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Old Jun 28, 2010, 12:05 PM
frankolin42 is offline
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Plans for Sterling Flying Fool Kit S-12


Hello Control Liners, I have recently purchased a Sterling Flying Fool, Kit S-12, from E Bay, and I have drafted the entire kit to two separate blueprints, The kit only has instructions on how to build the model, so I drafted each piece of the kit to plans, if there are any scratch builders interested in building the old 34" wingspan classic Biplane, I will have CD's to ship out. Please note I will only sell the CD, and not rolled plans, to conserve on shipping cost. Also with a CD the modeler can take it to the print shop and blow it up to any size he or she wishes, this leaves the R/C community open to convert it, which I also plan to do.toodleums@gmail.com please feel free to contact Frank at this address.
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Old Jun 29, 2010, 07:45 AM
Pinecone is offline
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Will fly for food
How much? I would be interested in a CD.
Old Jun 29, 2010, 11:01 AM
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Me, too. I also have the original decals.

howell
Old Jun 29, 2010, 01:20 PM
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why not just send the files by email, for free? Or a smaller charge?

Once any plan exists in machine readable form, Its pretty much something you only sell ONCE :-)
Old Jul 01, 2010, 01:41 AM
Moonbeam Six is offline
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Servos can't have all the fun!
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I built a Sterling Flying Fool back in 1970. I put a lot of effort into making it look really good. Unfortunately, I was really disappointed with the way it flew. It seemed to want to stall at high speed when asked to turn tightly. When I got too demanding, the top wing ripped off, and the Flying Fool soon became splinters.

MB6
Old Jul 01, 2010, 07:15 AM
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Sterling's lovely piano packing crate wood, heavy


Built straight from the kits, a majority of Flying Fools were far too heavy for the small wing area. Top wings were easily lost, just as described, however, it was occasionally possible to run out the tank in level flight, depending on having enough recovery height after losing the wing.

I would point out that it would be a major kindness for anyone dealing with fullsize plans for such a model, to include details on how to improve the Fool's upper wing attachment, particularly regarding beefing up all aspects of the center py;on, particularly the fuselage attachment end.

There were many better-flying bipes that were also kitted with better wood, but Sterling kept that Fool of theirs in production (often using the dies long past the "die-crushed" point, before renewing them, too) for at least 40 years.

Kiwi
Last edited by The Kiwi; Jul 02, 2010 at 11:07 AM.
Old Jul 01, 2010, 07:34 AM
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Servos can't have all the fun!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Kiwi View Post
Built straight from the kits, a majority of Flying Fools were far too heavy for the small wing area. Top wings were easily lost, just as described, however, it was possible to run out the tank in level flight, depending on having enough recovery height after losing the wing.

Kiwi
Continued flight after shedding the top wing is impossible if the strut with the leadout guides also departs with the wing. However, it was a beautiful crash.

MB6
Old Jul 01, 2010, 08:02 AM
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It had been a very long time ago


The only Fool I saw survive actually lost its upper wing by hitting a light pole. Occasionally, Dick's Hobby Shop would invite CL fliers to use the parking lot behind the Terrill Hills Shopping Center for a funfly, but space between poles was tight.

We would use spray paint to mark a center circle, but you just didn't have much leeway wandering off of it, with 60' lines. I would guess it was about 1964 or so, and the upper wing had more span than the lower, so the pilot missed the pole with his lower wing.

I saw something similar in a balloon bust, when the balloon's stick was stronger than the glue joints (he almost hit the ground, he was so low -- his wheels probably almost touched), but as you pointed out, the struts needed to stay attached, and I can't recall how long that second one was able to keep going, it seems to me he zoomed on the lower wing, and immediately started sagging, and just kept losing flying speed, nose high, for maybe a lap.

Whether it ran out of altitude, or the line guide came loose, he broke his prop and had a free run with just the stubs left, but it didn't rev up too high or too long. Neither plane was damaged beyond repair in those two incidents.

But yes, I'd actually forgotten that the leadouts were in between the wings -- I personally have never had a CL bipe -- some FF rubber ones, and I vaguely recall another, bigger one, for Half-A FF (in this case, meaning Free Flight), similar to a Dakota, although not from Veco (I don't think it flew particularly well, but I was pretty inept at building when I was still trying Free Flight stuff, and few flew that well until on a special day, they got up high enough and grabbed big thermals and were quickly OOS -- twice).

Kiwi
Last edited by The Kiwi; Jul 02, 2010 at 07:04 AM.
Old Jul 01, 2010, 12:36 PM
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I flew a friends's FF and noticed that the pylon had come loose from taht silly 1/16 sheet over the tank. So when I built mine I expoxied some 1/4 sheet to the top of the tank, slotted it for a LONGER pylon, filled around the sides with block and had no trouble. Also braced the heck out of the landing gear bulkheads.

The most fun you could have with a FF was a "twibble" which was a fall-over-on-its-back loop produced with full UP. Then trying to prop-hang. Sometimes the ground got in the way.

Mine was the first airplane I did with MonoKote. Red wings with white stars, white body, blue tail with white stars. Fox .25.

Waaah. I want my youth back!

howell

The
Old Jul 03, 2010, 04:14 PM
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It was a FF that taught me what was meant by the term "die-crushed".
I inherited the kit from someone and quickly found that any part that fit was strictly accidental. Early in the construction phase I determined that this was intended as a static model and it is. Never flown and has collected hanger rash for many years.

I inherited another kit (probably from the same source), an Ambroid Stuka Stunt that had already had 2 owner/builders. Been many years - maybe someday I may finish it.
Old Jul 03, 2010, 04:51 PM
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Which was the fool? Buyer or model?


There were a lot of corny jokes at the Fool's expense back in the 1960s, such as the Unflyable Fool, and the owners were the Non-flying Fools, etc.

They were "cute" looking, but there actually were several much better-flying biplanes available in the 50s (no longer sure if that availability persisted into the 60s).

Kiwi
Old Jul 03, 2010, 07:05 PM
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I built the Sterling SE5a, I must say with my trusty ol' Fox 35 it flew great. I plumbed engine's exhaust into the scale (home made from brass) exhaust pipes. Really looked cool. I was only 15 at the time in the early 60s. I have some photos in storage that I cant get too right now because they are 100 miles away. Also, Our local news paper (Daily Signal in Bell, CA.)) put one of my pictures in the paper of me with my SE5a back in the day.
Old Jul 04, 2010, 12:47 PM
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Probably doesn't qualify, but I turned Sig's Fokker D-VII into a Nieuport 28 and had a great time with it. Even did vertical 8's (well, OK, the top was 30 degrees behind my head) on a Fox .35. Always wanted a Spad; there's a kit available from Brodak or somebody.

howell
Old Jul 04, 2010, 12:55 PM
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Black Hawk Models is the one


The Sig Fokker D-7 and the Spad are currently produced by Black Hawk. Since there isn't a Sopwith Camel (the one that Snoopy, of the Peanuts strips, preferred to daydream of flying against the red Baron), I've been thinking of using a Spad and moving the lower wing back, then modifying the wingtips, empennage, to match the Camel.

I've thought that I would use an OS Max LA 25 . . (of course, I already own enough kits that at 4-5 a year, I'd run out of years before I run out of kits).

Here's the Sig D7: http://www.blackhawkmodels.com/sigd7.html

And a slightly smaller one: http://www.blackhawkmodels.com/fokkerd7.html

Kiwi
Last edited by The Kiwi; Jul 04, 2010 at 08:41 PM.
Old Jul 04, 2010, 05:00 PM
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I also built one in the early seventies, with a silkspan and dope finish that was way too heavy. Never did get to fly it, but in recent years have wondered about converting one to RC. Anyone recall if the model uses a wingtip weight or an asymmetrical planform to keep the lines tight?


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