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Old Oct 09, 2003, 01:37 PM
houfek is offline
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Warmliner-How long are motor runs ?


I just got my first warmliner (Highlander) with the recommended AXI brushless from HL.....I have not seen anyone fly these things.......what is the usual procedure? Do you just fly them for the 30-45 seconds WOT in a climb, then shut it down and play for awhile with no motor power ?? Do you ever run them for the whole flight ?? When doing a high speed dive do you shut down the motor as soon as you point the nose downward ?? When do you start it up again ?? Is there some minimum time you need to wait between WOT bursts ??

Sorry for what must be an elementary question for many of you, but after 10 years of RC, this is a new flight regime for me !!

Thanks....

Jim
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Old Oct 09, 2003, 01:58 PM
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Whatever suits your particular model and flying style.
There is no "right way"..
..a
Old Oct 09, 2003, 02:03 PM
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Jim,

With a glider, usual practice is climb with motor on and get to a comfortable altitude and shut motor off to glide. Look for thermal, dive...whatever you like to do. Depends on the power system you have, that determine the duration of climb(motor on). The F5 class gliders can disappear in 10-15 seconds going straight up. Your might be climbing at 60 degree up (depends on motor power) for 20-30 seconds. Set up the motor on a switch(retract, trainer), to turn on the speed control(ESC). You don't need anything between motor off and motor full on.

You glide until you are not comfortable with the altitude of your plane, then power up again to climb. IF you are a power flyer, it might take a while to get use to the "dead stick" flying. Remember, gravity is your friend in gliding, don't keep pulling up, you end up in a stall. Forward speed translates to lift.

If you list your power system components, most of us hanging around this forum can give you an educated guess on how long your motor will run per flight.

Good luck, welcome to the world of sailplanes.

Brian, an EAJ.
Old Oct 09, 2003, 02:22 PM
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Thanks, Brian....
The tip on the "on/off" is a good one.....I would certainly have used CH 3 as I am used to doing with my other stuff......

Didn't know you were into the sail stuff.....I am used to seeing your comments on the SF listserve.......

Also...was born in San Mateo.....Mills Hospital. Small world, indeed !!

Thanks again.....

Jim
Old Oct 09, 2003, 03:41 PM
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Jim, who?

Mills? My daughter was born there too. But no more baby made there! Hospital still there but out patient only.

When do you fly?

Brian, an EAJ.
Old Oct 09, 2003, 08:10 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by houfek
The tip on the "on/off" is a good one.....I would certainly have used CH 3 as I am used to doing with my other stuff......
A switch is usually used for motor control only when the radio offers no other choice. In your case, I recommend hooking up your throttle the same way you're doing it with your other stuff, unless you need that stick for another function, such as spoilerons. You'll be better off with variable throttle control than if you just toggle the motor between full off and full on. It's less sudden plane-rolling torque that way, and it gives you the option of partial throttle, which certainly doesn't hurt even if you rarely use it. For example, I use momentary partial throttle to test my motor just before launching, and some folks run their motors at low speed to slow their planes for landing.
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Old Oct 10, 2003, 01:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Miami Mike
For example, I use momentary partial throttle to test my motor just before launching, and some folks run their motors at low speed to slow their planes for landing.
Mike,

I guess you don't fly gliders. To test motor, just bump the switch really quick, the ESC won't not have time to go full-on. To use the motor to slow the plane down. With glider, you would risk burning the motor or esc if you forget to turn off motor when the plane touches down. It would work with wheel. On a glider, the throttle stick are usually for spoiler or flap.

Brian, an EAJ.
Old Oct 10, 2003, 12:51 PM
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Jim-
I fly a Filip/Highlander also. I'd be interested in hearing how your AXI setup performs. I have a geared Mega in mine. With a 10-second motor run I'm pretty high, that's where I usually shut down the motor and either look for thermals or do dives and rolls or big loops. A 15-second motor run puts it very high, uncomfortable for me to do anything but thermal seeking when it's that small. This is a fun plane to use the motor in short climbing bursts, and then glide or dive. I use spoilerons on the left stick, they are very useful for controlling the landing or for coming down from speck height. I have the throttle function on a side-slider, but a switch would also be OK.

-Tracy
Old Oct 10, 2003, 10:47 PM
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I don't fly competition but I find I like the throttle on the left stick and a preset on a switch for spoiler. The amount of spoiler on a warm or hotliner seems to make little difference as long as you get 25 degrees or more, not like flaps where drag increases tremendously past 40 degrees. Is anyone running more than 40 degees on spoilerons?

Jordan
Old Oct 11, 2003, 12:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by bhchan
I guess you don't fly gliders.
Actually Brian, Mike flys a LOT of gliders. I think his current passion is his Hook, and before that he was flying his Bandit.

Just because many fly with the motor on a switch and use the throttle stick for flaps/spoilers/crow doesn't mean we ALL do.

I suspect many using an 8U transmitter use a throttle switch because they have no other option if they want to use the throttle stick for the above mentioned use.

I enjoy having proportional control of my throttle and have it on one of the sliders of my 9C. I much prefer a softer start rather than a full on/full off motor. Sure helps reduce those torque rolls....and I like having proportional control of my throttle. If I'm coming up short a little throttle sure is handy.
Last edited by Mauilvr; Oct 11, 2003 at 12:48 AM.
Old Oct 11, 2003, 08:42 AM
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Hey, I do both (switch and throttle).
I also have models with spoilerons on a switch and others where it's on throttle.

They both work, but spoilers on throttle stick gives much more precise control for spot landing. I use spoilers on switch for my hotliners and F5B and I'm not shooting for spot landings. In competition, however, I would be..
..a
Old Oct 11, 2003, 11:01 AM
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I think we need more tranmitters out there that have slides for some of the functions like the new Multiplex Evo transmitters. When I started in this hobby (1970) many of the transmitters had slides on the front for the fifth and sixth channels. As marvelous as our radios are, with the cheap processors and flash memory we should get even more than we do for the money. I would imagine a 128 meg flash memory chip in quantity is probably $1, so why do we only get 4-10 model memory on most radios?

Jordan
Old Oct 11, 2003, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Andy W
.....but spoilers on throttle stick gives much more precise control for spot landing.
I agree completely. I wasn't clear in my previous post but that's still where I prefer them also.

Having the sliders on the 9C allows me to have proportional throttle too. I love those sliders.....
Old Oct 11, 2003, 09:22 PM
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That's what I figured.

(posted before I even finished reading Ric's post)
I think the 9C has sliders on the sides?
(..)

I gotta get me one of them..
..a
Old Oct 11, 2003, 10:16 PM
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Quote:
I think the 9C has sliders on the sides?
Yep - one on each side.

Actually, being able to use the throttle stick for spoilers/flaps/crow/whatever and still have proportional control of the throttle is one of the major things that sold me on the 9C - otherwise I probably would have just got an 8U (a great radio, IMO).

The proportional sliders allow a lot of creative versatility.


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