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Mar 25, 2016, 03:24 PM
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New Guy alert:
Please forgive me if I am post-jacking this thread. From what I can tell it looks like new questions are appended to an existing thread rather than starting a new thread. If this is not thecase please let me know and I will start a new thread. Otherwise here we go:

Thursday the 24th I went out the Thunderbird field to meet some of the guys (Thanks Rex, Ron and Ken!) and try my hand at flying for the first time under the guidance of someone with far more experience than myself. I had a great time, good enough for me to go right out and buy a radio + Phoenix RC simulator. I realize that the physics of the computer will never match the real world and I also understand through my extensive reading that I need to start off with an easy to repair low cost high wing trainer. For the life of me all the aircraft I have flown the ParkZone Corsair seems to be the easiest to control and most forgiving. I realize this is exactly opposite of what I thought, it being a low wing WWII style attack craft. Would this be a bad choice for my first plane? Are the physics of the SIM that far off?

Note: the transmitter I purchased is a Specktrum DX6i if that helps answer my question.

Thanks for your help.
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Mar 25, 2016, 06:27 PM
Registered User
First off, welcome to the hobby and to the Thunderbirds Keith. Planes on the simulator will generally fly more smoothly and will be easier to see than at the flying field. I wouldn't recommend the Parkzone Corsair for a first plane. It's a smooth flying scale plane and very popular for that, and would be a good choice for a second or third plane. But it doesn't have the self-righting characteristics that new pilots need.
If you don't want to fly the bigger glow planes, the Eflite Apprentice has a huge following as a beginner plane. It won't fly as smoothly, especially in the wind, as the bigger .40-.60 size glow trainers that most of us started with, but it's a good performer for what it is. A lot of the decision though rests in the kinds of planes you want to fly once you have some skills. If it will be smaller park flyers for the foreseeable future, the Apprentice is a good choice. But if you plan to fly the bigger planes like you normally see at Thunderbird field, you'll be better off buying a trainer that size.
Mar 25, 2016, 10:13 PM
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rowdyjoe's Avatar
Hello Keith,
Welcome to the Thunderbird's forum and to RC flying. A simulator is an excellent way to start and will make flying "the real thing" a lot more comfortable. The hardest thing most beginners have to learn is which way to move the "sticks" to get the airplane to do what you want. It can be very frustrating and expensive until it becomes second nature but, the simulator will save you the vast majority of both.
I recommend you show up for training on every Thursday and fly with our Instructors and their trainers until you solo. After that, I would recommend a high wing trainer called the Avistar sold by Tower Hobbies. It has a semi-symmetrical wing and will do most aerobatics. It's hard to beat for a first plane. (I don't work for Tower or get any kick-backs )
I agree with Jester. Leave the low wing airplanes alone,at least until you solo a high wing plane. He's also correct about choosing a "bigger/heavier" plane than the Corsair. The bigger, heavier planes are easier to handle in the winds we must contend with in this area. We rarely have winds less than 10mph and that's about the upper limit for a light weight plane unless your an experienced/intermediate pilot. An airplane doesn't care much what the wind is doing once it's airborne but, getting them up and down safely is another story ....especially when it's windy.
As you gain experience in the hobby, you'll find that the bigger planes fy better and more often because they can handle higher winds.

Good luck and come out and fly often. I'm looking forward to shaking your hand.

Garry
Forum Moderator

Quote:
Originally Posted by keith.m
New Guy alert:
Please forgive me if I am post-jacking this thread. From what I can tell it looks like new questions are appended to an existing thread rather than starting a new thread. If this is not thecase please let me know and I will start a new thread. Otherwise here we go:

Thursday the 24th I went out the Thunderbird field to meet some of the guys (Thanks Rex, Ron and Ken!) and try my hand at flying for the first time under the guidance of someone with far more experience than myself. I had a great time, good enough for me to go right out and buy a radio + Phoenix RC simulator. I realize that the physics of the computer will never match the real world and I also understand through my extensive reading that I need to start off with an easy to repair low cost high wing trainer. For the life of me all the aircraft I have flown the ParkZone Corsair seems to be the easiest to control and most forgiving. I realize this is exactly opposite of what I thought, it being a low wing WWII style attack craft. Would this be a bad choice for my first plane? Are the physics of the SIM that far off?

Note: the transmitter I purchased is a Specktrum DX6i if that helps answer my question.

Thanks for your help.
Mar 28, 2016, 08:32 PM
Registered User
51pilot's Avatar
Welcome aboard Keith,
You should be able to put in a wind variance into your settings on you flight sim. That should help you to learn to cope with the winds we get around here. Especially a cross wind where it is blowing across the runway instead of down the middle of it. I am from the panhandle and learned the hard way of doing it. HAHA. I fly giant scale warbirds like the Corsair, P-51 Mustang and the P-40 N Warhawk and a 30cc Sbach 342 and a few others small and big. Like the guys are telling you the bigger they are the easier they are to fly.
Good luck and if you need any help at all these guys in the Thunderbirds are a great bunch and are willing to help anyone out that needs it.
Frank
Apr 01, 2016, 08:49 PM
Registered User
rowdyjoe's Avatar

Four Stroke Engine Crankshaft & Exhaust Threads


Here's some very helpful information if you're looking for hard to find parts or just need to know.

http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/s...14X4531X31.pdf

RC Four Stroke Engine Crankshaft & Exhaust Threads
by Gregory Kamysz
http://www.dieselrc.com/

Garry
Apr 02, 2016, 11:25 PM
Registered User
Thank you for your help, everyone. Garry, it was nice meeting you this Thursday as usual I learned a lot.

I had already purchased a BNF Super Cub 4/5 channel plane that I have been practicing touch and goes with but I feel myself leaning towards the larger aircraft.

As for training, I have worked with Rex two Thursdays so far and am getting more comfortable controlling the plane in the air. I still spend plenty of time on the SIM with high winds speeds, but l have a long way to go especially with orientation.

I work evenings except every other Thursday which makes Thursday training days hard to attend. This last Thursday was an exception. Are people at the field on the weekends? If so I would like to go watch and learn as much as possible.
Apr 04, 2016, 06:26 AM
Registered User
There are just about always people there on the weekends. If you have your own buddy box, ask for help when you're there.
Apr 04, 2016, 11:08 PM
Registered User
rowdyjoe's Avatar
You're very welcome Keith. I enjoyed meeting and visiting with you. Looks like we have a lot in common.
The weekends are always busy when the weather is good ....and to us, that means no thunderstorms, winds less than 25 mph, and blowing nearly straight down the runway. Personally, I don't like to fly when the winds are strong enough to form white caps on the lake but, that's just me.

We have the friendliest club members you'll find anywhere. Just ask and someone will be willing to help you.

If you're looking for something bigger and heavier to fly, take a look at this planes from Tower Hobbies http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXBMM9&P=0. It is relatively inexpensive to build and fly and it comes in 3 sizes based on engine size. The smallest is the .40/.46, the .60/.65 (http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXBMM8&P=0), and the "giant" version .120/.160 (http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...?&I=LXKJY0&P=0) or you can put a 20cc gas engine on it. They are aerobatic but, handle much like a trainer. I'm currently building the smallest one and have an OS .46 two stroke mounted on it. They are great for stepping up to the next level above a trainer but, I know folks who have successfully used them for training.

Garry
Last edited by rowdyjoe; Apr 04, 2016 at 11:21 PM.
Apr 07, 2016, 10:31 PM
Registered User
Thanks Garry, after finally seeing a Big Stik fly in person today it peaked my interest. I really want my next plane to be larger and possibly glow/gas powered, but still a trainer style like the Big Stik.
Apr 07, 2016, 11:10 PM
Registered User
rowdyjoe's Avatar
Hey Keith. Nice seeing you again today and glad you got to do some flying.

The stick series are great flyers and have enough dihedral to be somewhat forgiving, similar to a trainer but, not quite. It's a good step up from a trainer and will help build your confidence and, when you're ready, they make a great entry level "pattern" plane. It's hard to wrong with a stick.

BTW ...take a look at Tower Hobbies "Super Saver's Club". It's costs around about $5 a year but, the discounts and free shipping are well worth it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by keith.m
Thanks Garry, after finally seeing a Big Stik fly in person today it peaked my interest. I really want my next plane to be larger and possibly glow/gas powered, but still a trainer style like the Big Stik.
Apr 10, 2016, 02:52 PM
Registered User
rowdyjoe's Avatar

Spaceship and Commercial Flight in Formation


Virgin Galactic White Knight 2 and Spaceship 2 in formation flight with a commercial flight approaching San Francisco airport.

Enjoy ...

http://www.chonday.com/Videos/jegalctospc2
Apr 10, 2016, 10:10 PM
Registered User

Cherokee ARF Exhaust options


I recently purchased the Great Planes Cherokee ARF and decided to go with a Magnum .52 4 cycle glow engine. I am looking for some elegant exhaust options to reduce cowl cutting but haven't had much luck looking on the web. I plan on mounting the engine at 90 degrees, head on the starboard side and will require a cowl cut for glow/cooling access. This puts the exhaust straight down and if it was a 2 cycle I would just bolt on a pits muffler, but I haven't found anything similar for the 4 cycle. I may just be stuck with the muffler hanging out below the fuselage. Any ideas?

With a 2 stroke muffler cut out.



The engine I purchased.

Apr 11, 2016, 11:27 AM
Registered User
Why not mount it inverted and angle the muffler back a bit? That would make the whole engine nearly invisible.
On the Magnum- don't expect the same power you'd get from a similar OS or Saito engine. I had one on a .40 size Cub and it would barely fly it at all. If this plane flies well on a bushing .40, you'll probably be fine. But if it's designed for a normal .46 AX or similar, you'll be seriously underpowered.
Apr 11, 2016, 09:47 PM
Registered User
rowdyjoe's Avatar
Keith,
Try JtecRC http://www.jtecrc.com/incowlmufflers40-59.htm

They carry mufflers/exhaust systems for just about everything.

I also think the .52 magnum will not be enough engine for this plane. If you like Magnum engines, try the .70 4 stroke for a few bucks more. http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXXRH3&P=ML

Garry
Apr 11, 2016, 10:06 PM
Registered User
Thanks for the help, guys. Looks like I might be purchasing a different engine.


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