Custer Channel Wing CCW-1, CCW-2 and CCW-5 - RC Groups
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Feb 09, 2014, 09:23 AM
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Custer Channel Wing CCW-1, CCW-2 and CCW-5


From wikipedia

The Custer Channel Wing was a series of American-built experimental aircraft designs of the 1940s and 1950s incorporating a half-barrel shaped section to each wing.

Willard Custer filed a United States patent in 1929 for a wing design incorporating a semi-circular channel or "half barrel" shape in which an engine was to be fitted in pusher mode. Custer claimed that this layout, the channel wing, which gave STOL operating capabilities, resulted in a design "which is an aircraft not an airplane. It does not plane the air to fly, rather it brings the air to the lift surfaces and reduces pressure to fly at 8 to 11 mph"

In most situations an aircraft's lift comes chiefly from the low pressure generated on the upper surface by the locally enhanced higher air velocity. This latter may be the result of the movement of the aircraft through the air or, when lift at low air speeds is important for short take-off performance, produced by engine power. The channel wing, the brainchild of Willard Ray Custer, increased the upper surface velocity in a U-shaped channel formed out of the wing, with a pusher propeller at the trailing edge. This near semi-circular channel laterally constrained the airflow produced by the propeller, even when the aircraft was at rest, producing higher flow velocities than over a conventional pusher wing. The need for wing mounted pusher engines made a pusher twin a natural configuration

Mr. Custer built and flew 3 aircraft, CCW 1, CCW 2, and CCW 5 all of which were twin engined.

Drawing of these a/c are hard to find, but I have followed some leads and am close enough that I feel comfortable sharing what i have already. I will fill out the rest as I get it.
Last edited by TedD60; Feb 09, 2014 at 12:20 PM.
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Feb 09, 2014, 09:24 AM
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Custer CCW-1

The first aircraft to incorporate Custer's concept was the CCW-1 which was fitted with a single-seat and was powered by two 75 h.p. Lycoming O-145 pusher engines. Registered NX30090 in the FAAs experimental category, the sole example first flew on 12 November 1942 during a solo flight that was quite unintentional. Custer, who was a non-pilot, taxied the aircraft in a demonstration for financial backers and it suddenly became airborne. A hard landing followed, and one landing gear collapsed, but this did not dampen his backers' enthusiasm. This aircraft was donated to the National Air and Space Museum and displayed at Silver Hill, Maryland.

The CCW-1 was test flown by Frank D. Kelley, who would become a partner in the National Aircraft Corporation with Custer. The Channelwing concept was demonstrated with scale wind tunnel tests for the Army Air forces in Dayton in June 1944, and again in 1946 with 53 different configurations.










Below is a drawing of the general (VERY general) arrangements of the CCW-1 a/c used by NACA for wind tunnel testing reports.

Last edited by TedD60; Feb 09, 2014 at 12:15 PM.
Feb 09, 2014, 09:24 AM
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from wikipedia

Custer CCW-2

This was an evolution of the CCW-1 as a single-seat test bed and used an adapted uncovered fuselage of a Taylorcraft BC-12 light aircraft, replacing the single engine with two pusher engines fitted each side of the fuselage and placed within the wing channels. The sole example N1375V first flew on 3 July 1948. It was flown for about 100 hours of testing with take-off and landing being made within 45–65 ft. Despite the claim of "flying better than a conventional aircraft" it was calculated that a stock Piper Cub was more efficient, lifting 18 lbs/h.p. versus the CCW-2s 11 lbs/h.p. The CCW-3 and CCW-4 designations were not used.







BASED ON THE INFORMATION FOUND IN THE WIKIPEDIA ARTICLE, I have attached a drawing of the uncovered fuselage from Taylorcraft's "Instruction Manual B &B12". This might aid in building a model of the CCW-2
Last edited by TedD60; Feb 08, 2016 at 09:55 AM.
Feb 09, 2014, 09:26 AM
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Custer CCW-5

from wikipedia

The Custer CCW-5 was a twin-engined, 5-seat aircraft of pusher configuration, which used a channel wing claimed to enable low speed flight and short take-offs. Two CCW-5s flew, eleven years apart, but the type never entered production.

The aircraft was the third and last of a series of Custer Channel Wing designs.

The need for wing mounted pusher engines made a pusher twin a natural configuration, and for his third channel wing design Custer chose to modify the existing Baumann Brigadier, a 5-seat mid wing pusher twin which itself did not reach production.[3][4]
Rear view taken in 2004 of the second CCW-5 showing the fixing of the pusher engine within the wing channels.

The CCW-5 retained the fuselage and empennage of the Brigadier, but replaced the whole centre section with a pair of channels, starting at roots in the lower part of the fuselage. Only beyond the channels did the conventional wings regain their mid-wing configuration. A 225 hp (168 kW) Continental O-470 flat six engine was mounted on slender vertical and horizontal struts at the centre of each the channels, on the mid-wing line. These drove constant speed pusher propellers. The main undercarriage was much shortened by mounting its legs on the outer part of the channel section; the Brigadier nosewheel was retained.

The first of two CCW-5s flew on 13 July 1953, piloted by Walker Davidson, at Oxnard, California and was reported to have completed its test flying by autumn 1956, when production was scheduled to begin. This did not happen, though a second aircraft flew in June 1964. The delay was partly the result of financial problems, though the CCW-5 performed well below the original estimates, with a maximum achieved speed of 220 mph (354 km/h) compared with an estimated 300 mph (480 km/h). It was claimed that the aircraft could fly under control at 11 mph (18 km/h) and that it could take off with a 1,500 lb (680 kg) load at 70% power in 90 ft (28 m).

The second CCW-5 was finished in 1964 with 260 hp (194 kW) Continental IO-470P engines; it survives and is under restoration at the Mid-Atlantic Air Museum, Reading, Pennsylvania.









General characteristics

Crew: 1
Capacity: 4 passengers
Length: 28 ft 8.5 in (8.750 m)
Wingspan: 41 ft 2 in (12.55 m)
Height: 10 ft 10 in (3.30 m)
Empty weight: 3,000 lb (1,361 kg) design weight
Gross weight: 5,400 lb (2,449 kg) design weight
Fuel capacity: 200 US gal (757 L; 166 Imp gal)
Maximum gross weight: 6,000 lb (2,722 kg)
Landing speed : 15 mph (24 km/h)
Landing and take-off distances: 100 ft (30 m)
Powerplant: 2 Continental O-470-A flat 6-cylinder air-cooled, 225 hp (168 kW) each

Performance

Maximum speed: 220 mph (354 km/h; 191 kn)
Cruise speed: 180 mph (156 kn; 290 km/h)
Range: 1,680 mi (1,460 nmi; 2,704 km)
Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,096 m)
Rate of climb: 3,000 ft/min (15 m/s)



The attached drawings come from a young engineering student, Simon V.D.Bauwede who lives in France. He has built and flown an R/C model of the CCW-5 and is currently working on another. I have attached a vid of him flying his model to give a better idea of what the a/c looks like. The drawings appear here with his permission. Thank you Simon.

Deuxième vol du Custer Channel Wing CCW-5 (3 min 59 sec)
Last edited by TedD60; Feb 09, 2014 at 10:07 AM.
Feb 09, 2014, 10:10 AM
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The following is a list of all patents relative to the Custer Channel Wing a/c

Davidterrell80 has shared the following research. Thanks David!


http://www.angelfire.com/va3/bythefire/ is the "official" Custer Channel Wing site. It includes a patents page.


Date Number Notes
1929 1708720 aeroplane
1947 2424556 multiple propeller wing channel
1947 2428737 with Dr. Louis Crook, boundary layer remover for airplanes
1948 2437684 aircraft having high-lift wing channels
1949 2476482 channeled airplane wing and propulsion means therefor
1950 2510959 airplane with high lift channeled wings
1950 2514478 channel wing airplane
1950 2532481 multiple channel wing airplane
1950 2532482 boundary layer remover for airplanes
1952 2589994 high lift wing channel with movable wing
1952 2611555 jet-propelled aircraft with fuselage lifting channels
1952 2611556 jet-propelled aircraft with lift channels
1954 2665083 jet-propelled channel aircraft
1954 2687262 jet-propelled channel aircraft
1954 2691494 airplane with pressure-balanced wing channels
1955 2721045 jet-propelled aircraft with extendable intake channel
1955 175881 airplane - D71-1 (design patent)
1956 176839 D71-1 (design patent)
1956 2765993 jet-propelled aircraft with channel control means
1964 3123321 aircraft channel wing propeller combination
1967 3319652 discharge orifices
1971 3604663 jet engine thrust enhancer
1972 3650497 jet-propelled channel aircraft
1972 3704842 contoured stack of jet engine with channel wing aircraft
1972 3705700 air flow control means for channel wing aircraft
1974 3806065 adjustable geometry airfoil in channel winged aircraft

We need to hit a patents database, like http://patft.uspto.gov/ and work our way through them/
Mar 08, 2014, 08:20 AM
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is there any rc model available in the market? from the readings, this seems to be a good flyer, just for some reason not a major manufacture plane.
Mar 08, 2014, 11:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigtruck169
is there any rc model available in the market? from the readings, this seems to be a good flyer, just for some reason not a major manufacture plane.
I have not seen a kit of this a/c.

I have been in touch with the designer/builders grandson who has just sent me 3 views of the CCW-1 and CCW-5. Unfortunately the copies he sent are small and a little tough to read. My plan is to have them blown up and scanned. I will post them here as soon as.
May 13, 2014, 07:32 PM
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Attached is a three view drawing of the CCW-1.
This drawing was provided by the Grandson of the Builder of the a/c.

I have not found any reference to a model of this a/c being built. It might be an interesting model.
Last edited by TedD60; May 14, 2014 at 09:12 AM.
May 13, 2014, 07:34 PM
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Attached are two 3 view drawings of the CCW-5.

These were provided by the Grandson of the builder.

More to come.
May 14, 2014, 05:58 PM
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Newton, it seems, was more correct than Burnuleli.
May 31, 2014, 04:43 PM
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Here is another drawing of the CCW-5
Feb 07, 2016, 08:28 PM
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I was pleasantly surprised to find a video which includes footage of the 1:1 Channelwings in flight.

Wingless Wonders (3 min 2 sec)


In the vid, the Channel wings are the second set of a/c discussed.
Last edited by TedD60; Feb 08, 2016 at 09:58 AM.
Feb 08, 2016, 08:50 AM
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Ted,

Took a second look at this thread and spotted something. Back in post #3, you wrote: " I have attached a drawing of the uncovered fuselage from Taylorcraft's "Instruction Manual B &B12". This might aid in building a model of the CCW-2 ,.."

The aircraft frame work in the photos (and video) appears to be a Piper J-2 and not a Taylorcraft fuselage. Both were Taylor designs, however, and may explain the apparent confusion (?).

Anyway, I do enjoy perusing the older threads, from time to time. This one continues to fascinate.
Thanks
Feb 08, 2016, 09:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by packardpursuit
Ted,

...

Back in post #3, you wrote: " I have attached a drawing of the uncovered fuselage from Taylorcraft's "Instruction Manual B &B12". This might aid in building a model of the CCW-2 ,.."

The aircraft frame work in the photos (and video) appears to be a Piper J-2 and not a Taylorcraft fuselage. Both were Taylor designs, however, and may explain the apparent confusion (?).
I am not qualified to make a judgement here.

I only included the drawing of the uncovered fuselage to augment the information found in the Wikipedia article.

I will adjust my comments in that post.

All that being said, the video is pretty amazing.
Last edited by TedD60; Feb 08, 2016 at 09:59 AM.


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