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Dec 29, 2012, 03:39 AM
Registered User
Possibly because the Wright Brothers held a patent on flight control surfaces that was so broad it covered anything from wing twist to ailerons, even though ailerons had already appeared earlier in European designs. It took a world war for that patent to be forcefully lapsed "for the good of humanity", i.e. , to allow other people to build better weapons.
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Dec 29, 2012, 07:14 AM
Electric Coolhunter
Thomas B's Avatar
Nope, don't think so. He was using classic ailerons which was one of the big disputes concerning the Wrights. I think this inventor simply thought he had invented something better as a pitch control.
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Dec 29, 2012, 09:33 AM
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richard hanson's Avatar
When I did the drag control thing - - (which I abandoned ) it was obvious that how the drag is arranged on a aircraft can change trim very easily.
The model would loop nicely , simply deploying the split rudders .
This is the kind of stuff one can try on a model -and see what REALLY happens
Dec 29, 2012, 11:48 AM
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kcaldwel's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas B View Post
Found it!....did some random searching on old odd aircraft newsreels and it turned up....: I knew I had seen it in a newsreel.
Thanks Thomas!

I have that news reel on VHS tape somewhere, so that is definitely where I saw it too. Nice to see it fly.

It is a creative way to reduce the performance of an airplane, for no particular gain.

Kevin
Dec 29, 2012, 12:09 PM
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ShoeDLG's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by kcaldwel View Post
It is a creative way to reduce the performance of an airplane, for no particular gain.
Unfortunately, I don't think that kind of creativity will ever go out of style...
Dec 29, 2012, 01:16 PM
Electric Coolhunter
Thomas B's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShoeDLG View Post
Unfortunately, I don't think that kind of creativity will ever go out of style...
Those pictures do not support your point, as the creativity shown in them WAS done for particular gains, unlike the odd experimental wing under discussion....
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Dec 29, 2012, 01:17 PM
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richard hanson's Avatar
It's more fun to do it than just comment on it !
Dec 29, 2012, 01:20 PM
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kcaldwel's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas B View Post
Those pictures do not support your point, as the creativity shown in them WAS done for particular gains, unlike the odd experimental wing under discussion....
It is an odd world where destroying people and infrastructure is routinely thought of as a gain...

Kevin
Dec 29, 2012, 01:30 PM
Ascended Master
Sparky Paul's Avatar
A better image of using control surfaces unconventionally...
Last edited by Sparky Paul; Dec 29, 2012 at 01:52 PM.
Dec 29, 2012, 01:49 PM
Registered User
ShoeDLG's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas B View Post
Those pictures do not support your point, as the creativity shown in them WAS done for particular gains, unlike the odd experimental wing under discussion....
I tried to find some pictures that highlighted the canted pylons on the Super Hornet, which fall squarely in the category of a "creative way to reduce the performance of an airplane, for no particular gain." They may have been canted for a reason, but not for particular gain.
Dec 29, 2012, 02:03 PM
dare to be dull
bigjohn's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShoeDLG View Post
I tried to find some pictures that highlighted the canted pylons on the Super Hornet, which fall squarely in the category of a "creative way to reduce the performance of an airplane, for no particular gain." They may have been canted for a reason, but not for particular gain.
I think you know less about aerodynamics than you think you do.
Dec 29, 2012, 02:15 PM
Registered User
richard hanson's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sparky Paul View Post
A better image of using control surfaces unconventionally...
cant both in and fer shere - you get an up pitch.
given the size n position - probably quite effective
Dec 29, 2012, 02:20 PM
Registered User
The F22 introduced the use of rudders as airbrakes. Yes, they do change the pitch trim as well, but that can be compensated with the elevons. It has the advantage of reducing the increase in radar signature that would be caused by using the airbrake. That's also the reason why the B2 uses split elevons as rudders. Adding a vertical surface would be easy, but it would increase the radar cross section massively.
Dec 29, 2012, 03:03 PM
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ShoeDLG's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigjohn View Post
I think you know less about aerodynamics than you think you do.
And you base that comment on?
Old Dec 29, 2012, 04:01 PM
richard hanson
A moderator felt this post violated the following rule: Offensive content (Profanity). It is temporarily hidden while richard hanson edits it.


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