmitt"

Specifications (PT-22):
Engine: One 160-hp Kinner R-540-1 five-cylinder radial engine
Weight: Empty 1,313 lbs., Max Takeoff 1,860 lbs.
WIng Span: 30ft. 1in.
Length: 22ft. 5in.
Height: 6ft. 10in.
Performance:
Maximum Speed: 131 mph
Ceiling: 15,000 ft.
Range: 352 miles
Armament: None

Number Built: ~1273

Number Still Airworthy: 85+
Jul 12, 2014, 01:01 PM
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kdahlhaus's Avatar
Here's a few. I hope to build Peter Rake's PT-22 at some point.
Jul 12, 2014, 05:09 PM
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Thanks for sharing , kdahlhaust

Provides comparative examples of how differently the renders reported on a single prominent Ryan feature, the nature of aft fuselage skinning and shape.

IIRC, first is PT-22 by Karlstrom and appeared in Model Aviation, late 60's early 70's. To my eye, he got the side profile correct but waffled on the top view and shows curved panels where none exist.

Images 2 and 3 appear to be from the MAP series, and do render the feature as it was/is. Can anyone confirm origin?

The last two images appear to from the Triggs effort (PT-22 and STA) and IIRC ,appeared in Air Progress way back in the 60's. Unfortunately they show the aircraft's fuselage outline (and thus shapes!) incorrectly. There is NO Curvature in aft fuselage "cone" of any of the metal Ryan (PT-16, PT-20, ST, STA, STM, PT-22) training aircraft.

Another feature that gets regular shoddy drawing treatment is the cowl panels on the ST (Menasco engine) types. Overall, the Matt effort is fairly accurate, but it too, shows curved side panel lines in the cowl, photos show to be "straight".

Complete Triggs drawings here:
http://www.firelightgroups.com/airplane3views/
Mar 05, 2015, 08:22 PM
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coriolan's Avatar

Number Still Airworthy: 84!


Quote:
Originally Posted by md6364
Ryan Primary Trainer Histroy:History:

The Ryan Recruit was the U.S. Army Air Corps' first monoplane primary trainer. Initial testing of a single RYAN S-T-A (Sport-Trainer-A) resulted in an order for 15 more aircraft, re-designated the YPT-16, for evaluation in 1939. Finding this tandem two-seater to be an excellent design, the USAAC ordered a production batch of 30 aircraft, designated the PT-20. In 1941, the Army decided a new more powerful engine was needed to endure the rigors of training new pilots. Ryan Aeronautical replaced the inline engine of the previous version with a Kinner radial engine. The resulting PT-21 was so superior that many PT-16s and PT-20s were upgraded with the new engine, becoming PT-16As and PT-20As.

With flight training programs expanding across the United States, 1,023 more planes were ordered. These had an improved Kinner radial, no wheel spats, and the deletion of the main landing gear fairings. This became the PT-22. The Navy also ordered the Recruits and re-designated them as NR-1s, and the Netherlands ordered 25 Recruits and called them NR-3s. The Navy used these trainers until 1944, and the USAAC would retire the Recruit at the end of World War Two.

Today there are flying examples of each variant to be found across North America. There are also examples operated by warbird enthusiasts in the UK and Australia.

Nicknames: "Maytag Messerschmitt"

Specifications (PT-22):
Engine: One 160-hp Kinner R-540-1 five-cylinder radial engine
Weight: Empty 1,313 lbs., Max Takeoff 1,860 lbs.
WIng Span: 30ft. 1in.
Length: 22ft. 5in.
Height: 6ft. 10in.
Performance:
Maximum Speed: 131 mph
Ceiling: 15,000 ft.
Range: 352 miles
Armament: None

Number Built: ~1273

Number Still Airworthy: 85+
Harrison just crashed his Ryan PT-22 in Venice,CA. He's OK but the plane is damaged
Mar 06, 2015, 09:27 AM
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Pat Daily's Avatar
This is the plane that crashed yesterday in California with actor Harrison Ford flying it. All over the news today.
Mar 08, 2015, 03:02 PM
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Good flying and taxiing shots of a couple of PT-22's. IIRC, these are flying from grass airstrip in England. Have to appreciate the long shock travel visibly evident as the aircraft negotiate the undulating terrain!

Ryan PT-22 Recruit (7 min 23 sec)


Kinner 5 cyl. engines have a VERY unique sound.
Sep 20, 2016, 09:03 PM
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Paul Matt ST -A

Generally pretty good dimensions, outlines, and shapes. Might want to check photos of upper cowl panel line(side view) and in front view, the actual shapes of wheel "pants". Correct accordingly?
Sep 21, 2016, 11:20 AM
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Does anyone have a good picture of the manufacturers data plate for the Ryan ST-A or PT-22?
Dec 09, 2016, 09:46 AM
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Ryan low wing trainers were so advanced for their time, yet are actually much simpler than generally perceived. This photo and 3-view is from a War time aviation industry text booklet, published by US Navy dept. It shows fuselage sections from largest to smallest. All are ellipses and can be determined with a draftsman's ellipse template. Those forward appear to be 45 deg, while at extreme aft, 25%. A basic ellipse ht of 39"(constant section) is taken from Matt's ST effort above. A basic explanation of ellipse ratios is found here: http://www.techdrawingtools.com/16/l1601.htm
All in all, a relatively simple fuselage to draw and loft, etc., with a relatively high degree of accuracy, EVEN without CAD!
Nov 10, 2017, 04:38 PM
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The STA based trainers were a different bird from the later PT-22 planes. Besides the wing sweep, which was done to make the plane a little less stable in flight, the PT-22 was a bigger plane, and was made out of heavier material. I flew, as a civilian, both the
Ryan PT-22 and a Ryan STM, modified to be a regular STA; mainly by removing the external stiffeners under the cockpit, and reducing the size of the cockpit opening. Great fun to fly.
Nov 11, 2017, 08:28 AM
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You piqued my interest with term "bigger".
It's my understanding that we are not talking very much. Depending on whose dimensions one consults, the swept wing is 1"-2" greater in span over straight. The rudder of PT-22 is broader than ST. And the fuselage has more shoulder room because of relocated upper longerons. How ever I suspect the same fuselage frames used in ST are also used in PT-22.
Nov 12, 2017, 07:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by packardpursuit
Good flying and taxiing shots of a couple of PT-22's. IIRC, these are flying from grass airstrip in England. Have to appreciate the long shock travel visibly evident as the aircraft negotiate the undulating terrain!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWIgLE695uY

Kinner 5 cyl. engines have a VERY unique sound.
Thank you for that, it was on the day some years ago a friend and I flew (thus avoiding the car parking charge ) the hundred miles or so to the UK 'Shuttleworth Collection' and watched them. As you say, the engine sound is very strange.

About the prettiest aircraft I have ever seen, at about the prettiest airfield I have ever seen too. Warm, sunny most of the day, and an absolute calm, as you can see by the windsock.

So inspired I shortly after purchased an OS 'Sirius' 5 cylinder radial for a model. And now kdahlhaus has provided some decent drawings so I can get on with it.

So calm that the Collection actually flew their 1909 Bleriot XI, the oldest original airframe/engine combination still flying anywhere in the world. Because of it's uniqueness, this was the last time they ever flew a full circuit with it, since then it has just 'lifted the wheels' for a few seconds.
Last edited by Brian435 (Mark Powell); Nov 12, 2017 at 08:19 AM.


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