Coast Guard 36' Motor Lifeboat from Dumas - Page 3 - RC Groups
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Jan 02, 2013, 03:54 PM
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I think that a lot of modelers out there have found a better product for glazing (filling) than the use of the RED SPOT FILLER, which is really a thick lacquer based primer, and that is the use of EVERCOAT POLYESTER GLAZING PUTTY. This is a two part mix which really sets up quickly and sands very easily.

It is unaffected by lacquer thinner or mineral sprits, and takes primer very nicely. It also can be used over dried and sanded primers with very good bonding to the primer coats.
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Jan 02, 2013, 05:04 PM
r/c ships and workboats
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankg
I think that a lot of modelers out there have found a better product for glazing (filling) than the use of the RED SPOT FILLER, which is really a thick lacquer based primer, and that is the use of EVERCOAT POLYESTER GLAZING PUTTY. This is a two part mix which really sets up quickly and sands very easily.

It is unaffected by lacquer thinner or mineral sprits, and takes primer very nicely. It also can be used over dried and sanded primers with very good bonding to the primer coats.
Not only is is great for the above mentioned reasons, it is also of a finner grit and sands out extremely smooth and nice!
Jan 07, 2013, 12:02 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar

Installing the Bumpers and Rub Rails


The bumpers and rub rails were glued in place using Cya. Unforunately it's cold enough in the shop that the glue sets very slowly, so the outer rails -- olastic-to-plastic -- had to be taped in place to cure. The plastic-to-fiberglass joints were no pronblem, those kicked off just like one might expect.
Jan 07, 2013, 12:06 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar

Fitting the Bilge Keel


The bilge keels are shaped from ABS plastic stock. The profile was cut first using the band saw. The cross section was shaped next using the disc sander to rough shape, then finished sanded with a sanding block. The bevel was cut with a sharp wood chisel. When all the shaping was done the finished parts were glued in place.
Jan 07, 2013, 12:22 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar

Setting Up the Rudder and Keel Extention


Setting up the rudder bearing tube is pretty straight foreward. However, the rudder tube should be 2 1/4" long, but in my kit the tube supplied was only 1 1/2" so I had to make a new one from 5/32" brass tubing. No big deal, and Dumas has already been notified, so if it is a problem rather then mine just being an odd-ball they'll get it fixed.
Jan 07, 2013, 12:24 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar

Priming the Big Pieces


With most of the major work done, and the weather sorta'-kinda' cooperating I ran outside and shot a heavy coat of primer on the hull, turtledeck and hatch cover.
Jan 07, 2013, 12:27 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar

Fixing the boo-Boo's


As always, when the primer goes on, the last of the flaws really stand out. Red spot glaze putty was used to fix the minor stuf, and to fill the gaps in the bumpers and rub rails I'll use a catalized glazing putty since that stuff is actually structural. More on that later once its done.
Jan 07, 2013, 12:30 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar

Getting Down to the Details


The front and rear bulkheads are set up with a styrene plastic edge combing. The plastic is fairly stiff, so needed to be pre-shaped before it was glued in place. Then once in place, the edge was filled with spot putty and sanded.
Last edited by P. Tritle; Jan 07, 2013 at 12:35 PM.
Jan 07, 2013, 12:35 PM
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Building Up the Detail Part Sub-Assemblies


At this point we're basically down to the small parts. Each of the sub-assemblies were built up per the instructions, then glued in place, providing having them in place would not make painting a chore. Those parts are set aside until after painting and then will be glued in place.
Jan 07, 2013, 12:39 PM
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P. Tritle's Avatar

Building the Windshield Frame


The windshield frame is made from mahogany strip, assembled over a full size drawing. When dry it was sealed with a coat of clear lacher, though before its all done several more coats will be applied.

At this point there are a couple more sub-assemblies that need a bit of attention, then the final prime coate can be applied to fix the last of the flaws, then it'll be on to color coats. Stay tuned, lots more to come.

PAT
Jan 08, 2013, 09:44 AM
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P. Tritle's Avatar

Modifying the Removable Turtle Deck


In the instructions for detailing Bulkhead #4 it mentions that there will be an interferance with the protruding details on the bulkhead if the floor/ turtledeck assembly is to be removable for R/C opperation. One alternative was to leave some of the details off, which to me wasn't a real good option, so insted I cut the floor board in two sections, then skinned the forward section with .020 sheet styrene. Now, the details can be added and, the floor unit is still removable, AND, from the outside no one will ever know the difference.
Jan 08, 2013, 09:47 AM
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Adding the Detail Parts, Final Prime, and Painting


After cleaning up the last of the rough spots and adding several of the detail sub-assemblies the last coat of primer went on, followed by the white base coat. Next up will be to mask the water line and get the bottom painted.

Still lots of work to do, but the light at the end of the tunnel is getting brighter now. Stay tuned, lots more on the way....

PAT
Jan 08, 2013, 09:56 AM
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P. Tritle's Avatar
As a side note: I was in the local Auto Zone the other day to pick up a tube of red spot glazing putty, and somehow grabbed the wrong tube. It turns out that what I bought was a tube of Bondo brand catalized spot putty. Well, I figured that as long as I was now the proud owner I might as well give it a try and see how it did. Turns out it's terrific stuff to work with, dries -- or should I say, cures quickly, and sands beautifully. The stuff is a good bit thinner then standard full strength Bondo, so there is a bit of shrinkage, but nothing to get excited about.

This is the first time I've seen catalized spot putty at the auto parts store, which would account for grabbing the wrong stuff. Now that I've used it I'll no doubt stay with it for fixing the small flaws and things like filling the seams around the bumpers and such, but for the overall skin coat on the fiberglass lay ups I'll probably stay with the air drying type since the working time is so much better.

PAT
Jan 08, 2013, 10:08 AM
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Tim B.'s Avatar
LOOKS GREAT !

Curious to see how you will arrange electronics ~

Jan 11, 2013, 12:15 PM
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Setting Up the Running Gear


Hooking up the rudder set up is as simple as mounting the servo and hooking up the rudder control horn. It's a very compact set up with the only hitch being that when the rudder goes to full deflection, the front end of the push rod doesn't hit the bulkhead.

The motor mount is set up per the instructions, though the doublers weren't added to the beams. A new mount plate was made from 1/8" lite ply for the 920 KV Suppo 2212 Brushless Outrunner motor and dry fitted onto the beams. A short section of brass tube is slipped into the couplers to hold the motor in alignment to make locating the motor on its new mount a whole bunch easier.

Once the mount was sized and fitted to the beams, the brass coupling tobe was removed, the dogbone installed and the mount was glued in place.


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