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Oct 07, 2013, 05:20 AM
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Maxedout's Avatar
Discussion

Ivan P's KZ4


After spending the better part of the last twelve months reconstructing and rebuilding models previously built by other people I've learn't that it would have been far quicker to have started from scratch. So now that the previous mentioned basket cases have now been completed I'm in the mood to do just that, start from scratch.
Given that I have a large collection of Ivan's plans at my disposal I thought it only right to have some fun and build one of his wonderful creations.
There was no real thought process that went into this choice other than it was literally the first set of plans that came to hand when I grabbed one from the stack.
I also note there hasn't been a build thread done on this subject so game on. Those of you who get the urge to join in on this be warned, I'm no master builder and it wont be a quick build. But I will do my best to document the project from start to finish and hopefully have fun in the process.
Let the build begin.
Jim.
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Oct 07, 2013, 01:15 PM
Slip the surly bonds...
Sopwith Mike's Avatar
Welcome to the wonderful Ivan's world, Jim - I see you are from the right part of the world

Will be watching,

Mike
Oct 08, 2013, 03:40 AM
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Maxedout's Avatar
Thanks Mike, If nothing else it will stand out like a beacon amongst the the sea of soulless foamies at the park.
Given this is my first attempt at a plans built project some wise words from a friend quickly made me realise my battered building board would benefit from a softer surface to pin into. Trying to push T pins into MDF gets tiresome real quick, not to mention the fast forming blister on a thumb. A trip to the hardware to procure a pack of cork tiles and tin of glue became top priority, a quick tiling job on the bench and we're back in business.
Given Ivan's economical use of balsa I've quickly become to appreciate my decision to split the framing sticks from sheet. With the side frame stringers being from the same sheet each side should conform equally to the slight curvature of the fuse.
Oct 09, 2013, 03:21 AM
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Maxedout's Avatar
A bit more visual progress today. The fuselage side frame primary structures mostly finished and joined.
Oct 09, 2013, 11:28 PM
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That came together quick. Should be ready for the park on sunday Looks like a quality job coming together. Well done
Oct 10, 2013, 02:27 AM
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Sunday !!!, I was thinking sooner .
Not as much progress today, I managed to get the top and bottom formers cut ready for the fun of skinning.
Oct 10, 2013, 12:21 PM
Slip the surly bonds...
Sopwith Mike's Avatar
I don't think I've ever seen one of these - though the pictures on Ivan's Plans look really good; a very well-prportioned aircraft.

He will be pleased that someone is making it, and LukeZ will have yet anoither model to add to the ever-growing list!
Oct 11, 2013, 02:45 AM
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Hi Mike

Yes it is an unusual subject which is why it's growing on me, when you tell people what it is it should still have them scratching their heads going Skandinavisk who ?.
Oct 11, 2013, 02:57 AM
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With the compound curves on the underside of the nose I decided to have a crack at planking as trying to sheet that area was going to be a real pain in the posterior.
After having a quick read of Henry Holcombe's how to article on the subject I launched into it.
It certainly was a far more economical use of material as opposed to the waste that would have been necessary with sheeting and I feel it more accurately follows the contours set by the formers.
Oct 11, 2013, 02:13 PM
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Lnagel's Avatar
Nice planking job. I have to agree with you that planking is the way to go with compound curves.

Larry
Oct 11, 2013, 06:31 PM
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Here's a link to Skandinavisk who?

http://www.ole-nikolajsen.com/SAI.pdf

Nice historical pics, including a few of the KZ IV (meaning roman numeral four as opposed to "intravenous" though this is an ambulance aircraft).

KZ stands for Kramme and Zeuten, the two men responsible for the hairyplane. Karl Gustav Zeuten, was a real live, honest to goodness mechanical engineer tho' he was still wet behind the ears when he committed this. He was the man at the draughting board. Viggo Kramme was the man who could weld. He had come out of the shops of "Marinens Flyvevæsen" (Royal Danish Navy Air Service) as an airframe techie. He was also the Director of Kramme og Zeuten A/S who knew just enough about business and finance to be dangerous to the firm. The firms demise came, however, as a result of the crash at Farnborough in 1954(?) of a KZ X, the firms attempt to put the blocks to the Auster AOP and the Cessna Birddog. Talk about hubris!

Only two KZ IVs were built, and only one exists today. It normally sits on the deck in the big hangar at Stauning Aircraft Museum in darkest Jutland, but it is airworthy. Here's a pic of the thing airborne:

http://www.airplane-pictures.net/pho...ate-sai-kz-iv/

But there is no doubt that NZ needs a KZ badly. Astonishing STOL performance. No use in the fjords, of course. The horses were too puny to carry floats.

No need to ask if I love this aircraft, I assume :-0)?

Hej på dej :-)!

Sam
Oct 11, 2013, 06:36 PM
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Maxedout's Avatar
Thanks for the compliment Larry, it's fun when you get it right.
Oct 11, 2013, 06:40 PM
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That's a great link for the historical reference material, many thanks for that Sam.
Oct 11, 2013, 11:24 PM
Registered User
You might like to know that the machine was powered by a pair of DeHavilland Gypsy Major 1C engines (130 HP) that had been kicking around the RDAF hangars since the RDAF had had a baker's dozen Tiger Moths in the 1930s. These spare engines were of no use to the German occupation forces, of course, and the German Reichplenipotentiary, the SS General Werner Best, permitted the use of these engines in the KZ III and IV aircraft for "humanitarian" reasons (as they were designed as ambulances), but really because he was hoping to turn K&Z into a manufacturer of subassemblies for Lufwaffe aircraft. He had been a "procurement specialist" in Poland before he came to Denmark.

If you do the detail of the nacelles according to the detailed drawings of cowlings and nacelles for the T. Moth and for the DeHavilland Dragon (also Gypsy 1C engines) and for that matter for the DH Dragon Rapides (Gypsy 6 engines) that are available, I can guarantee you that no-one will twig to the subterfuge since I'm unlikely to show up in Auckland ;-)

Cheers

Sam

Sam
Oct 12, 2013, 02:50 AM
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Maxedout's Avatar
Brilliant info again Sam, it's contributions and insights like this that help tell an aircrafts story of what would otherwise be forgotten history.
I was wondering what model engines it used, other than the visual clue being the cowlings are definitely DeHavilland. So it was a good guess that I ordered a pair of 1/8 scale Tiger Moth cowlings from Pat Trittle, they should adapt to this model reasonably well.
I see my window's will need a little adjustment to give them a more scale appearance.

Thanks again Sam.

Cheers
Jim.


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