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Aug 17, 2010, 08:50 AM
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Question

Why is the Walkera 4#3 so unstable compared to other micro FP's?


Hi there,

Being the owner of a Walkera 4#3 (no sub-letters, 'a'/'b'), and seing the steady flights of Blade mSR and NE's Solo Pro, I begin to wonder why the 4#3 is so unstable. What are the differences causing this?
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Aug 17, 2010, 08:54 AM
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EQMOD's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by egholm
Hi there,

Being the owner of a Walkera 4#3 (no sub-letters, 'a'/'b'), and seing the steady flights of Blade mSR and NE's Solo Pro, I begin to wonder why the 4#3 is so unstable. What are the differences causing this?
Read about the 90 degree flybar hiller head (4#3) and the 45 degree flybar bell hiller (msr) and the 45 degree flybar bell head (solo). The hiller head is considered to be the most difficult to fly due to the inherent delay in controls.

Also 45 degree flybar heads are considered to be more stable than the 90 degree flybar heads.
Aug 17, 2010, 08:55 AM
Fan of just about anything RC
SoloProFan's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by egholm
Hi there,

Being the owner of a Walkera 4#3 (no sub-letters, 'a'/'b'), and seing the steady flights of Blade mSR and NE's Solo Pro, I begin to wonder why the 4#3 is so unstable. What are the differences causing this?
The MSR and SP have a 45 degree phase shift flybar, that automatically stabilizes the heli, making hands free hover possible. The 4#3 has the flybar at a 90 degree angle to the blades, right? So it won't stabilize itself.
Latest blog entry: For the love of the hobby!
Aug 17, 2010, 08:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by egholm
Hi there,

Being the owner of a Walkera 4#3 (no sub-letters, 'a'/'b'), and seing the steady flights of Blade mSR and NE's Solo Pro, I begin to wonder why the 4#3 is so unstable. What are the differences causing this?
Because the other helis you are comparing it to have 45 degree flybars/heads rather than the standard 90 degree setup like your 4#3 or any other CP heli.

The 45 degree head design dampens the controls and pulls the heli back to a level hover when you let of the sticks, hence this is why all coaxial trainer helis have this design as well. Any heli with a traditional head will continue in its last direction until a correction input is given (as you know with your 4#3!)

There is usually a sacrifice with the "self stabilizing" head designs such as poor FF performance as you are essentially fighting the helis desire to be level, and the heli will usually rock back and forth or porpoise when returning to level or forced into FF. This design doesnt always like to fly in straight line either and generally exhibits interactions such as moving off to one side at the same time you are trying to move forwards.

The exception to this is the Hirobo Quark which has its own unique 45 degree design. Its as stable and self leveling as a coax but flies just like any other non stabilizing heli when in FF. Its the best design on the market as far as stability/performance goes.

These self stabilizing helis such as the MSR sometimes trick new fliers into thinking they can fly a single rotor heli, and they can be quite surprised when they move up to a real single rotor and find out they cant fly it at all.
Last edited by Xrayted; Aug 17, 2010 at 09:11 AM.
Aug 17, 2010, 09:00 AM
Cranky old fart
Balr14's Avatar
In addition to what EQMOD said, the Hiller head design has no anti-roll geometry. So, Hiller head FP helis really like to roll a lot. The head design is simple and cost effective and works reasonably well in 300 or larger size helis. But, it scales down poorly. Walkera has never been good at figuring out that you can't simply change the scale (up or down) and expect performance to be the same.
Aug 17, 2010, 09:06 AM
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I wish I knew this before I bought my 4#3. But I learnt to fly it anyway.
Aug 17, 2010, 09:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 13BT
I wish I knew this before I bought my 4#3. But I learnt to fly it anyway.
That is a good thing. Micro helis with traditional heads are the hardest to learn to control and if you can fly one, you can fly anything. A 450 size feels like a dream and 500 size feels like it can hover itself after a micro
Aug 17, 2010, 09:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xrayted
Because the other helis you are comparing it to have 45 degree flybars/heads rather than the standard 90 degree setup like your 4#3 or any other CP heli.
Ohh!
And thanks to EQMOD, SoloPro and Xrayted for these (consistant and) precise answers!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Xrayted
These self stabilizing helis such as the MSR sometimes trick new fliers into thinking they can fly a single rotor heli, and they can be quite surprised when they move up to a real single rotor and find out they cant fly it at all.
Ah, I was beginning to wonder whether I should just abondon my 4#3 and jump into an mSR. But now I'm up for the fight (again, after having it shelved for a year) :-)

Thanks!
Aug 17, 2010, 09:28 AM
Cranky old fart
Balr14's Avatar
The 4#3A is considerably easier to fly (relatively speaking) and many people have upgraded their 4#3 with A parts.
Aug 17, 2010, 11:47 AM
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Air Vaca's Avatar
I really love my 4#3, but...
I don't think stability was a major consideration when this unit was designed. Simplicity and size...that's about it.

that being said, it is one of the best trainers around. When you get a handle of this guy, they'll all seem easy [almost boring]. a 4#3 can give you sweaty palms just hovering There's an undeniable thrill when it clicks and you think "What's so hard about that?" I guess it would be like your first bike being a unicycle
and as Bair stated, the "A" parts do make it "easier".

MHO

regards,
Bill
Aug 17, 2010, 11:50 AM
Registered User
i812's Avatar
You still get sweaty palms with it?
Aug 17, 2010, 11:53 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by egholm
Ohh!
And thanks to EQMOD, SoloPro and Xrayted for these (consistant and) precise answers!!



Ah, I was beginning to wonder whether I should just abondon my 4#3 and jump into an mSR. But now I'm up for the fight (again, after having it shelved for a year) :-)

Thanks!
I think the different 4#3s are a very good choice to start.

They are very durable and tough.

I have the 4#3b for more than a year and still enjoy practicing flying it.

As was said if you learn to fly this helicopter you will be able to fly any helicopter at least the same level.

Do not abandon it foe a CB-100, mSr or SP

If you are a beginner read Radd's School of flying. It is excellent.
Aug 17, 2010, 12:31 PM
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Air Vaca's Avatar
sweaty palms anymore, nah.
I do get a little twitch when I'm launching a new model for the first time.
Aug 17, 2010, 12:35 PM
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i812's Avatar
What makes A vs B better?

I've probably read, but I've read so much, it's all scrambled.

A = plastic and brushed?
Aug 17, 2010, 12:37 PM
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i812's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Air Vaca
sweaty palms anymore, nah.
...
How about a vid showing it raising hell in the living room?


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