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Mar 03, 2004, 03:20 PM
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tim61's Avatar
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How do I install flying wires....?


Question for all you WWI gurus:

I am building a modified GWS Tiger Moth 400 that I would like to put flying wires on. Now that you are done laughing, what is the best method for doing flying wires on a small biplane? Not structural, just for looks.

Thanks!!!!

Tim
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Mar 03, 2004, 04:18 PM
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vintage1's Avatar
I have seen two methods advocated, and I have to do some rigging soomn as well, on a tiggie.

(i) Peter Rake, the Man Himself, recommends I think lightweight fishing line. This can be tensioned up a bit without straining the airframe.

(ii) shirring elsatic, is what used to be sewn into clothes, to make strecthy waistbands., Its a tiny piece of rubber, covered in cotton, and is very stretchy indeed. The cotton takes paint and looks more like a braided cable than monofilament line.

As far as what its all fastened too - well you can SEW both with a needle hrough balsa, or foam, but you will have to make tiny holes if its ply or spruce you want to anchor to.

Someone else also came up wih the plan of getting tiny fish hooks and cutting off the barbed bit, to leave the eye on a short stem, which would make a useful conection point when epoxied in.

I hope someone else comes up with the definitive method, because I need to do it too!
Mar 03, 2004, 05:45 PM
Designing on the edge
AerodromeRC's Avatar
I have used 0.5mm dia. "Stretch Magic" Bead & Jewelry Cord. It is black rubbery elastic. I stretch it tightly and it permanently reduces it's diameter even more. To attach, I take brass wire used for hanging pictures frames or craft work and fashion eyelets by wrapping a short piece around a nail and twisting the ends together making a shaft. I then CA or epoxy the shaft into a predrilled hole. It is then a simple matter of attaching the cording and pulling until tight. Simple knots or more scale like knots can be made. The rigging is always good looking and never sags.

For functional rigging, I use the same eyelets but substitute Kevlar fishing line. Strong as steel.

Kurt
Mar 03, 2004, 07:19 PM
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tim61's Avatar
Thread OP
Kurt,
Can you elaborate on what a "scale" knot would be?
Thanks,
Tim
Mar 03, 2004, 07:28 PM
Designing on the edge
AerodromeRC's Avatar
Actually, Gerald perfected the technique. Look in his thread on the Tommy Morse Scout. His knots simulated rigging turnbuckles.

Kurt
Mar 03, 2004, 10:28 PM
Registered User
cloudhopper's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by vintage1
[B
Someone else also came up wih the plan of getting tiny fish hooks and cutting off the barbed bit, to leave the eye on a short stem, which would make a useful conection point when epoxied in.
I hope someone else comes up with the definitive method, because I need to do it too! [/B]
I used this method after seeing it as well and its worked out great for over 2 yrs. on one of my planes,I also used a braided fishing line,they look good and are structural anyway
Last edited by cloudhopper; Mar 03, 2004 at 10:46 PM.
Mar 03, 2004, 10:57 PM
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tim61's Avatar
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Thanks! These are great ideas. I really like the ones Gerald did on his Scout.
One lingering question:
Do you attach the lines to the struts by stringing them through small holes in the strut? Gerald refers to tieing them around the strut, but if you do that, how would they not slip up the strut?
Tim
Mar 04, 2004, 03:27 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Simple "sport scale" method


Tim, My favorite method for "Sport Scale" rigging is simple. I use 30 or 40 lb test Kevlar fishing line, such as Spider Wire, because it's imperviouse to changes in temperature or moisture. To rig the model, the string is pulled through predrilled holes with a sewing needle as far as routing allows. Then, start at the next point and repeat the process until all the rigging is in place. This method requires a little planning ahead, but once you get the hang of it, you'll be surprized at how far you can go with one piece of string.
PAT
Mar 04, 2004, 10:16 PM
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Brian T's Avatar
What I used were #10 fish hooks with the hooks cut off...and then went to the wifes frbric store and bought some elastic thread..poof it looks great !

Cheers Brian
Mar 04, 2004, 11:37 PM
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Gerald's Avatar
Quote:
Originally posted by tim61
Thanks! These are great ideas. I really like the ones Gerald did on his Scout.
One lingering question:
Do you attach the lines to the struts by stringing them through small holes in the strut? Gerald refers to tieing them around the strut, but if you do that, how would they not slip up the strut?
Tim
I make my flying wires functional. They are tensioned sufficiently to add strength to the airframe much like the full scale would. I have used lightweight dacron kite line but I think I'll have to try something like this kevlar fishing line these guys are talking about because my wires sometimes sag under conditions of high temperature and humidity.

When attaching to a strut end I usually don't actually tie a knot. Rather I wrap it around twice and freeze it in position with a drop of CA.
Here's a shot of my 1/9 Peter Rake Camel.
(Ughh! I need to dust this thing off before taking pictures .)
Mar 04, 2004, 11:42 PM
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Gerald's Avatar
When there are double flying wires that need to be spaced properly I sometimes tie a separate loop around the pair to draw them closer together like this. The lines on this Camel were painted silver to resemble metal.
Mar 04, 2004, 11:47 PM
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Gerald's Avatar
Where there are no struts, such as at the fin or stab, I just drill a tiny hole, poke the line through the hole and freeze it in with CA. You can harden the end of the line with thin CA to keep it from unraveling and it makes it easier to poke through the hole. Then snip off the end after its through. These lines start at the bottom and thread all the way around through holes the stab and fin and back into the bottom on the other side. Also in this picture you can see the pull-pull control lines for the elevator and rudder
Mar 04, 2004, 11:49 PM
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Gerald's Avatar
I use a different attachment strategy for different locations of anchor points. For lines that attach to the fuselage I pass them through a hole in a solid balsa frame member and knot them on the inside, then CA again. In this case I didn't attach to the landing gear strut because the gear are removable.
Mar 04, 2004, 11:57 PM
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Gerald's Avatar
Little scale-like details like this make a simple model more interesting. Here the wires go cris-cross through holes in the little torpedo shaped wire guide in the center (it is shaped from hardwood dowel).
Mar 05, 2004, 12:24 AM
Registered User
Brian T's Avatar
Gerald,........you win..........


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