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Dec 03, 2014, 12:55 AM
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Someone was asking about these engines recently
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Ignition-...item259a8c66d6
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Dec 03, 2014, 09:17 AM
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mchandrayan's Avatar
Bill,
When you figure out how to mount those mufflers on the Gold Cup twin, it would be interesting to know .
Dec 03, 2014, 05:12 PM
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williame3590's Avatar
Just rotate one cylinder.

Bill
Dec 03, 2014, 06:44 PM
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Wall to wall FOX Combat Specials !

Starting on the very top row (each "row" = 3 images), we see the first Schnuerle ported Combat Special from Duke Fox, the 1975 36X BB, aka the CS Mk. II (or "Baldy"). This is actually the 2nd variant, the first having a web inside the exhaust stack. Up until the time this engine appeared, 5 previous Combat Specials had appeared (the first in 1957) but all had baffled pistons with loop scavenging. The switch to ball bearings (from the 3 previous engines' needle bearings) probably due to the ever increasing horsepower, with the increase in Nitro vs. the decrease in oil causing bearing failure. OS suffered similar problems with needle rollers on the big end of their MAX H 80 Marine, first version (see the very bottom row for another problem that arose from the quest for more HP & higher RPM ). The Combat Special MK II is the second version of Fox's first Schnuerle ported engine. The changes were minor, the exhaust bridge was removed and the needle valve improved to operate better when using bladder pressure. When the (Perry Ported ?) Super Tigre Combat 35's came out the 1965 Fox 36X BB users were at a speed disadvantage. Fox came out with this first Schnuerle 36 BB to regain the advantage. These motors were real strong runners but unfortunately shared the same Achilles heel that the C35's had. When combat flyers started using fuels with 40% or more nitro, it wasn't long before the crank snapped. These engines have a very strange looking sleeve but Duke Fox wanted to use a similar crankcase to the 36X and used a cut away sleeve bottom to channel the fuel up around the piston

On the 2nd row we see the 1976 CS Mk. III. The Mark III FOX Combat Special was one of only two CS models to have "Combat Special" written on the side, the IV being the other. The second Schnuerle ported Special to appear, the first though with the tall, 6-bolt "back door" backplate. The very last photo below (ie #22) shows the 29 size Mk. III (note "29" stamped on top of lug)

Third row, we have the CS Mk. IV (or 4). This engine was released to replace the Mk. III. The changes were minor as the Mk. III was already "king of the hill" in Fast Combat, but there were some issues when used for Slow Combat and not enough protection for the front bearing to keep out dirt. The Mk. IV solved these issues by changing the intake, making it taller and adding two NVA locations - one for slow and one for fast combat. Duke also made the front bearing cover larger to go over the front bearing to keep the dirt out. November 1980 dated instruction leaflet. The Mk. IV was also available in a 29 size. Some nice photo's of my own Mk. IV back on page 15 !

Fourth row should contain the Combat Special Mk. V, but that engine does not actually exist. Instead is shown the 1987 36 BB which according to Volume 2 of the A.M.E.E. is "Essentially a Series 5", the first 36 BB "Series 5" appearing in 1983. This engine was released as a slow combat engine and Hi-Performance sport motor. It uses Mk. IV innards in a single (rear) ball bearing case, the front ball bearing of the Mk. IV being replaced with a plain front bearing. This was a successful Slow Combat engine and when speed limited Combat became popular, the venturi inserts were modified by some flyers with some brass tubing to further restrict the engine, so as to be a good Slow Combat engine. The button head, sleeve timings, and crank opening are all identical to the Mk. IV and with the venturi restrictor removed they were almost identical in power to the Mk. IV. This engine was sold for a few years alongside the Mk. IV CS, but was not a big seller. June 1983 dated instruction leaflet, and the box lid calls it a "FOX MK. V 36 Combat"

Fifth row, the CS Mk. VI
The Mark VI (or 6) Combat Special was arguably the best of the FOX Combat Series, with ABC piston / liner. However, the early Mk. 6's employed a steel liner with an aluminium piston which had a thin iron band around the top. Although down a tad power wise to the following Mk. VII, the 6 enjoyed much better durability. Note that although the instruction leaflet shown is dated May, 1991, the Mk. VI actually dates from early 1987

Sixth row, the CS Mk. VII
The 1994 Mark VII (or 7) FOX Combat Special utilised the chrome plated aluminum cylinder liner. This latter feature was not a huge success, as although it saved about an ounce in weight, the plating tended to peel off (as on the HGK engines) giving a short life, forcing owners to retro-fit the earlier Mk. VI piston & liner.

Bottom row, shows firstly the last of the needle bearing Combat Specials, the 1962 Series III. At this point in time, problems with fuel starvation were also starting to appear, and Dukes solution is shown in the paperwork (plus some personal advice from George Moir)
Last edited by Twin Stack; Mar 06, 2021 at 08:35 PM.
Dec 03, 2014, 07:08 PM
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Two of the "good ones", an early VEGA 30 Serial # 5 (top row) and # 011 on bottom (note different carbs)
".......these VEGA engines were built by John Harbone, initially in the 61 size for his own personal use (the very first engine however, was an in-line 4 inspired by the Ford car engine, John having had a background in the motor trade). Demand for the VEGA engine grew rapidly as more flyers admired the engines lugging power (its not a hot-rod and was never intended to be) and quietness, and the engines made by John were essentially reliable and trouble free. However, at one very short stage in their history, both the 60's & 90's were made by an enthusiastic outside contractor who decided to make some of his own (unauthorised) modifications to the engine. The quality was not up to scratch, and the arrangement was quickly terminated." How do you tell if your VEGA is a "good 'un" ? Well, the Serial Numbers tell the story. Each size of the Harbone originals had a # starting off at 001, thus there is a VEGA 25 starting off at 001 and moving upwards (the 25 shown on the bottom row is Serial # 093), an 001 60 size and an 001 90 size. The engine along the top row is Serial # 5, which indicates it was made by John Harbone. "The less than perfect engines were numbered from 100 up, thus an engine with the number #169 would be one of the outside contractor's examples. The engine shown also has the detachable front housing, a feature of the earliest engines. Early engines ran best on 10% nitro fuel (for reliable idle) but the later engines ( the 50, 60, 1.20 and 1.80) were all intended to run on no nitro fuel, regardless of oil type. Full or part synthetic oil was found to be helpful in reducing the tendency for the exhaust valve to gum up and stick."
More here - http://modelenginenews.org/cardfile/vega30.html
Last edited by Twin Stack; Mar 04, 2017 at 07:07 PM.
Dec 03, 2014, 07:27 PM
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No - not glow. Not even vintage - just irresistible (isn't it Bill ?)
65 cc KOLM
KOLM Getriebemotoren (2 min 19 sec)
Dec 03, 2014, 09:51 PM
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williame3590's Avatar
Bob, you should here the 200cc inline 3.........sick!!!!
P-51 The Galloping Ghost @ Warbirds over Oberhausen (3 min 33 sec)



Bill
Dec 03, 2014, 09:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by williame3590
Bob, you should here the 200cc inline 3.........sick!!!! Bill
Oh Man - that's nearly as good as the real thing !
Dec 03, 2014, 10:20 PM
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YULON 30 - the first of the YULON's to appear in 1949
http://www.modelenginenews.org/ad/yulon.html
My own example on bottom row. These had a Bore / Stroke of 0.746 in. and 0.691 in., both these figures being reduced by 0.003 in. in the "Bee Hive" 29
Last edited by Twin Stack; Sep 08, 2018 at 11:19 PM.
Dec 03, 2014, 10:55 PM
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williame3590's Avatar
Not sure I want to trade Bob unless you have a 3 cylinder Kolm.

Bill
Dec 03, 2014, 11:10 PM
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williame3590's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twin Stack
Oh Man - that's nearly as good as the real thing !
Better Bob, we could all have one of these if we wanted.

Bill
Dec 03, 2014, 11:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by williame3590
Not sure I want to trade Bob unless you have a 3 cylinder Kolm. Bill
Bill, I have a couple of 29's, but it's the 30 that eludes me
Dec 03, 2014, 11:38 PM
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williame3590's Avatar
The one I have is the first I have ever seen Bob. It was in the bottom of a large box of engines I purchased.
Also mine was not near prestine. I had to re-shape the lugs and thrust washer, polish out the head and cylinder and then repaint after the ultrasonic bath. It turned out very nice but it was quite a bit of work.
If I find a 30... and I might, it's yours.

Bill
Dec 04, 2014, 02:19 AM
Registered User
Back on page 250, a viewer was asking about a strange Testors McCoy 049 that he owned. It had the black plastic crankcase, and a strange venturi on the side of the shaft housing. That mystery was solved in Post # 3756 page 251. The engine shown below (first photo) however, differs in having a die-cast metal crankcase, but more importantly it has what appears to be, rear induction as well as provision for the earlier mentioned front induction ! Very interesting engine in photo's #2 & #3, one of only about 6 built by Ladislav Davidovich, is made (mostly) from plastic !
(Quote) "This example has a black plastic crankcase (there were some white ones - see page 339, Report # 5080), clear plastic "see-through" backplate, and plastic connecting rod. The intake is aluminium with needle valve and body in brass/steel . The cylinder liner/piston and crankshaft are steel with a 4 bolt aluminium head . The exhaust stack and muffler both have copper sheet lining to protect from melting the plastic . Dunkin’s Book states that it was “reported the engine ran well”
Last edited by Twin Stack; Nov 03, 2015 at 10:09 PM.
Dec 04, 2014, 03:07 AM
Registered User
Oozing quality, a ROSSI 40 RIRE (see sellers ROSSI 15's also)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/ROSSI-40-RV-...item19f8237807


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