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Mar 26, 2012, 01:22 AM
Taking care of the pond.
MILLERTIME's Avatar
Very nice work.
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Mar 26, 2012, 03:19 PM
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P_J_Glor's Avatar
This is a very inspiring build. I really like the look of your open cabin doors. I am curious whether you feel you might take in water at the doors and what you might be planning to avoid water geting into the hull.

Pete G.
Mar 27, 2012, 02:38 AM
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proteque's Avatar
This is heading for greatness. I find plastic very hard to handle. It seems you don't have the same problem!
Mar 27, 2012, 12:58 PM
Tinkerer in Training
RGinCanada's Avatar
Nice work! I am looking forward to seeing more pics. (hint)
Mar 28, 2012, 02:00 AM
Towing for a living
Quote:
Originally Posted by P_J_Glor
This is a very inspiring build. I really like the look of your open cabin doors. I am curious whether you feel you might take in water at the doors and what you might be planning to avoid water geting into the hull.

Pete G.
In real life, open deck level doors are a major contributor in the sinking of a huge percentage of tugboats. Engineers often have a nasty habit of leaving the deck level engineer room water tight doors open to let the engines breath better.
Mar 28, 2012, 06:52 AM
Registered User
rlboats2003's Avatar

I am really enjoying this!


Lichbote

I am really enjoying this because I am right in the middle of doing the same thing just a different Tug from a different period. I am using the payson mite and the arnold s for making templates to create a 45 foot 1920 steam tug in 1/48 scale to be mounted on a Lindberg coast guard tug hull.

I was wondering - How did you complete your templates from plans, well I am assuming that is what you did. Because the next project I plan on doing that.

I have attached a couple of pictures to date.

Keep up the great work, this is providing allot of ideas.

Happiness,
Rich
Last edited by rlboats2003; Mar 28, 2012 at 07:23 AM.
Mar 28, 2012, 12:07 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by MILLERTIME
Very nice work.
Thanks, MT.

Im trying my level best.
Mar 28, 2012, 12:16 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Hi Pete.

Quote:
Originally Posted by P_J_Glor
This is a very inspiring build. I really like the look of your open cabin doors. I am curious whether you feel you might take in water at the doors and what you might be planning to avoid water geting into the hull.

Pete G.

Thanks.

If i made everything allright, it should take not more water than any boat with closed doors. The deck is a complete closed layer, i only made holes (for cables) in rooms that have no opening to the outside. So, if any water enters through the open doors, it should stay in these rooms until the run is done and i empty it out, if/when drying the boat.

The biggest danger of taking water is the seal between the deck and the frame of the hull, where the 2 mayor parts are joined.

At least thats the way i planned it.
Mar 28, 2012, 12:19 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by proteque
This is heading for greatness. I find plastic very hard to handle. It seems you don't have the same problem!
Its the same as with everything - when you get used to it, it gets easier.

"Practice" is the magic word here, too.
Mar 28, 2012, 12:25 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tug Jaguar
In real life, open deck level doors are a major contributor in the sinking of a huge percentage of tugboats. Engineers often have a nasty habit of leaving the deck level engineer room water tight doors open to let the engines breath better.

Interesting insider knowlede, thanks for that.

I opened them cause they were open on the most of the few wartime pics ive found, and i liked the different look.

I planned to crew it later with some of the sailors provided with the Revell Flower-class, to make it more "lively" - and i thought open doors will take a part in that, too. Closed doors look so much more static.
Mar 28, 2012, 12:35 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Hi Rich.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rlboats2003
Lichbote

I am really enjoying this because I am right in the middle of doing the same thing just a different Tug from a different period. I am using the payson mite and the arnold s for making templates to create a 45 foot 1920 steam tug in 1/48 scale to be mounted on a Lindberg coast guard tug hull.

I have attached a couple of pictures to date.
Looks like great start. But i have no idea what this is: "the payson mite and the arnold s for making templates"

(Im german and not so used with your language, and or stuff from your side of the Atlantic. )


Quote:
Originally Posted by rlboats2003
I was wondering - How did you complete your templates from plans, well I am assuming that is what you did. Because the next project I plan on doing that.

Keep up the great work, this is providing allot of ideas.

Happiness,
Rich
Unfortunately ive found no plans for this class of tugs, only for the smaller 60ft TANAC-class, which looks completly different. So i have to calculate from pics - my pocket calculator gets the same amount of use as my exacto.


Thanks, giving ideas is always a good thing - building something out of Styrene from scratch is not that hard, but when starting such work for the first time ..... sometimes it helps to get a push in the right direction to get it working.
Mar 28, 2012, 01:01 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by RGinCanada
Nice work! I am looking forward to seeing more pics. (hint)
By your command.


Not much to show yet, as the done stuff was a little bit time-consuming.

First i made the stern part of the bulwark, then i glued some 1mm round strips around the top edge, to get the rounded look. On the edge of the stern i used a slit tube with more dia.


The Graupner doublecross bollard had a much to massive plate on the bottom - i sanded it down to a more realistic thickness. Then i drilled 1mm holes through the upright parts, next to the whole height.




Glued some brass rod in the holes




And drilled some matching holes in the deck (reinforced on the underside with additional layers of ps-sheet) - this will give a much more reliable bonding when towing ships




Next step was cutting the struts on the bulwarks inside, a lot of them - three cheers for the Quee ..... h for my trusty ol chopper Hes really a big help when cutting a lot of equal sized strips/parts.




Used a small part of styrene to get them evenly placed




It was a boring job, but it really improves the look of the boat.




Counterchecking with my scale-sailor

Mar 28, 2012, 01:21 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
The funnel - 3 layers of 0,3mm sheet laminated around a core is much easier to handle than trying it with 1mm sheet.






The scuppers got their "bars"




And i created the mounting for the raised area in the back




First i wanted to use etched grating, but the i decided to use teardrop-sheet




Made the side-bollards from 1mm sheet and the shortened kit-bollards




In the back




And in the front (the one on the right side is slighly longer and has a tiny hole, there will later the anchor-davit be mounted)




The bow bollard and the mounting for the flag





Sometime inbetween the openings for the chain were made, too.


The funnel after some sanding and getting his band




It starts to look like a ship, didnt it?

Mar 28, 2012, 01:30 PM
Registered User
rlboats2003's Avatar

Should have realized your in Germany


I have supplied to small pictures of the tug pieces. The profile is the Arnold S. a 1/2 inch to the foot kit here from this I am using the pilothouse and the look of the hull the one that looks like a plan is the Mite (form a popular modeling book here in the US). I am using the deckhouse configuration fro this boat.

If you look a the work bench picture you will see a bunch of templates that I made to make each one of the parts. When the pictures was taken the back wall o the deckhouse was not glued in yet. Once the basic build is complete the pilot and deckhouse will cover in scribed siding to give a wood look.

All this is being done in 1/48 scale simmilar to 1/50 in England, or close to 6.35mm if 24.4 mm = 1 inch divided by 4. Just a little larger that you 1/72 scale.

I figured I would throw in some scable chats and signs that you could print and use inside the tug, sorry the signs are not in german.

Happiness,
Rich
Mar 28, 2012, 11:20 PM
Registered User
As many times as I have cussed the quality of, and as many parts as I have discarded from Lindberg kits over the years it is amazing to me how great this build looks! You really are a master at kitbashing as illustrated in this build. I guess I just never had the patience to try and make a silk purse from a Lindberg sows ear.
Foo


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