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Old Jan 28, 2013, 08:26 AM
Edubarca is offline
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Help!

Removing burnt castor oil from glow engine's head


Hello my fellow modellers, Anybody out there knows a product, that can remove the burnt castor oil (yellowish hard substance adhered to the engine's head) which cannot easily be removed with ordinary solvents like thinner, kerosene, gasoline etc.? I still use glow engines and stay away from electrics, for the time being at least, but that's another story. Thanks for your help!!

Eduardo
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Old Jan 28, 2013, 08:37 AM
1320fastback is offline
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Automotive Antifreeze simmering in a Crock Pot will do it.
Old Jan 28, 2013, 08:39 AM
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Thanks!! What on earth is a "Crock Pot"???
Old Jan 28, 2013, 08:42 AM
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Maybe you call them a slow cooker?
Old Jan 28, 2013, 09:41 AM
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I just started using Dawn Power Dissolver and it works very well in removing baked on oil. You spray it on, use a toothbrush to scub then rinse off with water. The water part is my only hesitation, so either run the engine or disassemble to dry thoroughly.

It's a little difficult to find but available at Walmart, Ace and online.

http://www.amazon.com/Procter-Gamble.../dp/B000I1A8QW


- Norm
Old Jan 28, 2013, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norm Furutani View Post
I just started using Dawn Power Dissolver and it works very well in removing baked on oil. You spray it on, use a toothbrush to scub then rinse off with water. The water part is my only hesitation, so either run the engine or disassemble to dry thoroughly.

It's a little difficult to find but available at Walmart, Ace and online.

http://www.amazon.com/Procter-Gamble.../dp/B000I1A8QW


- Norm
I'll back Norm up, Dawn Power Dissolver is all I use. Be careful on painted surfaces, for instance the painted heads on some McCoy's but other than that, it's great!!
Old Jan 28, 2013, 05:40 PM
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Thanks for suggestions. Unfortunately, this product is not available here in Colombia and is not easy to import. It will come out very expensive due to shipping costs. I will try local oven cleaners. Perhaps they will do the job.
Old Jan 29, 2013, 06:25 AM
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Most oven cleaners contain Sodium and/or Potassium Hydroxide.
These chemicals rapidly dissolve Aluminium. If you wish to destroy your engine go ahead with Oven Cleaners. Why ignore the valid suggestion to use hot automobile anti-freeze?. (Ethylene Glycol). Clarence Lee used to recommend this method!.
Old Jan 29, 2013, 08:24 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Moore View Post
Most oven cleaners contain Sodium and/or Potassium Hydroxide.
These chemicals rapidly dissolve Aluminium. If you wish to destroy your engine go ahead with Oven Cleaners. Why ignore the valid suggestion to use hot automobile anti-freeze?. (Ethylene Glycol). Clarence Lee used to recommend this method!.
Hi John, No, I'm not ignoring the antifreeze suggestion. It is simply that here in Colombia, we have no seasons so we never have the need for adding antifreeze liquids to our cars thus is not available. Being a total ignorant in chemistry, what other compounds uses Ethylene Glycol but are easily available everywhere in the world??
Old Jan 29, 2013, 09:19 AM
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Saw where the anti-freeze suggestion was going a few posts back. Strange how the road to hell is paved with good intentions, manage to miss the keyboard with the coffee splutter.

Regards Ian.
Old Jan 29, 2013, 10:04 AM
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Eduardo, The problem of removing baked castor from our engines has been around for decades. Dennis Allen asked me if I could find a solution to the problem in the early 60's!. The problem is that the products that would remove
Castor varnish easily also attack Aluminium and it's alloys. Hence my comments concerning oven cleaners.
Your question concerning products that contain Ethylene Glycol will not help.For the hot antifreeze procedure to work it has to be neat Ethyene Glycol.
I don't know whether any of your local airfields still have some in stock, but in the days of liquid cooled engines, glycol was the coolant. Perhaps you could ask!.
The other product that may help is gel type paint stripper. I believe the active ingredient in them is Methylene Chloride. Because this solvent has a high rate of evaporation, it is incorporated in a gel, a) to slow down the evaporation, and b) to allow the product to adhere to vertical surfaces to allow the paint to soften.
Try immersing your cylinder head in a screw top jar (metal lid!) containing the stripper, for a day or two, or as long as it takes to soften. Check that there is no reaction with the Aluminium. When soft, brush the residue away under hot water.
Good luck!

John
Old Jan 29, 2013, 05:45 PM
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Thank you very much John, you are very kind. I'll see what I can find and let you know.
Old Jan 30, 2013, 03:48 AM
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Hi Eduardo,

In my world, the most successful method so far, is the so called "crockpot" treatment.
I have no "crockpot" though....as the photo shows, I use an electric stove with a simple thermostat, plus a thermometer, which enables me to tune the thermostat to keep the temperature at optimal level, which is about 80-90C (175-195 F), in about 6-8 H.
The Ethyene Glycol should be concentrated, not diluted.

The temperature range mentioned above, provides good efficiency without giving off too much nasty fumes...
There will be some fumes present though, so good ventilation is recommended.

This method works great !
After "cooking", all castor oil has converted to a kind of "crumbs" easily removed with a tooth brush, in hot water.

This treatment does not affect aluminium and steel parts at all.

I use to omit brass parts, due to the build up of a greyish coat, that has to be polished away.
Also, anodized and painted parts shouldn't be "cooked" in this bath.





I'm aware that ultrason treatment is very clean and efficient, but the price tag of such equipment has so far had a deterrent effect on me...

.
Old Jan 30, 2013, 04:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gluehand View Post
Hi Eduardo,

In my world, the most successful method so far, is the so called "crockpot" treatment.
I have no "crockpot" though....as the photo shows, I use an electric stove with a simple thermostat, plus a thermometer, which enables me to tune the thermostat to keep the temperature at optimal level, which is about 80-90C (175-195 F), in about 6-8 H.
The Ethyene Glycol should be concentrated, not diluted.

The temperature range mentioned above, provides good efficiency without giving off too much nasty fumes...
There will be some fumes present though, so good ventilation is recommended.

This method works great !
After "cooking", all castor oil has converted to a kind of "crumbs" easily removed with a tooth brush, in hot water.

This treatment does not affect aluminium and steel parts at all.

I use to omit brass parts, due to the build up of a greyish coat, that has to be polished away.
Also, anodized and painted parts shouldn't be "cooked" in this bath.





I'm aware that ultrason treatment is very clean and efficient, but the price tag of such equipment has so far had a deterrent effect on me...

.
If you use this method, DO NOT use the pot for cooking food after brewing up the glycol. WE need all the modellers we have.

Greg
Old Jan 30, 2013, 05:52 AM
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Originally Posted by greggles47 View Post
If you use this method, DO NOT use the pot for cooking food after brewing up the glycol.
!

I can promise that..!
This pot is a flea market find, never ever getting close to the kitchen....



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