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Sep 12, 2003, 09:50 PM
Faster Faster!!
RCFlybry's Avatar
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Nostalgic Fever Anyone? Got Pics?


If names such as Aquila, Paragon, Windfreak, Viking, and Monterey bring up blank stares then probably not. However if when hearing these, they strike a common chord like discussing Ford or Chevrolet, then maybe there are still some out their with the fever. Those that enjoy the hours in the shop building these old beauties. Names like Thornburg, Renaud, Slobod and others that really put together some sweet looking birds!
I'm just finishing a Bird of Time which caused me to take a look at other plans from this time frame. I think the Aquila is next on my list. I was curious if anyone has pictures of sailplanes from the past that they used to fly? Who knows.. maybe they're still in one piece and have become your "Old Faithful"
Care to show 'em off? I'd love to take a look.

Bryan
Last edited by RCFlybry; Sep 12, 2003 at 09:52 PM.
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Sep 12, 2003, 10:02 PM
Hot Dawg Glider Pilot
schrederman's Avatar

Nostalgia


If you're not a member already, join the balsasailplanes yahoo group. There's lots of NOS stuff there, and more showing up all the time. I'm watching the door for an Astro Jeff kit as we speak, and my scratch BoT is posted here. I have 2 scratch built Legionairs, and their pics are on the balsasailplanes site, under Jack's Pics in the photo section. Enjoy your BoT.

Jack Womack
Sep 13, 2003, 04:43 AM
Registered User
Just remember that the spars of many of these beautiful birds were originally used with six volt winches and even then had to be launched with restraint to survive. Unless the spars and joiners are updated they shouldn't be use with 12 volt winches unless great care is taken not to overstress the wings. That's why the Nostalga Class rules allow spars and tow hooks to be beefed up so that 12 volt winches and current launch techniques can be safely employed.
Sep 13, 2003, 06:50 AM
Faster Faster!!
RCFlybry's Avatar
Thread OP
Thanks for the tip Ollie. With a two man crew, one flying the plane and the other working the winch pedal, we had some great success last week. We were able to winch up a Gentle Lady and my friends Aquila with no trouble.
We are running the Ford Longshaft Starter motor on a 12 volt system. We were able to get about 15 successful launches with a light foot on the pedal. I really like winching as even though we didn't have any trouble on any of the launches, It gives you more control over the launch. It took a few launches to get tapping the pedal down, but after that we were able to keep the launch well in the safe limits of both wings. However I could tell that a full foot on the winch could be big trouble. There's enough power there to jerk Fat Albert out of a VW Bug. :-)

Bryan
Sep 13, 2003, 07:16 AM
Motorless Wing Nut
How about a sailplane from the past that I fly now?

My Aquila...


BTW, that's a Prophet on the left behind me and a Sagitta on the right. They belong to other club members.

Dave
Last edited by Doc Data; Mar 14, 2005 at 09:39 AM.
Sep 13, 2003, 08:18 AM
Registered User
Here's pictures of my first, and my most recent planes:

The first is a Midwest Lil T. I picked it because I like the looks; it was definitely not the best choice I could have made at the time. It was designed for rudder only, so I converted it to 2 channel operation. Despite it's deficiencies, I still managed to teach myself to fly with it. I may build another someday. I still think it's a looker. The picture was taken in 1978 at Eldorado Park in Long Beach, CA.

Fast forward to 2003, upper Michigan, 4 kids and many planes later:

Second shot is my Oly 2, just completed this summer, being held by my 5 year old daughter. What a great flying ship! Back when I was starting out it seemed like everyone was flying an Oly, but I had to be different... So now I finally have one. I was going for the box art look but didn't have enough orange moneykote so couldn't quite duplicate it.

I love the old floaters. I've owned a bunch over the years, several of which I would like to build again, like: Monterey, my second plane; Mirage, my all time favorite; Aquila, one of the prettiest of 'em all (and I have one NIB that I may build this winter); and I really should have a BOT.

Cheers,
Dave
Sep 13, 2003, 08:21 AM
Registered User
And here's the Oly 2

Cheers,
Dave
Sep 13, 2003, 08:28 AM
Registered User
Found another picture, this one is my Mirage, taken about '82, also at Eldorado Park. I had my longest thermal flight ever with this plane, 1 hour 26 minutes.


Cheers,
Dave
Sep 13, 2003, 05:34 PM
Faster Faster!!
RCFlybry's Avatar
Thread OP
Yeah!! Now that's what I'm talkin about. Jack, Doc, Kingbee very nice Sailplanes indeed. These are the planes that stand the test of time and become old reliable classics. Cmon guys.. I'd love to see more..

Bryan
Sep 13, 2003, 05:38 PM
Registered User
Contrary to what was stated above, the planes we are discussing here, typically mid-to-late-1970's designs, were NOT meant to be launched only on a 6 volt winch. We used quite powerful winches with long-shaft Ford starter motors and 12 V batteries (in many cases with no brake to prevent backlashes) to launch the Aquila, Oly II, Bird of Time, etc. as well as more fragile 2 meter planes such as the Gentle Lady. What you had to do was develop actual skill in launching, using your eyes, ears, foot, hands, and (especially) brain, simultaneously. You learned to pulse the winch appropriately for the airplane, wind, etc. Composite materials have now allowed full-on launches, with comparatively little skill required in winch operation. The fact that such launches will break the wing of a spruce/balsa/Monokote glider is indicative of lack of operator skill, not of faulty design. There is actually a reasonable margin between the forces applied during a good, high launch of these older planes and the forces that will break the wing. That said, faulty construction and poor materials selection (see threads on the ARF Bird of Time) can diminish or eliminate this margin, even for someone with appropriate skill and experience in launching.

Stepping off the soapbox now, to go look for some old photos . . . . .
Sep 13, 2003, 10:30 PM
Registered User
Wind Shadow's Avatar

Memories!......


Hey guys,
this thread has really brought back the memories for me!
Great pics, and neat musings.

I built, and taught myself to fly, a Oly II back in the 70's--I believe it was 1977 or '78.

I still remember the thrill of having REAL control of my shiny new sailplane, AFTER I got the rudder pushrod on the correct side of the servo!(yup, first THREE flight attempts--had rudder reversed! but the Oly survived!)

No such thing as servo reversing on the radio--newbies got it made now.

I ended up having literally HUNDREDS of two hour + flights with that glider over the next 5 years or so, flew everyday after work..weather permitting.Wind, heat, cold..flew in darn near anything.
I was too naive(flew alone--hi-start was ALWAYS ready!) to know that the Oly wasn't known for great penetration in the wind---if the wind was blowing over 15mph, I put in about a pound and a half of steel in it! Penetration?? No problem!
Even got to the point where it became a "thing" for me to launch only once when I went flying....I "Expected" to launch, find lift, and STAY up until the batteries got low!
Wish I could do that now...matter of fact wish I could get anywhere NEAR the airtime now, that I did as a "youngin".

Sorry for the rambling----but those oldie gliders just brought back a lot of smiles for me!!!
Wind Shadow
Sep 13, 2003, 10:56 PM
Doc Data you have inspired me. Months ago I built an Aquila fuselage (still uncovered) and tail components (covered Monokote transparent orange) but postponed starting the wings. After staring at your beautiful Aquila picture for 15 minutes I am going to get busy on the wings. I will be using the Eppler 193 airfoil for the wings (I have the ribs already cut) rather than using the original Aquila flat bottom airfoil. I forgot how beautiful that plane can be when properly built. It brings back fond memories. I also enjoy the Prophet 941, Sagitta 900, Pulsar (100''). I will probably build a Bird of Time and Aquila XL eventually. I prefer to hand pick the wood and hand cut all the parts as it brings more enjoyment when flying.
Sep 13, 2003, 11:36 PM
Faster Faster!!
RCFlybry's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
No such thing as servo reversing on the radio--newbies got it made now.
Man! You went so far back that I plumb forgot about servo reversing. I remember thinking how cool it was when you could finally do that without all the hassle. What?? you mean I can reverse 'em with just the flick of a switch? Cool!!
Remember the Futaba Gold Box? I think I've still got one or two in a box downstairs. Some sweet looking planes have been posted!!
Doc Data, I gotta tell you, That Aquila strikes a song in my heart man. Beautiful covering job.
Doing great. Keep 'em coming!

Bryan
Sep 13, 2003, 11:52 PM
Registered User
leverick's Avatar

Vintage Salaire??


Here's a vintage salaire (we think) from circa 1978- 1979. It was built by my now brother in law and his father back then (both can't recall the model name). Flown off a small hill into the side of a barn on its first flight, then stored in the barn rafters for 20 years or so. When I met my new brother in law 3 years ago and he discovered I was into RC sailplanes, well the rest is history. He went and dusted off this plane did the repairs then brought it along on a visit. We spent one long night ( couple bottles of good vino) getting it set up with a new receiver and linkage. At midnight we walked across the street to "test" fly it in the park. A soft hand launch to check the trim and it dissapeared into the darkness and landed softly at the end of the park.

Another long story short we flew the heck out of this plane off a Hi-start and Chris (Bro. in Law) got wired in and bought a 2 meter Aspire and really grooved when I handed down an Avenger DLG.

THEN it happened (picture #2). He came down to the ranch for a weekend of flying early this summer. All was going well until he 1st: planted his DLG into a tree in the morning: 2nd, forgot to reverse a servo on the Aspire an augered it in launching off the hi start,then 3rd: Specked the Salaire out in strong ridge lift then was zooming way too fast penetrating away from the ridge which pulled the right side elevator off the ship causing an augered crash from about 1000 AGL. It was the saddest day of flying I've ever experienced. This Salaire was such a nice plane to fly, very forgiving and what a floater.

He's constantly monitoring Ebay now trying to pick up a new Salaire kit as a replacement.

CHEERS,

Leverick
Sep 13, 2003, 11:56 PM
Registered User
leverick's Avatar

CARNAGE


Here's my brother in law with the remains of his quiver of air weapons after the "Day of Carnage"


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