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Jun 16, 2011, 07:43 PM
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One million views - not people
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Jun 16, 2011, 08:27 PM
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ColinNZ's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Applehoney
One million views - not people
At least half of those views were ME !!!! .


colin.
Jun 17, 2011, 01:30 AM
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SrFalcon's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Model Mad
Sr. Falcon,

A higher resolution copy of Touchdown.

MM
Hi Guys

Thanks for the Touchdown Plan, brings back some good memories, I originally built it in 1970 and want to do it again. Since I now live in South Africa I guess I can't call it a "Touchdown", maybe I'll put a 10 on the vertical stab and call it a "Flyhalf"

Cheers

Sr. Falcon
Jun 17, 2011, 01:31 AM
I like real wooden aeroplanes!
Sundancer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by RFJ
That's correct George. I found my copy of the later version plan and it actually shows two wings - a 48" span "trainer" wing with no ailerons and a flat bottom section plus a 45" span "performance" wing with ailerons and a biconvex section. Personally I prefer the older all built up 60's version.

Just in passing, I seem to remember that we met briefly when you came across to Belfast about a hundred years ago. Us locals were most impressed by your ability to find lift at our field when we couldn't

Ray
Hi Ray. Yes, I have fond memories of my weekend visit to Belfast as a guest of NIMSA. I recall the lift was pretty damn good at the thermal field, it was even better from the top of "Big Collin" where the lads dragged me after a substantial lunch on the Saturday. About being impressed; well, you struck lucky, as the models I had with me (my first Foss Hi-Phase and original Telstar 100S) were, I think, the best two thermal soarers I ever had. I only fly electric now, getting too old for the athletic glider stuff. Nice to know you are still modelling, keep throwing 'em up!
Jun 17, 2011, 07:59 AM
Vertically Challenged...
Cody's Neighbour's Avatar
I've tried to make a tile print of this one but I think it's too low a resolution.

Does anyone have a higher res copy please?

Bert
Jun 17, 2011, 08:50 AM
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rchopper56's Avatar

Hawk f-11-c


Hawk F-11C by Sidney Michaels
Scale Control-Line
Wing Span: 22-5/8 to 22-3/4"
Air Trails Pictorial October, 1946

Gene
Jun 17, 2011, 09:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cody's Neighbour
I've tried to make a tile print of this one but I think it's too low a resolution.

Does anyone have a higher res copy please?

Bert
yes Aeromodeller march 1957 will post after 11pm tonight due to upload/download restrictions on my satellite broadband until 11pm to 7am
Jun 17, 2011, 01:36 PM
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An Old Friend Found Here!


Quote:
Originally Posted by rchopper56
Here is one from 1969 by Ed Sweeney, the R/C Nobler. A friend sent me the Top Flight plans for the Nobler today. I measured the wingspan to be 51.2". The Top Flight R/C Nobler is based on Ed's design. I therefore scaled up Ed's to match.
Gene
Hello, I was nostagically browsing around whilst thinking about one of my favourite aircraft, an R/C converted Nobler. When to my amazement I stumbled on the plan posted as a pdf here! Amazing and thank you! I bought mine second hand in Dubai in the early '80's. I had read an interesting article about pre-stressing, simply by threading some c/l trace around the wings, all around the leading edge tips and trailing edge (inboard of the flaps of course) and another across the top of the wing around underneath. Both tensioned up Spanish Windlass style and then covered over. Anyway I was flying around happily as I loved the coupled elevator flap and the ability to fly steadily as wished.

Then the club ace came up and asked if he could have a go, so I proudly handed him the TX. He flung my 'plane around a bit, then tried a bunt - aha, the positive control was fine but the negative control was far less. So full throttle he 'landed' the Nobler upside down in the desert sand. It didn't do much good to that nice long nose - but guess what? The wings stayed intact, even though the pre-stressing wire did snap.

I mended it but it was never the same and I passed it on when I left Dubai. So now, 30 years later, having had quite a break from flying I am going to scale the plans up to full size and set about re-building one of my favourite aircraft!

I cannot believe my good luck! Many thanks (I'm in the UK btw, Lincolnshire, bomber country)
Jun 17, 2011, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GrahamFP
Hello, I was nostagically browsing around whilst thinking about one of my favourite aircraft, an R/C converted Nobler. When to my amazement I stumbled on the plan posted as a pdf here! Amazing and thank you! I bought mine second hand in Dubai in the early '80's. I had read an interesting article about pre-stressing, simply by threading some c/l trace around the wings, all around the leading edge tips and trailing edge (inboard of the flaps of course) and another across the top of the wing around underneath. Both tensioned up Spanish Windlass style and then covered over. Anyway I was flying around happily as I loved the coupled elevator flap and the ability to fly steadily as wished.

Then the club ace came up and asked if he could have a go, so I proudly handed him the TX. He flung my 'plane around a bit, then tried a bunt - aha, the positive control was fine but the negative control was far less. So full throttle he 'landed' the Nobler upside down in the desert sand. It didn't do much good to that nice long nose - but guess what? The wings stayed intact, even though the pre-stressing wire did snap.

I mended it but it was never the same and I passed it on when I left Dubai. So now, 30 years later, having had quite a break from flying I am going to scale the plans up to full size and set about re-building one of my favourite aircraft!

I cannot believe my good luck! Many thanks (I'm in the UK btw, Lincolnshire, bomber country)
Then you should also look here. It has the original build article with it.
http://www.outerzone.co.uk/plan_details.asp?ID=21
Jun 17, 2011, 03:35 PM
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rchopper56's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cody's Neighbour
I've tried to make a tile print of this one but I think it's too low a resolution.

Does anyone have a higher res copy please?

Bert
Does this help? Should be full size based on the 1-1/2" wheel. I simply took your JPG and enlarged it using PhotoShop. It's likely not better than what you had but I thought that it was worth a try.
Gene
Jun 17, 2011, 04:26 PM
Registered User

as promised earlier


The Dunne tailess from Aeromodeller March 1957 plus the other two plans in that issue.

Dunne Tailess 37.5" span FF virtually crashproof biplane tailess.

Sopwith Strutter 48" span near scale C/L stunt

Duellist 32.75" span C/L combat winner of the 1956 international combat event.
Last edited by aeromeddeler; Jun 17, 2011 at 04:34 PM.
Jun 17, 2011, 10:49 PM
AMA 667982 KG7NKY
starcad's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by planeman
I am going to expand on this for those who are trying to work in Photoshop.

The “Posterize” feature in Photoshop has some limitations but they can be overcome with a few 'tricks”.

  1. At lower resolutions “Posterize” often leaves plan lines with fine “jaggies” as I call them – the lines are jagged. To overcome this, raise the resolution to 900 or even 1,200 DPI (dots per inch) before performing the posterization.
  2. Posterization does not work well with most photographs. To deal with this, copy the photograph while in high resolution and do the following work in a separate new canvas.
    1. a. Adjust Brightness and Contrast of the photo if necessary.
      b. Change the Mode (Image - Mode) to Bitmap – halftone screen (if presently in a color mode you will have to change to grayscale before you can change to bitmap). Keep the Bitmap Output in window the same as the resolution you are working in. Now hit the O.K button.
      c. You have now converted the photo to a high resolution halftone which means you have broken the photo up into tiny dots (a bitmap) that are the same resolution as the plan you have been working on.
  3. Leave the photo and return to the plan. At this point we are almost ready to finalize the plan before converting it to a .PDF. The objective at this point is to retain a high resolution plan with no jagged lines but get rid of all unneeded file information that makes for a large file size. As you have a plan that is solid black and solid white with no gray tones in between, you want to get rid of any grayscale information and go to a bitmap of pure black and white. Bitmaps are known to produce jagged lines, but this is not necessarily so if done correctly.
    After the plan has been posterized in high resolution, convert it to a special form of bitmap called “50% Threshold”. “50% Threshold” forces all tones of gray above 50% to a pure black and all tones of gray below 50% to a pure white, eliminating all tones of gray. You have already done this using Posterize (which is a cleaner way of doing this) but with Posterize the file still retains all of the unnecessary elements needed to make up gray tones. You want to eliminate these unnecessary elements and that is what “50% Threshold” does.
    To convert to 50% Threshold, go to Image – Mode – Bitmap and select 50% Threshold in the little window and hit O.K. You now have a bitmap plan with no grayscale information in the file.
  4. Back to the Photo. Go back to the photo and copy the photo. Then go to the plan and paste the photo into the plan. Be careful to position the photo correctly in the plan as when you finish the photo will not be on a separate layer as it is in grayscale or color mode. It will be in the plan itself. There are no layers in bitmap mode.
  5. Everything in your plan including the photo is now in high resolution bitmap mode. This very high resolution helps keep all lines very smooth but also would make for a large file. What I have found is this high resolution can be lowered to 300 DPI while in bitmap mode and the lines retain their smoothness. So at this point reduce the resolution to 300 DPI and save the file.
  6. Now open the file in Adobe Acrobat and convert the file to a .PDF file. For those of you who don't know this, Adobe Acrobat converts all files to a special vector file, a file whose image is defined by mathematical calculations and not dots. Two advantages to us plan users are: (1) .PDF images can be enlarged/reduced almost indefinitely without losing resolution, and (2) a line-smoothing algorithm is built into the program to smooth out jagged lines. In addition, Acrobat compresses files. I have found that using the above “50% Threshold” method I can usually get a high resolution 300 dpi black and white plan of around 40” x 60” in size into a .PDF file of under 1 megabyte.
Good luck!
Planeman
P.S. I am trying to get some work done in my shop so I am presently not as attentive to this thread as I could be. I still check in daily but I am not posting as often. Somehow we need 48 hour days and to live much longer lives to get everything we want to do done.

Rufus, one of these days I just want to spend a weekend with you and try to digest as much as I can in as that little time would afford. Thanks that helps a lot.
Jun 18, 2011, 12:45 AM
Registered User
Well, I just went through my RC files, separated approximately 239 planes based roughly on the OT and Vintage definition. Then I went through titling the files that were in individuual folders. Just finished the step of sizing. That is going through all 230 files and moving the files that had one or more pages 3.0 Mb or larger into another category, for future reduction. This file presently has 51 planes in it. For some, all I have to do is just do a resize on a text page, or a crop on a plan page to get the page below the 3.0 MB size. Some pages, however are close to 5.0 Mb because of background shading. I think I have a utility that will let me clean up the shadows without any damage to lines.

Just from a quick perusal of my files, I probably have over 1000 rubber power models to process. I have a large quantity of Comet plans I downloaded from that Russian site among the thousand, if they are acceptable for this thread. The saving grace on these rubber model plans is that many or them, maybe (I hope) up to 1/3 are already PDF.
Jun 18, 2011, 01:48 AM
Vertically Challenged...
Cody's Neighbour's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by rchopper56
Does this help? Should be full size based on the 1-1/2" wheel. I simply took your JPG and enlarged it using PhotoShop. It's likely not better than what you had but I thought that it was worth a try.
Gene
Thanks for your help, it's appreciated

Bert
Jun 18, 2011, 01:51 AM
Vertically Challenged...
Cody's Neighbour's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by aeromeddeler
The Dunne tailess from Aeromodeller March 1957 plus the other two plans in that issue.

Dunne Tailess 37.5" span FF virtually crashproof biplane tailess.

Sopwith Strutter 48" span near scale C/L stunt

Duellist 32.75" span C/L combat winner of the 1956 international combat event.

Thank you so much - I really appreciate your work on this thread.

Bert


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