How to Select Your First Radio - Page 4 - RC Groups
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Aug 16, 2014, 12:57 PM
Registered User

Radio and Sim Software


I am lookng at gettting the Phoneix Sim software, not sure if I should by the one with the DX6i or just with the interface and get a DX6. any suggestions?

I have also considered gettting the DX9 , but not sure if I want to spend the extra since I am just getting into RC Aircraft. Will be flying electric only.
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Aug 16, 2014, 09:40 PM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
I would get the DX6.
Sep 02, 2014, 07:49 AM
Pittsburgh, Pa.
I am brand new to the hobby and today I am going to order a DX6 along with a Phoenix sim. Once I get a handle on what I doing I am going to order a Apprentice. I did much research along with fantastic advice that I have reveived from this forum. The original post brought up some very good points(channels, trainer port, types of aircraft, budget). For me the DX6 fits my needs for now as it has enough channels, a good buddy box (also wireless) for my grandkids, and a great price for a beginner. Another feature that I like is that the screen is backlit. I looked at a lot of radios at the local club and many were very hard to read in certain lights. My two cents!
Sep 02, 2014, 08:06 AM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
Best of luck with your new radio, your new hobby and enjoying it with your grandkids.
Sep 08, 2014, 02:45 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by G. I. Flyer
I am brand new to the hobby and today I am going to order a DX6 along with a Phoenix sim. Once I get a handle on what I doing I am going to order a Apprentice. I did much research along with fantastic advice that I have reveived from this forum. The original post brought up some very good points(channels, trainer port, types of aircraft, budget). For me the DX6 fits my needs for now as it has enough channels, a good buddy box (also wireless) for my grandkids, and a great price for a beginner. Another feature that I like is that the screen is backlit. I looked at a lot of radios at the local club and many were very hard to read in certain lights. My two cents!

I have the DX6i but because I have outgrown it I will get the new DX6 but on the backlit display nice as it might be I have to say when I'm flying I don't look at the screen but the new voice options will be nice.
Sep 23, 2014, 10:28 PM
Registered User
woow,you all excellent.Thanks for sharing with we all
Sep 24, 2014, 10:18 AM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradley Crandall
I have the DX6i but because I have outgrown it I will get the new DX6 but on the backlit display nice as it might be I have to say when I'm flying I don't look at the screen but the new voice options will be nice.
Backlit displays are more for making adjustments to the radio when the plane is on the ground, OR, if you have telemetry that displays on the screen such as battery voltage or altitude and such.
Sep 24, 2014, 11:15 AM
Micro and Beyond!
I purchased the DX6i and am very happy with it. However, if I could use a "way-back" machine, I would have gone with the DX6. Three position switches would be great and that ten model memory just ain't gonna cut it for long. Four months into the hobby and I only have three empty models left...
Oct 07, 2014, 12:53 PM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
Blukesky

What you are experiencing is the issue of enjoying the hobby more than you expected. Your first radio purchase covered what you THOUGHT you would need and you are already outgrowing it. You must be having way too much fun.

The beauty is that if you stay in the Spektrum line, or at least with a DSMX radio, you can grow with your next radio and continue to use your current radio. And they can be back-up to each other.
Oct 27, 2014, 05:34 AM
SAFE at any speed
RayDF's Avatar

"Users Guide" for Spektrum radios?


I have a Spektrum DX6 (2014 version) and although I know how to use the most basic and elemental controls, and also after having read the manual many times top to bottom, I still have great doubts about the more advanced stuff, such as sub-trims, channel mixes, and so on. For example, I merely managed to correctly program the Throttle Cut function yesterday, after long hours of fiddling with it!

I wonder if there is a sort of "User's Guide"-style of document or manual that I could buy or download where each of these more-complex transmitter functions are explained in newbie-oriented terminology? I suspect that I'm missing out on a lot of good stuff due to my ignorance.

I'm not interested in how to program it in the DX6, since that's well covered in the manual but instead, I want to know about the why and when (in which cases) each of those advanced functions are needed and/or desired to program for an airplane.

Thanks!

Ray
Miami FL
Last edited by RayDF; Oct 27, 2014 at 07:35 AM.
Oct 27, 2014, 10:17 AM
http://www.sgvhumane.org/
cmdl's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayDF
I have a Spektrum DX6 (2014 version) and although I know how to use the most basic and elemental controls, and also after having read the manual many times top to bottom, I still have great doubts about the more advanced stuff, such as sub-trims, channel mixes, and so on. For example, I merely managed to correctly program the Throttle Cut function yesterday, after long hours of fiddling with it!

I wonder if there is a sort of "User's Guide"-style of document or manual that I could buy or download where each of these more-complex transmitter functions are explained in newbie-oriented terminology? I suspect that I'm missing out on a lot of good stuff due to my ignorance.

I'm not interested in how to program it in the DX6, since that's well covered in the manual but instead, I want to know about the why and when (in which cases) each of those advanced functions are needed and/or desired to program for an airplane.

Thanks!

Ray
Miami FL
ask here: https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show....php?t=2089776
Nov 07, 2014, 02:05 PM
Registered User
Adamskido76's Avatar
Hi guys great thread. I am also a noob struggling to decide what to buy. I am getting the dx4 with my Delta Ray and want to use that on my Sport cub s also but will i need the new dx6 to get better flights from my planes or are they only essential if you want to progress to better and bigger planes?
Nov 07, 2014, 02:56 PM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
You can fly most planes on a 4 channel radio. As is outlined in the article in the first post, it is extra features that can make your life easier or allow you to do things automatically that would have to be done manually. More channels will allow you to control more things, like flaps and landing gear, lights, smoke, and so on.

With one standard radio like the DX4 you can fly 5 planes, but you will have to be very diligent in set-up of the planes so they all fly with the same trims. Or you have to keep good records so you know how to reset servo direction, trims, etc. and manually reset the radio every time you change planes.

If you have a computer radio, with model memories, it saves the settings for each plane and adjusts them automatically and saves them after the flight.

It goes on and on. Again, take a look at the article in the first post but the more advance radios do have some nice features with model memories being the most important if you have multiple planes.
Last edited by aeajr; Nov 08, 2014 at 08:44 AM.
Nov 08, 2014, 03:42 AM
Registered User
Adamskido76's Avatar
Thanks aeajr really appreciate your time i didnt think about having to set the trims each time for diff planes and i thought this was going to be a piece of cake! hmmm what to do what to do???Im now thinking along the lines of buying my DR and Sport Cub S BNF and getting a DX6 but will it be a bit much for a noob to take on trying to programme the thing so it has the same setup as the DX4 i.e panic button and the 3 modes? I "found" this hobby that i didnt even know i was looking for but i got the bug now and it starting to bite hard!! Thanks again pal really appreciate it
Nov 08, 2014, 08:43 AM
Proud member of LISF and ESL
If you read the article in the first post you know that I am very much in favor of starting on RTFs that come with a radio. This allows you to focus on learning to fly rather than learning to program a radio. I suggest you read the article.

If you are totally new, never flown, and if you are going to learn without using a buddy box, I usually recommend an RTF, ready to fly package that includes the airplane, radio, all the electronics already installed in the plane. It usually includes the battery and charger too. This eliminates so many decisions and considerations and points of confusion. This lets the pilot focus on learning to fly. Which RTF? That is a question for another discussion but there are lots of good ones out there. They all come with a radio that should be adequate to the task of flying that plane. And the value of the radio, in that package, is typically so small that even if you never use it for anything else, that’s OK.


If you get the Delta Ray with the DX4 it will cost you an extra $30. Now you have a radio that is super simple and well matched to the plane. Hard to make a mistake with the radio. And the instructions will include the set-up of the radio.

If you get the Delta Ray and the DX6 now you have two things to learn. And if you have a problem with the Delta Ray, well, was it the plane or your set-up of the radio?

For the Extra $30 I would get the RTF and focus on your flying.

Wait for the second plane until you have the first one well managed. I would stick with one plane for several months, perhaps even a season. Learn all you can on that plane. Push it to its limits before you go to the next one.

When there is absolutely no concern about crashing because you are unsure of your skills, and when you can make the delta ray do all you want, then you can consider another plane and another radio. At that time you may feel you want a different plane as your second.

You may decide at that time that maybe the DX6 is not the right radio for you. Perhaps you want something else. Maybe you want more channels. Why rush to the DX6 and a second plane right away?

Eventually you will get your second plane and your more advanced radio. Now you have two planes and two radios. Hey, you can teach a friend to fly and you can fly together. You can hook them up as a buddy box arrangement. And, if anything happens to one radio you have the other and can still fly.

That would be my recommended path. But your smileage will vary.
Last edited by aeajr; Nov 08, 2014 at 08:53 AM.


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