Thread Tools
Jan 01, 2013, 10:13 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Mini-Review

Coast Guard 36' Motor Lifeboat from Dumas


Well, what better way to start the New Year then with a brand new build? Actually, the build began on Christmas Eve, so figured New Years would be a great time to get the Build Thread rolling.

The kit is one of the newest releases from Dumas, and comes in a large colorful box complete with several photos of the finished model that come in real handy for reference along the way.. The kit contains everything needed to finish the model with the exception of the running gear.

The instructions are well done, laid out in the typical step-by-step fashion. In all there are 371 building steps and a couple of paragraphs on setting up the running gear, along with 59 detail drawings to be used in conjunction with the building instructions provided in a seperate booklet. Also included are the full size general arrangement drawings along with a full size keel plan.

The ply parts are laser cut, with generous quantities of strip wood supplied for planking the hull. A nice package of metal parts is also provided for the detail parts. In all, the kit is very complete, nicely laid out, and looks like it'll be a great build -- so, let's get started....
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Jan 01, 2013, 10:18 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Starting Out Simple


Construction begins with the Boat Stand. The stand is made up from laser cut lite ply parts and strip wood cut to length. For the beginner new to boat modeling, building the stand per the instructions will be a terrific introduction to how the instructions are laid out, and how they coincide with the detail drawings.
Jan 01, 2013, 10:24 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Building the Keel


The keel assembly is built up from laser cut ply parts and bass wood strip stock. It's built directly over the full size drawings, and requires the prop bearing tube to be glued in as an integral part of the keel assembly. The baring tube is 3/16" O. D. and the keel is laminated from 2 layers of 1/8" lite ply, so a 1/32" balsa shim was used to center the tube in the keel. Tom recommends using small bits of cerial box cardboard for the shims, but anything that around .030" thick will do the trick.
Jan 01, 2013, 10:40 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Framing the Hull


The hull is built on the "half shell" with the formers going in on either side of the keel. The first side was blued in place using Cya and kicker. A squaring block was used to keep the frame halves perpendicular to the keel when gluing them in place.
Jan 01, 2013, 10:53 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Adding the Other Side....


The keel was lifted from the building board and the other side formers were glued in place. Bass wood sticks were clamped across the formers to keep things aligned while the glue dried.
Jan 01, 2013, 11:00 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Fitting the Deck Sheers


The deck sheers were built up over the full size drawings, and when dry were fitted into the frames. Take your time here, there's quit a curve involved, so work slowly and coaxe in the bends rather then try to force them. Once the sheers are fitted and aligned, they were glued in, starting in the middle and working toward both ends.
Jan 01, 2013, 11:05 AM
Registered User
Tim B.'s Avatar

Great !


This will be Great !

I have been waiting for someone else to build this one and I am sure your will be Top Notch !
Jan 01, 2013, 11:06 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Planking the Hull


Let the Fun Begin.....

Planking the hull is not difficult, but there are 44 planks involved, so plan on spending some time fitting, aligning, and gluing them in place. All the the planks are laid using 1/8 X 1/4 balsa. Tom suggests using a plank bender at the front and back, but the wood in my kit was really soft, so there was no problem making the curves. I also wetted the stick on the outside only, so as the water soaked in the planks took on a natural curve. After the first 4 or 5 I had a pretty good feel for how they would align and things really began to go smoothly.
Jan 01, 2013, 11:14 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Contunuing on Toward the Bottom....


The first nine planks on each side went in untrimmed, so it was simply a matter of gluing them in place. Cys glue was used, applied to the edge of the previously laid plank, and worked in starting at one end and working toward the other.

As things progressed, many of the planks required trimming, tapering and fitting, but were not difficult to work in, it just took a little time. The last plank was basically a filler, and once fitted into the space was glued in place from the inside using thin cya.

Looking back, using the sequence called out in the instructions, the process was really pretty easy, but it did take a little time to keep things aligned along the way. I also alternated side-to-side with each plank throughout the entire proces to insure the hull came out nice and straight.
Jan 01, 2013, 11:20 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Sealing the Hull on tne Inside


Before the top side planking goes on the hull needed to be sealed on the inside. Not only does this render the hull waterproof, but it also goes a long way in hardening the wood to make the hull much more durable -- especially considering the soft wood used.

A batch of West Systems resing was mixed up and thinned with denatured alcohol. Since the wood was a good bit softer then what I would normally use, the resin was thinned a bit more then normal so that it would soak deep into the wood to firm it up. A heavy coat was brushed into the hull on both the frames and the planks, then set aside to cure overnight.
Jan 01, 2013, 11:27 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Planking the Top Side


The cut-off's from the hull planks were used to plank the upper decks. The front deck used un-tapered strips in the middle, then as things progressed around the sides, each plank needed tapering to make the curves. And since the planking covered up the nav light housings, their location was marked along the way so that they would be easy to locate and open up once the planking was done. Again, the sequence was done as suggested in the instructions and progressed without a hitch.
Jan 01, 2013, 11:35 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Planking the Rear Deck


The rear deck required all of the planks to be tapered. Agian, not difficult, just a bit time consuming, but compared to the foredeck, nothing to it....
Jan 01, 2013, 11:37 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Finishing Up the Planking


And with that, the major planking was done. However, I also noticed as I read through the instructions that the Turtle Deck would be planked also, so I skipped ahead from step 84 up to step 147 and built the deck assembly so that when the fiberglass was applied to the hull I could do the Turtle Deck at the same time.

Here's where I deviated from the kit (the first time -- more on that in a minute). Since there are no compound curves on the turtle deck I opted to sheet it rather then strip plank. Make it a lot easier to finish that way. And since the curves around the frames were a fairly tight radius, I opted for two layers of 1/16 balsa sheet. I also added a couple of additional stringers at the middle of the curve to prevent the sheeting from sagging into the curve around the center of the radius. The sheeting went on just fine, and when done, the edges were sanded fluch with the formers.
Jan 01, 2013, 11:48 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Adding the Bow and Stern Fill blocks


The bow and stern is filled with blocks and carved to shape. A large -- and in this case, a very hard balsa block was provided. This is where the second deviation came in. Rather then cut and carve the balsa block I went with blue foam. The hull would be glassed anyway, so strength would not be an issue, and I can guarantee that the foam will be easier to carve and shape then the hard balsa would have been.

The blocks were cut to shape on the band saw, then glued in place with Elmer's Carpenters glue, allowed to dry overnight, then carved and sanded to shape. A razor saw was used to make the basic cuts, then a sanding block was used for final shaping.
Jan 01, 2013, 11:51 AM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar

Filling the Gaps and Leveling the Planks


To start the leveling process the entire hull was block sanded to knock down the high spots. Then a coat of Drywall Mud was mixed up and squeegeed onto the entire hull, and also used to fill the center seam on the turtle deck.


Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Build Log Building the Dumas U.S. Coast Guard 44' Lifeboat P. Tritle Scale Boats 72 Jun 13, 2016 03:15 PM
Discussion Dumas Coast Guard Lifeboat kit 33" clemkathy Scale Boats 5 Oct 05, 2008 05:26 PM
Help! Dumas Coast Guard 44' lifeboat Wolfmann Scale Boats 0 Aug 28, 2008 01:03 PM
Question Dumas U.S. Coast Guard 44' Lifeboat #1212 dash8man Scale Boats 10 Jul 25, 2005 02:51 PM