Thread Tools
Jul 27, 2010, 02:48 PM
Registered User
Thread OP
Discussion

Electic and nitro prop difference?


So my LHS has two separate bins for props, one electric only, and the other for nitro. Is there any reason why you can't use a nitro prop on a electric plane? I'd assume a 9x6 prop is a 9x6 prop assuming the mounting hole is correct.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Jul 27, 2010, 02:59 PM
Glenn
wellington53's Avatar
Usually electric props are lighter for small planes, .40 size and up electric planes use nitro props.
Jul 27, 2010, 04:22 PM
Team AJ Aircraft / Team JR
Xpress..'s Avatar
There is no reason you cannot use a nitro prop on a glow plane, it's the other way around that you're going to have trouble with.

The problems though are you gotta prop accordingly. A 9x6E prop is going to be a lot thiner and lighter than a standard 9x6 prop, and will be easier for an electric motor to turn.


Quote:
Originally Posted by wellington53
Usually electric props are lighter for small planes, .40 size and up electric planes use nitro props.
False, there's still electric props for planes MUCH larger than .40. You can use whatever you would like to, as long as it's within amp draw limits, but for the most part, people opt for electric props.
Jul 27, 2010, 05:28 PM
Glenn
wellington53's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpress..






False, there's still electric props for planes MUCH larger than .40.
But there easy too break on a nose over though don't you think Xpress?
Jul 27, 2010, 06:10 PM
Registered User
Thrawn150's Avatar
I fly a 17 x 8E on my .60 p-47. Same prop 2 bad landing nose overs. What I do not like is the lack of 3 and 4 blade props for large electric.
Jul 27, 2010, 06:17 PM
Registered User
Ever stood behind the prop wash of a 20X18 at WOT? It's an experience.
Jul 27, 2010, 06:25 PM
Registered User
restlessswind's Avatar
slimer (slimey nitro) props are designed to turn 30,000+ RPM with lots of vibration. E-props are designed to turn at about 10,000 RPM or less and very little vibration. The e-prop design is to make the most efficiency of a propeller, whereas the slimer props are tough and stout for durability, but less efficient. APC E-props will edge grind away in record time if allowed to.
Last edited by restlessswind; Jul 27, 2010 at 06:33 PM.
Jul 28, 2010, 10:25 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by restlessswind
slimer (slimey nitro) props are designed to turn 30,000+ RPM with lots of vibration. E-props are designed to turn at about 10,000 RPM or less and very little vibration. The e-prop design is to make the most efficiency of a propeller, whereas the slimer props are tough and stout for durability, but less efficient. APC E-props will edge grind away in record time if allowed to.

Not completely true, at least not for APC props. Here is APC's recommendations for RPM tolerance. Notice the rpm limits are the same for both glow and electric.
http://www.apcprop.com/v/html/rpm_limits.html


As you noted I think the limiting factor is stresses caused by glow or gas motors is not present with electric which is why you can indeed use a "glow" prop on your electric motor just not the other way around.
Jul 28, 2010, 11:01 AM
Fill'er Up!
mattyhawk's Avatar
I believe the major issue is RPM, heat and vibration. Electric motors for the case of argument have no vibration or heat compared to fuel engines. Electric props have lower mass from thinner blade profiles and thinner prop hubs. By using an e-prop in the right situation reduces the amp draw from the motor. I have noticed heavy props on smaller electric motors generate more heat than an electric prop of the same size and diameter. Ultimately, you need to make sure you are using the right prop for the situation. If you are running a high power electric motors comparable to a nitro engine over a 40 size 2 stroke, I suggest you should consider using a fuel specific prop. Under that size of electric motor, go for e-props if they are available, as long as you stay under the rated RPM limits of the prop type.

Also, make sure to check out the link about from ACKopter. Very important for you to figure out what prop to use based on RPM.
Jul 28, 2010, 03:24 PM
Registered User
mattyhawk,
I'm very new to this entire game but what you state about using "glow" designed props for larger over 40 size electrics doesnt really make sense if you think about it. Why on earth would prop companies such as APC even make an E prop for a large electric if it wouldnt hold up (all the way to 27"diameter). In my particular case I'm using an electric motor that according to the manufacture is equivelant to a .60 2stroke or .90 4stroke, either way is certainly more powerfull than the .40. I've been using a APC thin electric 14x7 on an airframe over 7lbs and it really hauls that thing around (nearly unlimited verticle)and has been trouble free.

Basically what I'm saying is, if there is an electric prop suited for your model use it without worry so long as you dont exceed the recommended rpm, which is pretty hard to do with an electric motor anyway.
Jul 28, 2010, 04:11 PM
Team AJ Aircraft / Team JR
Xpress..'s Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by wellington53
But there easy too break on a nose over though don't you think Xpress?
You're supposed to land the plane on all 3 points of contact, not nose it over

I tell you what, if I break an electric prop from a nose-over, I will swap to glow props

(and i'm not saying that because I've never nosed over- landing properly shouldn't nose a model over, and even so, there's not a very big chance of breaking a prop)
Jul 28, 2010, 04:18 PM
Registered User
wait, props break from nose-overs? I mean yeah, theoretically it happens... but I've done plenty of nose-overs and poor landings and my props are still fine. In fact, the only one I ever broke was from hitting a tree.

As ACKopter says, I'd use an electric prop for an electric plane if there is an electric prop available.
Jul 28, 2010, 06:15 PM
Glenn
wellington53's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xpress..
You're supposed to land the plane on all 3 points of contact, not nose it over

I tell you what, if I break an electric prop from a nose-over, I will swap to glow props

(and i'm not saying that because I've never nosed over- landing properly shouldn't nose a model over, and even so, there's not a very big chance of breaking a prop)
Yeah I know, but beggars can't be choosers and our field even that it is cut short is very thick grass, to help, most of my warbirds have been been changed to larger wheels but it happens!
Jul 28, 2010, 06:19 PM
Bombs away! Err...landing
Ira NZ's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawkwings
wait, props break from nose-overs? I mean yeah, theoretically it happens... but I've done plenty of nose-overs and poor landings and my props are still fine.
There's not much time to kill the throttle between thinking you're taking off and realising you're nosing over.
Jul 28, 2010, 08:28 PM
Registered User
That's why you fly planes with greater than 1:1 thrust to weight ratios, so you have all that extra power to take off vertically if you need

Or, that's why you fly taildraggers.


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Discussion Prop size makes a huge difference DaveG99 Fuel Plane Talk 4 Jan 27, 2010 09:28 PM
Discussion difference between nitro gas glow cgage Beginner Training Area (Fuel) 3 Jan 26, 2010 10:38 PM
Which Nitro Fuel For My Buggy? Whats The Difference Between Nitro Fuel Grades? adcyork Off-Road Vehicles 4 Jul 09, 2009 08:43 PM
Difference between Stryker prop and ABC prop? Mattydiah Beginner Training Area (Aircraft-Electric) 1 Sep 11, 2004 04:01 PM
3 amp difference between APC prop and GWS prop jeff262 Electric Power Systems 1 Feb 08, 2004 10:49 PM