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Sep 09, 2018, 10:50 AM
ski bum
Five bright LEDs on a SE at night create quite an effect! Flown high and quietly, it might puzzle a few people.
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Sep 09, 2018, 12:18 PM
IMO ( In My Opinion ) →
balsa or carbon's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by K2XR10
Five bright LEDs on a SE at night create quite an effect! Flown high and quietly, it might puzzle a few people.
Flying at night with LEDs almost always causes people to stop by and tell us they thought they were seeing a UFO !

HobbyKing has this 9 mode LED system that can change colors & flashing patterns using a two position switch on your TX :
https://hobbyking.com/en_us/9-mode-m...___store=en_us



On one of my speedster planes , I put BRIGHT white LEDs under the clear canopy for excellent daytime orientation ↓ .
Sep 12, 2018, 08:30 PM
ski bum
Quote:
Originally Posted by balsa or carbon
If you're looking for a tough wing , the Crashtesthobby Assassin is nearly indestructible . In this video they fly it repeatedly into a brick wall :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSa5DVzP8iA
Don't know how this plane would respond to every kind of crash, but the possibility that it could survive most mishaps is very intriguing. Think how fast you could learn to fly RC if you could just pick up your plane after every crash, and relaunch it! No expensive, messy, time-wasting repairs.

BTW, there is a nice video about flying in windy conditions. (I may be the only person who hadn't seen it before.) In it, our host mentions the SE by name and speaks well of its ability to handle wind.

And while it may not be as crash proof as the Assassin, it's pretty dang resilient, particularly if you follow gpw's advice and stick to the tall grass. It's also cheap and simple enough to be disposable. Just transfer the electronics to the next SE when the first one gets too dinged up.
Last edited by K2XR10; Sep 14, 2018 at 08:24 PM.
Sep 17, 2018, 11:22 PM
ski bum
Quote:
Originally Posted by balsa or carbon
RCG member Nightstone did so successfully , the elevons need to be full span to be effective : https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...&postcount=216
Just discovered that one need not change the SE into a bank & yank flying wing trainer. You already have the flying wing trainer covered with your SIMPLEST Simple Delta.

It begs to be built and flown. Why not tomorrow?!
Sep 18, 2018, 02:04 AM
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balsa or carbon's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by K2XR10
BTW, there is a nice video about flying in windy conditions. (I may be the only person who hadn't seen it before.) In it, our host mentions the SE by name and speaks well of its ability to handle wind.
In the video , he's talking about the FMS Super EZ :
https://www.motionrc.com/products/fm...v2-fmm096p-pnp
Sep 18, 2018, 02:06 AM
IMO ( In My Opinion ) →
balsa or carbon's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by K2XR10
Just discovered that one need not change the SE into a bank & yank flying wing trainer. You already have the flying wing trainer covered with your SIMPLEST Simple Delta.

It begs to be built and flown. Why not tomorrow?!
If you build a Simplest Simple Delta , let us know how it flies .... with video if possible !
Sep 27, 2018, 06:08 AM
Registered User
Awesome thread B.O.C. I'm definitely going to build one of these too. I need something with a mid motor design. Thanks for sharing. I built the old foggie using foam for the body and the slo-stick and both flew pretty good. The stick ended up 50 ft up in a tree in upstate NY. It's all fun.
Thanks again
Jim
Sep 27, 2018, 12:03 PM
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Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Goodwin
Awesome thread B.O.C. I'm definitely going to build one of these too. I need something with a mid motor design. Thanks for sharing. I built the old foggie using foam for the body and the slo-stick and both flew pretty good. The stick ended up 50 ft up in a tree in upstate NY. It's all fun.
Thanks again
Jim
When you build a Super Easy , show us a video if possible !
Sep 30, 2018, 05:38 PM
Registered User

My SSD story (Happy Ending)


After building and crashing several $-Tree foam board planes (FliteTest Cub, Spitfire, RC Powers SU27, NAMC Mig 35, Experimental Airlines Axon) I realized I need to build a slow flier to improve my skills before consigning my lengthy builds to the garbage can. So after lurking around this thread for a while I built 3 versions. Every one of them flew great and were also very easy to repair due to the simplicity.
I did have great difficulty in getting the C.G. right initially and I tried moving the motor closer to the nose, but this weakened the area just ahead of the prop slot, resulting in the nose section folding back after a bad crash!
Without throwing away the airframe, I simply built fresh new nose sections by neatly cutting off the weakened parts. With the SSD, this is easy to do - You simply build a double layered DTFB triangle and glue it on! This technique let me try various experiments like adding a coroplast platform just for the battery and electronics. That did no work well - it added weight and the point of damage simply moved to the point of transition between the coro and the foam. So I realized the weak, easily replaceable (sacrificial ?) parts should be up front.
To cut a long story short, I made the following changes and now it flies like a dream!
Two longitudinal carbon tubes on either side of the prop slot.
A flight test style boxy fuselage that extends forward a few inches beyond the nose(apex of the delta) - this allows me to use different battery sizes and yet get the C.G right.
A carved EPP nose that fits tightly to the fuse front - works great to absorb minor impacts from nose-in's.
A smaller 3-blade prop to narrow the slot (though I have not filled in the gap yet)

Here are the obligatory videos (I doff my hat to you, balsa or carbon!)
Nickel & Diming for CG Adjustment (2 min 32 sec)

SSD in the Wind (4 min 12 sec)


And here's a short one that demonstrates the flat, slow glides that you can do!
SDD Short Test Flight in Gusty Conditions (1 min 15 sec)
Sep 30, 2018, 05:49 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by K2XR10
Don't know how this plane would respond to every kind of crash, but the possibility that it could survive most mishaps is very intriguing. Think how fast you could learn to fly RC if you could just pick up your plane after every crash, and relaunch it! No expensive, messy, time-wasting repairs.

BTW, there is a nice video about flying in windy conditions. (I may be the only person who hadn't seen it before.) In it, our host mentions the SE by name and speaks well of its ability to handle wind.

And while it may not be as crash proof as the Assassin, it's pretty dang resilient, particularly if you follow gpw's advice and stick to the tall grass. It's also cheap and simple enough to be disposable. Just transfer the electronics to the next SE when the first one gets too dinged up.
Besides that, I also found that it is eminently flyable at slow speeds, allowing more time to recover. As a newbie, most of my crashes were benign, even though I kept the plane low and slow - perhaps the short distance to the ground helped fight the effect of that evil force - gravity
Sep 30, 2018, 07:25 PM
IMO ( In My Opinion ) →
balsa or carbon's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by rkrishnan
After building and crashing several $-Tree foam board planes (FliteTest Cub, Spitfire, RC Powers SU27, NAMC Mig 35, Experimental Airlines Axon) I realized I need to build a slow flier to improve my skills before consigning my lengthy builds to the garbage can. So after lurking around this thread for a while I built 3 versions. Every one of them flew great and were also very easy to repair due to the simplicity.
I did have great difficulty in getting the C.G. right initially and I tried moving the motor closer to the nose, but this weakened the area just ahead of the prop slot, resulting in the nose section folding back after a bad crash!
Without throwing away the airframe, I simply built fresh new nose sections by neatly cutting off the weakened parts. With the SSD, this is easy to do - You simply build a double layered DTFB triangle and glue it on! This technique let me try various experiments like adding a coroplast platform just for the battery and electronics. That did no work well - it added weight and the point of damage simply moved to the point of transition between the coro and the foam. So I realized the weak, easily replaceable (sacrificial ?) parts should be up front.
To cut a long story short, I made the following changes and now it flies like a dream!
Two longitudinal carbon tubes on either side of the prop slot.
A flight test style boxy fuselage that extends forward a few inches beyond the nose(apex of the delta) - this allows me to use different battery sizes and yet get the C.G right.
A carved EPP nose that fits tightly to the fuse front - works great to absorb minor impacts from nose-in's.
A smaller 3-blade prop to narrow the slot (though I have not filled in the gap yet)

Here are the obligatory videos (I doff my hat to you, balsa or carbon!)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DhIhGx6vAPA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QssTH4VEVb0

And here's a short one that demonstrates the flat, slow glides that you can do!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T72u2l6sOcQ
Thanks for sharing your SSD story and videos , I'm glad it was a success for you !

Would you mind posting again in the SSD thread ? : https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...h-simple-plans
Last edited by balsa or carbon; Sep 30, 2018 at 07:30 PM.


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