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Sep 30, 2011, 06:43 PM
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rlboats2003's Avatar
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I just received my Dumas George W. Washburn from Tower Hobbies


Hey you expect good shipping from Tower and they really deliviered on this did not look like any thing touched all the way here.

If you plan on building this boat I can suggest 2 references: a) Tugboats by Steve Shaw, start at the amazon used book store, It will not set you back to much but what you want from this book are the paintings done by Steve Cryan, when you open the book the entire forpace is a 2 page picture of Cornell Steamboat tugs at Roundout. b)The other book is the History of Cornell Steamboat - Thomas Cornell and the Cornell Steamboat Company, by Stuart Murray. There is an 1890 picture in the as delivered look of this tug, some very interesting information about the 1921 boiler refitt and that when the second stack appeared and a third picture in the late 1930s. Again if your interest is also to know about this company this is in an excellent book.

Initial impression of the kit - It smelled good when you open it - has the usual instructions, and there is tons of lazer cut. After I reviewed the contents I ordered the 2373 Prop and shaft parts from the Dumas on line store - so right know I am at about 220.00. Add to that a 2004 Dumas motor 5,000 mil amp 7.2 battery pack about another $114.00. that should end the spending till I can get in to the kit itself.

OK here is some small issues that are apparent from the pictures on the boxes - The photograped boxtop model had 2 things that is off the wall.
a) the life boats are sitting on what looks like saw horses. Cornell did note use big saw horses to be under their lifeboat on davits.
b) the second off the wall is a real nice laser cut ready to assemble Winch that is suppose to be put the aft Deckhouse. What is on the deckhouse is a 3 bit Towing system. (much like what the alantic tug has after you get rid of the tow hook.

I have still some things I want to look for, like does the kit have windows and portholes. But that is another day - what to find a couple of references and take a deeper look at the kit,tommorrow. Going to stop know and get ready to order some real boat parts. I think the only thing that would upset me is if while the laser was cutting the did not cut out the pliot house windows and doors as well as the main cabin.

Going to go,
Rich
Last edited by rlboats2003; Oct 03, 2011 at 10:00 AM. Reason: updates of additional information
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Oct 04, 2011, 07:44 AM
Stilwell Shipyard
lslewis's Avatar
You made me laugh, quote "that should end the spending"
Have fun
Hurricane Larry
Oct 04, 2011, 11:35 AM
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Tim B.'s Avatar

Lackawanna ?


Morning, in my ignorance, I ask is this kit a twist on a Lackawanna, or a different model ?
Thanks.
Oct 05, 2011, 12:55 PM
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rlboats2003's Avatar
Thread OP

It is a new Model


This is not a twist on the Lackawanna, it is a complete new model, My next posting is going to be taking the various parts out of the box and photographing - which should include the dumas running hardware kit and the motor kit. Along with this group I will probably have some other pictures to include of the GW herself.

Just need to get home in the hous for more than 20 - 30 minutes (Like tonight)

Happy Modeling, Rich
Oct 05, 2011, 02:14 PM
Grumpa Tom
Kmot's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rlboats2003

OK here is some small issues that are apparent from the pictures on the boxes - The photograped boxtop model had 2 things that is off the wall.
a) the life boats are sitting on what looks like saw horses. Cornell did note use big saw horses to be under their lifeboat on davits.
Looking at this painting by an artist named Muller, of the GWW in 1925, it sure does look like it is on sawhorse style supports.
Oct 05, 2011, 07:27 PM
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rlboats2003's Avatar
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That is Interesting


Well in a B &W picture of the GWW with the single stack (prior to the boiler update of 1921) has the boat sitting upside down on the celestory roof, davits are on the port side, and then in the same book after the 1921 twin stack conversion, a starboard look and the boat still looks on the celestory roof upside down. This was in the book Thomas Cornell and the Cornell Steamboat Company. In Tugboats, the Steven Cryan painting of Roundout with all the Tugs at the shops and a stern picture of the GWW the lifeboat was on chocks on the celestory roof, the painting is circa 1940. So Based on the 2 pictures that I have and the one painting, I may have miss judged the truth - what your picture does show is that a some point the boat may have had sawhorse style chocks. I guess then it depends on time frame.

Thanks Kmot for the input and the enlightment,
Rich
Last edited by rlboats2003; Oct 05, 2011 at 07:37 PM.
Oct 06, 2011, 02:33 AM
WooHoo!
woodybob's Avatar
Looks like it'll make a nice tug.
Oct 20, 2011, 01:15 PM
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rlboats2003's Avatar
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Thoughts of a scale model, an anaylsis of the G W Washburn Kit


Just taking the kits dimensions and muplity by 4 (since it is 1/48)

The Kit hull is 30 inches long with a 5.5 beam. Since the kit is suppose to be in 1/48 that means the hull length 120 scale feet with a beam of 22 scale feet. Both the book on Cornell Steamboat and On the Hawser identify the length (and I have to assume that since the tug was built on the east coast it is BP) 123 feet with 26 foot beam. So if we add the counter of the stern estimated at 15 to 18 feet to the hull bp length to obtain the "length over all" would be 123+17 =140 feet or 35 inches long. The beam will have to become 6.5 inches to get the 26 feet identified in the books. So the hull has to be lengthened about 5 inches and the beam widen 1 inch. Which will also mean that the Deckhouse will have to be lengthened to match the hull length.

In it its time, the GW Washburn was considered the King of the Hudson for is Power, Maneuverability and Appearance and admired as one of the most handsome examples of a Towing Tug in the newly industrialized US, so if you are looking for a semi-scale kit of a late 19 century tug this is a good kit, but if you are looking for scale fidelity, be prepared to widen the beam, lengthen the distance between fames and making a new keel to attach all this to.

This does not even broach the subject of the towing machine for the deckhouse when ever available picture shows a 3 vertical support towing bit on the deckhouse, and decals for the raised panels and the black vinyl windows that have become trademarks of the new kits available from this manufacture. These things a modeler can live with and make or purchase separately.

So is it a good kit No, not when a company failed to exhaust several available resources that provided stated dimensions to start with. This is the 3rd Dumas kit that I have purchased that suffers from this lack of research, the Lackawanna 33 inch overall hull which yields the 132 ft BP, not the length overall of the vessel, the Army ST 74 feet LOA in 1/48 and the hull is 18 inches long which yields 72 feet LOA.

The only positive thing that can be said for this trend is, we as model boaters are getting something to build that makes a reasonable looking model I have to thank Dumas for that. But I have to wonder if the concept of making a scale model of the prototype by a kit manufacturer has been lost?

And yes I will keep on buying Dumas kits since I only model american water craft the market is limited for me.

The next posting by me will be what is inside the box - Pictures and Pictures of the prototype.

Happiness
Rich
Oct 20, 2011, 05:34 PM
Grumpa Tom
Kmot's Avatar
Perhaps, like in the model airplane world, these Dumas models should be referred to and advertised as "stand off scale".
Oct 20, 2011, 07:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmot
Perhaps, like in the model airplane world, these Dumas models should be referred to and advertised as "stand off scale".
It's all good... I doubt any boat in my fleet measures out to be true scale.
Oct 21, 2011, 12:55 PM
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Gravman's Avatar
Some would be "stand way off scale"
Latest blog entry: Myrtle Corey
Oct 21, 2011, 01:35 PM
Submarines, etc.
tsenecal's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravman
Some would be "stand way off scale"
i prefer to use "stand off and squint scale"
Oct 21, 2011, 11:01 PM
Taking care of the pond.
MILLERTIME's Avatar
And wear dark sunglasses.
Oct 22, 2011, 08:44 PM
Deckineer at large
nova55's Avatar
Cornell was indeed known for there deck house mounted H bitts, but I know recently I have seen photos one at least one of there tugs with a steam powered towing machine in its place. But damnit, I cant remember where!

A side note is the Cornell shops, are still there and intact. It is a very, very impressive building inside. Our dock is up the street.
Oct 24, 2011, 08:22 AM
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rlboats2003's Avatar
Thread OP

Reference Picture of the Washburn


As noted early here are some pictures of the G W Washburn and their sources:

If you plan on building this boat I can suggest 3 references: a) "Tugboats" by Steve Shaw, start at the amazon used book store, It will not set you back to much but what you want from this book are the paintings done by Steve Cryan, when you open the book the entire forpace is a 2 page picture of Cornell Steamboat tugs at Roundout. b)The other book is the History of Cornell Steamboat - "Thomas Cornell and the Cornell Steamboat Company", by Stuart Murray. There is an 1890 picture in the as delivered look of this tug, some very interesting information about the 1921 boiler refitt and that when the second stack appeared and a third picture in the late 1930s. Again if your interest is also to know about this company this is in an excellent book. c) A third references would be "On the Hawser" by Steven Lang. The History of Cornell and On the Hawser have an appendix section with stats on the size of all the tugs in the book.

OK the next pictures will be of the Kit - needless to say I stand corrected on the use of the saw horse style life boat stands - but this should give you an idea about how the Washburn evolved over time - please note in 1921 the addition (look at the port shots) of a door on in the hull to shovel ash overboard.

Going to go for now,
Rich
Last edited by rlboats2003; Oct 24, 2011 at 12:31 PM.


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