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Oct 17, 2012, 08:48 PM
Bellanca Kruesair
epoxyearl's Avatar
Thread OP
Data

Choices of glue


We need to discuss adhesives,I guess..
We'll start with white or yellowish wood glue.It's called by many names,but the premise is the same.....hold pieces of wood together.
Some wood glues dry quickly,while others take their good old time.WE like slow drying glues where you need to align parts,which takes a little time.

In that case you may need to clamp or pin the pieces together until the glue "cures" or "sets" (dries).

Some wood glues can be sanded easily,others stay 'rubbery' and don't like to be smoothed out. The containers usually say whether it can be sanded easily.

the 'hard to sand' glues are the least bit flexible,and allow structures to flex without breaking.....The sandable glues are a little firmer,and insist parts stay still....
If you need to glue two edges together,the harder glue is preferable,as it's easier to sand smooth at the joints.

There are MANY glues available ....this is just one type of adhesive....
Last edited by epoxyearl; Oct 17, 2012 at 08:55 PM.
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Oct 17, 2012, 09:09 PM
Registered User
bullseye000's Avatar
Not sure what you're asking but for me it's Titebond for about 90% of a build. Some applications require the quick bond of CA and an occasional use of epoxy. I don't do well with the fumes CA generates when it kicks off. I usually have a fan blowing across my work bench or limit the amount I use.
Oct 17, 2012, 09:41 PM
AMA 937634
Stone1295's Avatar
I'm about 50/50 with Titebond and CA.

I really appreciate the instant gratification of CA but I prefer using Titebond. For me it's all about what surfaces I'm gluing. If I'm using thin ply then I go for Titebond every time for example.

I'm with bullseye on the fumes though. I try always use with a little air blowing to blow away the fumes.

-Mike
Oct 17, 2012, 09:46 PM
Registered User
bullseye000's Avatar
I did good with CA for years with no problems. On time I spent the afternoon building a wing with thin and medium CA and I woke up at about 2am feeling like some one was sitting on my chest. Doc said I developed an allergy and should avoid the stuff.

I recently did a build with Gorilla's wood glue. I was looking for something that dried a little more clear than Titebond. The stuff worked ok... really seemed to penetrate well and got tacky pretty quick. I'll go back to Titebond for my next build.
Oct 17, 2012, 09:58 PM
Play that funky music right
kenh3497's Avatar
I've used mostly Titebond and of course CA. Epoxy when I laminate doublers. Titebond would probely work just as well.

I just discovered Gorilla glue (polyurethane) for sheeting foam wings. I done two wing sets now. On my CAP 232 rebuild the foam sheeted wing half came out 16 grams lighter than the open bay built up wing of the original. The original was stripped of covering for comparison. I'll never use epoxy again for sheeting.

Ken
Oct 17, 2012, 11:38 PM
Übung macht den Meister..
Deuce's Avatar
My favorite adhesive for balsa is Ambroid (history here, one source here). As it is cellulose-based, it sands as well as the wood joined. Mixed with balsa dust from sanding, it makes an excellent filler, though the working time is a bit short!

I also use the wood glues, like Titebond, and epoxy where necessary. I tend to use CA glues sparingly (!), but some jobs are well-suited to its use.

James
Oct 18, 2012, 05:10 AM
Bellanca Kruesair
epoxyearl's Avatar
Thread OP
Has anybody tried laminating with Titebond/white glue? Most of us know that if we coat a sheet of liteply or balsa with anything wet,it usually curls or warps.

I cure the problem by clamping straight,flat on the workbench,and weighting it down until it dries/cures.

Somebody suggested just letting it dry first,then 'ironing' it together will activate the glue and 'weld' the parts.

What do you think?
Latest blog entry: Ban Birds.
Oct 18, 2012, 09:14 AM
Registered User
I'm working my first balsa build. I used the various CA's the kit instructions recommended to begin with but like bullseye and Stone, the fumes affected me pretty badly even with good ventilation. By the time I figured out that it was the glue and not the flu I was almost done assembling the frame.

For those using Titebond or other wood glues, how would you approach the tight-fitting laser cut kits? Dry fit, then remove the piece to coat the edge in the glue before re-fitting it into position?
Oct 18, 2012, 10:01 AM
AMA 937634
Stone1295's Avatar
Exactly that dmcMaine. Dry fit, pull apart, spread glue on mating surfaces, and clamp if possible or necessary.

I think probably the biggest mistake that I've made using CA is that I'm using too much and that's producing an excess of fumes. I bought glue tips for my CA like these:

http://www3.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin...&I=LXK295&P=ML

(but not exactly those so I cannot comment on this brand) and now I find that I'm using much less glue and the fumes are minimal. I still prefer Titebond though.

-Mike
Last edited by Stone1295; Oct 18, 2012 at 04:25 PM. Reason: spelling
Oct 18, 2012, 04:18 PM
Bellanca Kruesair
epoxyearl's Avatar
Thread OP
Epoxy is the "heavy-weight" of glues....Pun intended....probably the heaviest of any adhesive,absent melted lead...
But it's dependable ! Parts epoxied together usually stay together.
If you're careful to use small amounts of any other glue,every where else,you can use epoxy for landing gear mounts,firewalls ,and wing mounting points,without being OVERLY concerned about the added weight.

Fast,medium,and slow curing epoxies are available,at 5,15,and 30 min curing times. The quick stuff helps keep your fingers from cramping,if you hold the part till it cures...lol
The slower types penetrate hard woods a little deeper,ensuring a better bond.

Thinning epoxies with denatured alcohol enables you to paint fuel tank areas,and engine compartments to prevent fuel soak first,and add strength, as a secondary benefit.
Latest blog entry: Ban Birds.
Oct 18, 2012, 05:28 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by epoxyearl
Has anybody tried laminating with Titebond/white glue? Most of us know that if we coat a sheet of liteply or balsa with anything wet,it usually curls or warps.

I cure the problem by clamping straight,flat on the workbench,and weighting it down until it dries/cures.

Somebody suggested just letting it dry first,then 'ironing' it together will activate the glue and 'weld' the parts.

What do you think?
I have with Titebond II

I have laminated a bunch of wing half joining spars for use on my Orline Pup build. The originals were in less than poor condition. I put a thin layer on each piece then firmly clamped the pieces together with spring clamps. I did not have any issues with them warping. They were two layers of five ply 1/8" birch to replace the 1/4" originals.

I had also tried the iron method you mentioned, but without experience did not opt to use it for the final job. This method did work, yet without further testing I would personally not use it in primary structure. I did successfully use this method for some sheet skinning though. It does work for thinner pieces.
Oct 18, 2012, 06:45 PM
Bellanca Kruesair
epoxyearl's Avatar
Thread OP
On the laminating with a hot iron,I wonder if it might be about the same strength as 3M spray contact cement..
The only contact cement I've used for building was Southern's Sorghum,for balsa to foam wing core sheeting.That stuff was awesome on a Cap 21 wing.

I'll do a laminating test with the Iron/Titebond and get back to you.
Latest blog entry: Ban Birds.
Oct 18, 2012, 08:18 PM
Registered User
I like the Elmer's wood glue and buy it by the gallon. I'll need another before the snow flies! I also like Ambroid, DUCO and Sigment (they're similar). I have used the 'iron' technique on sheeting but not other stuff. It's pretty strong and the wood breaks before joint lets go. I have used Weldwood contact cement for sheeting, too. The down side of contact cement is if you put part down crooked the chances of lifting and re-positioning are poor! It's tough stuff. Again, the wood breaks before the joint let go. It will delaminate with heat. I stored my glider in a fullscale hangar at 2011 JR Aerotow. It was pretty hot in that hangar and my wingtip skins started to let go. I almost never use CA. Used mostly for making jigs.
Oct 18, 2012, 08:44 PM
Registered User
Sorry for being off topic, but those are some beautiful aircraft ARUP!!! Would you mind posting or sending me a full picture of the Glider? Stellar craftsmanship!

I only use CA now for those knife oops moments. Bonds skin instantly!
Last edited by no1isnormal; Oct 18, 2012 at 08:45 PM. Reason: typo
Oct 18, 2012, 10:20 PM
Be the duck. Whaaaa?
UberZogster's Avatar
I think it is worth mentioning that usually when people are talking about using wood glue for whatever they are usually talking about aliphatic resin. Not all wood glues are aliphatic resin and they can't all be used with the same odd techniques (such as letting it dry of both surfaces then ironing.) If you are going to try something like that I would recommend trying a test piece and seeing if it works.


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