Thread Tools
Apr 18, 2013, 04:34 PM
GPR
GPR
Registered User
GPR's Avatar
Thread OP
Build Log

Lockpat II - Scratch build of a custom Hacker Streamliner


I had been looking for an interesting project for my next build since the spring of 2012, when I was putting the finishing touches on Thunderbird. I actually started work on a 1935 28 ft. Chris Craft triple cockpit runabout. I had seen one at a boat show in Pentwater, MI last summer. That same weekend I ran into Chris Smith, grandson of Christopher Columbus Smith (founder of Chris Craft) at a boat show in Holland, MI, and discussed the boat with him. At his suggestion, I contacted the Mariner's Museum and purchased a set of plans. I was building at 1:6th scale, so the model was going to be 56 inches long. I had the keel laid and was beginning to cut out the frames when I had second thoughts. Even though I had photos of a specific boat to work from, this was a mass produced production boat. So much of the enjoyment from building Thunderbird was because of the unique nature of the boat. I enjoyed researching the design and build process, the history of the designer, builder, owners and the boat itself. The fact that the boat still existed and could be viewed (and ridden in) was the icing on the cake. Even though the Chris was going to be larger than the kit built model from Dumas, many models of this boat have been built. I wanted to build another project with a unique subject not previously modeled.
I was reading a newly acquired copy of Hackercraft by James P. Barry and was struck by the photos and description of John Hacker's 1931 custom design, LOCKPAT II, a 40 ft. streamlined runabout. Less than a week later, I was looking through the latest edition of WoodenBoat magazine and stumbled upon a photo of LOCKPAT II and a notice that she was being offered for sale. The combination of these factors: Hacker design, unique/exotic vessel, local history, still in existence and challenging build elements sealed the deal. I shelved the ChrisCraft and started in on LOCKPAT II.
Last edited by GPR; Dec 22, 2014 at 11:11 AM.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Apr 18, 2013, 05:07 PM
Registered User
GREG- You sure know how to pick’em. The Lockpat III, was not only a one off in the hull design, but the engine, a huge V-12 was also one of a kind. She was at the Buffalo Launch Club regatta a number of years ago and made some speed runs for the fun of it.
Apr 18, 2013, 05:21 PM
GPR
GPR
Registered User
GPR's Avatar
Thread OP

Early History


LOCKPAT II was designed by John Hacker and built by the custom department of the Hacker Boat Company for Dick Locke, former racing driver and owner of the largest independent pattern shop supplying the Detroit automakers at that time. The boat was 40 ft. long and 7 ft. wide. She was equipped with a 600 hp Packard 1A-2025 engine that delivered in excess of 60 mph. Only eleven of these experimental aircraft racing engines were produced by Packard. Of the eleven, two were converted for marine use and Dick purchased one for LOCKPAT II. The engine has 6 Holly downdraft carburetors and numerous custom linkages and weighs 1,670 lbs. The engine was mated to a custom transmission designed for the boat. There were three cockpits; the forward contained steering and seated four, the second also seated four and was covered with removable hatches, and the aft cockpit seated two and could be opened or closed. The mechanic normally rode in the aft cockpit which was connected to the forward cockpit via a phone. Dick Locke had a home in Sans Souci, a community on Harsens Island at the north end of Lake St. Clair where he kept LOCKPAT II in her own boathouse. He reportedly used LOCKPAT II to commute to his office in Detroit in favorable weather. After owning and using LOCKPAT II for a number of years, Dick donated the boat to a charity.
Last edited by GPR; May 13, 2014 at 12:58 PM.
Apr 18, 2013, 05:33 PM
GPR
GPR
Registered User
GPR's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankg
GREG- You sure know how to pick’em. The Lockpat III, was not only a one off in the hull design, but the engine, a huge V-12 was also one of a kind. She was at the Buffalo Launch Club regatta a number of years ago and made some speed runs for the fun of it.
Rich,
Right you are. In fact, you can see the runs here:
Lockpat II at speed, Buffalo Launch Club 2008 (0 min 17 sec)
There are also some other videos of her on YouTube starting and running on the Saginaw River. Just to clarify for everyone, This boat is LOCKPAT II. I believe you mistakenly added a third "I". As you know, LOCKPAT III is a completely different boat, more commonly known as Pardon Me.
Last edited by GPR; Apr 18, 2013 at 05:41 PM.
Apr 18, 2013, 05:51 PM
Registered User
Tim B.'s Avatar
Oooooh Man ...

Here we GO ~
Apr 18, 2013, 06:50 PM
Registered User
Gravman's Avatar
GPR! Looks like another great project. I will be watching with great interest. Does the drive trian of LOCKPAT use a strudder?
Latest blog entry: Myrtle Corey
Apr 18, 2013, 06:57 PM
GPR
GPR
Registered User
GPR's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravman
GPR! Looks like another great project. I will be watching with great interest. Does the drive trian of LOCKPAT use a strudder?
Yes it does. Just one of many challenges presented by this build.
Apr 18, 2013, 06:59 PM
Registered User
You are up to the challenge, Sir! Looking forward to watching another masterpiece in the making!
Apr 18, 2013, 09:28 PM
GPR
GPR
Registered User
GPR's Avatar
Thread OP
The first and obvious challenge was to find plans! I started with the John Hacker archives at The Mariner's Museum. Unfortunately, they did not have plans for LOCKPAT II.
Next, I contacted Doug Morin, whose company, Morin Boats of Bay City, Michigan, is offering LOCKPAT II for sale. I talked with Doug for over an hour. He has spent a lifetime driving, building and repairing fast wooden boats and had some fascinating stories to tell. In fact, Doug's father was also in the boat business, having worked for Ben Huskin in the pattern shop at Huskin Boat and Motor Works. Thunderbird was built at Huskin and Doug said that his father had drawn some of the patterns for Thunderbird. Huskin Boat Works was in business until 1970, when Ben Huskin died.
Doug provided lots of interesting background information on LOCKPAT II. After explaining the unique nature of the original Packard engine and transmission, he filled me in on more of her history.
Later History
About 1955, Dick Locke donated Lockpat II to the Jewish Agency of New York City, who were assisting with the settlement of Jewish refugees in Israel. She was then sold several times before being purchased by Howard Davidson of Long Island. At that time, the original 2025 engine was removed and sold to an aviation collector and replaced with a PT Boat engine. In 1964, David Stephens, of Wisconsin, purchased the boat. The PT Boat engine was very large and had required removal of some deck sections. It was also too heavy, and affected the boat's performance and handling.
Around 2003, Stephens sold LOCKPAT II to Tom Mittler, a wooden boat enthusiast with an extensive collection in Kalamazoo, MI. Through an interesting series of events, the original engine was located and Mittler was able to buy it back for re-installation in LOCKPAT II. He hired Danny Acierno (owner of Long Island Boat and Motor),to recondition and reconstruct the engine. Since the marine conversion had been stripped off the engine, a significant amount of the original work had to be recreated. Doug Morin was hired to remove the old engine and reinstall the reconditioned Packard. As part of the rework the boats original bottom was removed and replaced with a three-ply laminated bottom. Three deck planks were also replaced. In the course of the project, Doug was able to locate and purchase the original construction and lines drawings for LOCKPAT II. The work took several years and was completed in 2008.
Tom Mittler has passed away and now his collection of 19 rare wooden boats valued at $30 Million is being sold off by his widow and sons. Doug Morin is handling the brokerage of the boats, a few at a time. LOCKPAT II is being offered at $2.5 million. Unfortunately, Mittler's heirs are afraid that if a reproduction of LOCKPAT II were to be built it would have a negative impact on the value of the original. Therefore they do not want any plans or photos made available, regardless of the purpose. Unless LOCKPAT II is purchased by someone with a different perspective, the plans will not be available for use in constructing a model. So, how about someone stepping up to the bar to buy this vessel?
Note: Lockpat II was sold to Lee Anderson in 2014. The boat is kept at Lee's museum in Minnesota.
Last edited by GPR; Mar 07, 2015 at 09:12 AM. Reason: Corrections to history.
Apr 18, 2013, 09:52 PM
Registered User
Well, it is a challenge for sure but I know you can make this model happen.
Apr 19, 2013, 12:43 AM
Registered User
GREG- Photo’s , photo’s, and more photos. Take the major measurements for the hull and deck locations and sit down at the drawing board or computer and have at it. There is always more than one way to skin a cat.
Apr 19, 2013, 09:08 AM
GPR
GPR
Registered User
GPR's Avatar
Thread OP
You're right guys, there is always a way if you think about it.
John Hacker designed many boats over the years and, after he got started, quite a number were of the "streamlined" variety. He also was known to carry over elements from one design to another, which makes sense if you are designing as many boats as he did. In 1939 he designed a boat named Curlew which was built by the Canadian boatbuilder Greavette. Like LOCKPAT II, Curlew is streamlined with a torpedo stern and built with a 7 ft. beam, although Curlew is 7 ft. shorter than LOCKPAT II, at 33 Feet. Unlike LOCKPAT II, Curlew's deck is traditionally planked with fore/aft straight planks and white caulking, and their deck and cockpit arrangements are very different. Nevertheless, the bow and stern shapes, and section profiles are very similar, except that LOCKPAT II has a ridge down the center of her decks and Curlew's decks are flat. My good friend, Jack Kipfer, produced a beautiful model of Curlew which won Best in Class and Best Finish at the 2010 Toledo Show. Here are some photos of Curlew on display at the 2013 WRAM Show.
Last edited by GPR; Feb 27, 2014 at 10:03 AM.
Apr 19, 2013, 10:38 AM
GPR
GPR
Registered User
GPR's Avatar
Thread OP
In 2003, the Canadian Antique and Classic Boat Society took lines off Curlew and created a drawing which was made available to the public for a period of time. Through my friends here http://groups.yahoo.com/group/classicwoodenboatmodels/ I got a copy of the plans. The plans were drawn in 1/12th scale, but I enlarged them to 1:8th scale. The finished model of LOCKPAT II will then be 60 inches long. The lines for Curlew became an excellent starting point for creating lines for LOCKPAT II.
I kept the bow and stern sections very much the same, except that I created a ridge down the center of the decks. The additional 7 feet was added amidships with two additional stations. The process was not as straightforward as it might seem. It was really quite tricky to get the stations designed so that fair curves result in all 360 degrees and so that the overall profile is pleasing to the eye. In fact, it was necessary to modify other stations in order to get the overall transition to work out. The process started on the drawing board with the creation of sections that seemed to flow from the existing design. The real work took place after the frames were set to the keel. Using a faring batten, frame profiles were adjusted in or out, with many iterations required to tweak each frame profile to achieve the desired effect.
Last edited by GPR; Apr 21, 2013 at 04:24 PM.
Apr 19, 2013, 11:35 AM
Registered User
Gravman's Avatar
Great start. This is going to be good. Looking forward to your strudder construction.
Latest blog entry: Myrtle Corey
Apr 19, 2013, 12:04 PM
GPR
GPR
Registered User
GPR's Avatar
Thread OP
Once all the frames were properly faired (I hope), they were removed from the keel, interiors were cut out and the frames were permanently glued in place. The chine stringers were then glued in place and sanded flush with the frames. Balsa blocks were glued in at the bow and stern and sanded fair with the other frames.
Last edited by GPR; Apr 19, 2013 at 12:49 PM.


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Discussion Central Banks and 'order', II MtnGoat Life, The Universe, and Politics 133 Apr 17, 2013 09:30 AM
Wanted Airtronics Olympic II manual jbogdano Aircraft - Sailplanes (FS/W) 4 Mar 27, 2013 05:07 PM
Discussion CHICO II - Vintage 36/600 RodACarr Sailboats 1 Mar 27, 2013 10:52 AM
Help! Airtronics Olympic II manual jbogdano Thermal 3 Mar 27, 2013 09:53 AM
New Product Now available: Cox Black Widow II - Golden Bee II - Venom II xenalook 1/2A Planes 0 Mar 22, 2012 02:09 PM