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Nov 05, 2013, 11:48 AM
Koo
Koo
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FPV from 100K feet. Actual new footage with OSD info - Coolest videos ever


The person flying is not me and I just found this video on vimeo. I thought it was really cool to see the OSD info and the whole ride down.

The paragraph below doesn't directly relate to these videos but you should still read them

I'm part of a organization at Miami University called Project High Flight and we are planning on doing a similar mission this spring with an RVJET. We have over 10 weather balloon launches under our belts and are this semester we also started working with multicopters and high power rockets.

We are trying to gain more publicity, so if anyone could take a minute and like our facebook page, we would all really appreciate it.



Here is the first video which was uploaded 5 months ago.

(5 min 1 sec)

This one was uploaded less than a month ago and actually goes above 100K feet.

(12 min 2 sec)
Last edited by Koo; Nov 06, 2013 at 02:56 PM.
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Nov 05, 2013, 12:48 PM
It's a job...
747Pilot's Avatar
Cool vids. The osd info in video 1 looks off. The flight timer is off and distance from home too. A balloon launch to that height would take it miles from launch when released, as shown in video 2. I don't find the launching of these so amazing as I do the retrieval.
Nov 05, 2013, 02:08 PM
fly by night
BCSaltchucker's Avatar
I don't see any flying going on though. Does the plane actually detach from the balloon? Just seems to fall out of control all the way, which I find disappointing. All that altitude gained and no fun actually flying through the troposphere, seems a waste to me. of course the challenge of flying it back to the launch site would be a major achievement. He crashed about 5m miles from launch, which is not too far, so probably doable to fly back to launch. IIRC RCxplorer encountered a lot more wind that took him 100km from launch site, but he was able to fly the plane down.
Last edited by BCSaltchucker; Nov 05, 2013 at 02:15 PM.
Nov 05, 2013, 02:14 PM
Koo
Koo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker
I don't see any flying going on though. Does the plane actually detach from the balloon? Just seems to fall out of control all the way, which I find disappointing. All that altitude gained and no fun actually flying through the troposphere, seems a waste to me. of course the challenge of flying it back to the launch site would be a major achievement. He crashed about 5m miles from launch, which is not too far, so probably doable to fly back to launch. IIRC RCxplorer encountered a lot more wind that took him 30km from launch site.
Did you watch the 2nd vid? Considering how good video he had just 300 feet above the ground, I'd say he landed pretty damn close.

Did his battery go empty? Would explain the lack of control in the end
Nov 05, 2013, 02:20 PM
Registered User
Daemon's Avatar
No, he "landed" 33000 ft away from home.
I'm pretty sure the plane (Skyfun) lost control of one of its elevons. Maybe froze the
servo or something. With only one working elevon all he had was vague roll control
and no pitch, thus the perpetual nose down attitude, and seemingly random left/right rolls all the way down.
Probably buried the stick in the corner at the end to slow it down
so it wouldn't pile into the ground at 90mph and managed to get it into a semi-stable
inverted state. Maybe the stuck elevon had a little down in it.

Don't think I've seen a successful FPV piloted glide back to launch from a high altitude
balloon drop yet.
Nov 05, 2013, 02:21 PM
fly by night
BCSaltchucker's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koo
Did you watch the 2nd vid? Considering how good video he had just 300 feet above the ground, I'd say he landed pretty damn close.

Did his battery go empty? Would explain the lack of control in the end
osd says he crashed 33,000 ft from home, which is like 10km from launch.

1280 video should be solid and clear at such distance. RCexplorer had video at 100km from launch!
Nov 05, 2013, 02:43 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCSaltchucker
I don't see any flying going on though. Does the plane actually detach from the balloon? Just seems to fall out of control all the way, which I find disappointing. All that altitude gained and no fun actually flying through the troposphere, seems a waste to me. of course the challenge of flying it back to the launch site would be a major achievement. He crashed about 5m miles from launch, which is not too far, so probably doable to fly back to launch. IIRC RCxplorer encountered a lot more wind that took him 100km from launch site, but he was able to fly the plane down.
Is there enough air density at 100,000 feet to even glide or have any control response?

I find these high altitude recordings to be very interesting, but Im not so sure of the value to the plane itself. As you said, no fun flying around at altitude, It is all little more than a(n apparently ineffective) recovery strategy.

It would be awesome if it could be more though. Not sure if a large glider platform would have any hope of a shallower glide path...
Nov 05, 2013, 02:52 PM
Koo
Koo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bauerbach
Is there enough air density at 100,000 feet to even glide or have any control response?

I find these high altitude recordings to be very interesting, but Im not so sure of the value to the plane itself. As you said, no fun flying around at altitude, It is all little more than a(n apparently ineffective) recovery strategy.

It would be awesome if it could be more though. Not sure if a large glider platform would have any hope of a shallower glide path...
There is an uncontrollable dive until about 50,000-60,000 feet no matter what platform you have because of 99% of the air isn't there. We will use RVJET which has a wingspan of 195cm and will weight around 4-5lbs on launch.

Even though the mission of the person doing the flying wasn't "successful", just seeing the plane drop at 500mph and seeing how fast it came down was really cool for me.
Nov 05, 2013, 02:54 PM
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Daemon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bauerbach
Is there enough air density at 100,000 feet to even glide or have any control response?
No, but you can judge when you've fallen enough to have some control
by watching the airspeed indicator on the left side. Notice that when he's dropping
at 50+ thousand feet per minute (500+mph), the airspeed was only about 50mph.
But once the airspeed rises above the min sink airspeed for that airframe, he should
be able to put it into a reasonable glide. I think one should be able to reasonably
expect to start a controlled return toward home starting at at least 40k feet AGL.

Quote:
It would be awesome if it could be more though. Not sure if a large glider platform would have any hope of a shallower glide path...
He didn't have a glide slope problem, he had a serious control malfunction.
He was only 7.4 miles away from home, and could easily have glided back
from as low as about 10 thousand ft AGL with a horrible glide ratio of 4 to 1,
and I'm sure the Skyfun glides much better than that.
Nov 05, 2013, 03:11 PM
Koo
Koo
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Thread OP
Found this comment on his vimeo:

Quote:
Yes very good guess. I stripped out both servos actually. Right at where they mount ont he arm. I have metal arms for next flt
I guess when we have our mission, finding a way to warm the servos might be a good idea.
Nov 05, 2013, 03:49 PM
JettPilot's Avatar
There is absolutely enough air to start a glide at 80 K plus feet, with full control, the plane just flys faster than normal... Its been done already

Mike
Nov 05, 2013, 04:36 PM
Registered User
Daemon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koo
Found this comment on his vimeo:
I guess when we have our mission, finding a way to warm the servos might be a good idea.
While I do think that a way to keep the servos warm (maybe just cycling them continuously
on the ride up) would be a good idea, what he's saying happened, has nothing
to do with cold. The surfaces may have fluttered at high speed, and that just
tore up the plastic arms and/or gears in the servos. I don't put plastic gears on.. anything,
and certainly would not be smart to do so in an application like this. If he broke
the arms, that's a bit weird, but maybe really thin/cheap arms, when bigger stronger
ones would have done the job. We still use plastic servo arms on 400+mph DS planes,
because metal arms often develop too much slop as they wear.
Nov 05, 2013, 04:36 PM
Registered User
Daemon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JettPilot
There is absolutely enough air to start a glide at 80 K plus feet, with full control, the plane just flys faster than normal... Its been done already

Mike
And yet, all we've ever seen from that mission is a still photo.
Video, or it didn't happen.
Nov 05, 2013, 05:25 PM
UAV Flight Operations Manager
Hitec Karbonite gears are plastic, but are MUCH stronger than the typical plastics found in cheap servo gears. It serves its use there very well. That being said, in a use case where you're expecting to see extreme cold, I would definitely go with metal gears! Most plastics become very brittle when cold.
Nov 05, 2013, 07:38 PM
fly by night
BCSaltchucker's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koo
Found this comment on his vimeo:



I guess when we have our mission, finding a way to warm the servos might be a good idea.
oh my, yeah servo failure can happen to anyone even at 100 feet up. Guess going to the top of the trop is a whole different paradigm


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