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Mar 20, 2010, 07:46 PM
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Walt Mooney Boston Revere Speedster build


Besides wanting to build Guillows, Sterling, Comet and Peck kits, I also want to build some old planes from when I was younger. My uncle built this plane years before I started flying. Took a beating and needed a re-cover, so for my first Bostonian contest, he gave me this plane to cover. Now I get to build my own to how I remember it. I built the first side directly over the plans with Elmer's Glue All. Nothing fancy just straight pins to hold everything straight. When dried I began the second side, just slip the first under the wax paper and begin building the second directly on top of the first with the wax paper in between. The tail surfaces are laminated balsa, so I stripped lengths of 1/32 x 1/16 balsa. Then soaked in water/Ammonia mixture for over 1 hour. I used pins as a template,.....I know I am lazy. While the balsa was soaking, I started on the ribs. I striped 1/32 balsa a little larger than the rib shown on the plans. I then stack together and pin. Then sand the front and back perfectly square. Then apply some glue to the rear and front to hold the ribs together while I sand. I sand a nice rectangular box and glue a template of the rib on the stack. Since this is a Bostonian, you can just eye ball the rib shape. I then proceed to sand the stack to the perfect shape. Then lastly, I file a notch for the stringer. Once the strips were nice a pliable, I glued them together and began bending around the pin templates. I will allow this to dry overnight. Well I think that is it for 3 1/2 hours of building time today.










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Mar 21, 2010, 08:34 AM
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Gluehand's Avatar
It's funny....just before reading this post, I spent a while studying the plan of Walt Mooney's "Boston Tea Partly", a design not unlike BRS....

A very nice build, Scigs, which I will follow with great interest...and I also look forward to a flight report...

Do you pre-taughten the tissue for this kind of model..?



Mar 21, 2010, 11:20 AM
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Anytime I use Esaki, I pre shrink it, this guarantees a warp free covering and prevents the sag look over time.
Mar 25, 2010, 12:17 PM
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I boxed up the fuselage using pins and good ole eye site to make sure everything is straight. Used hard 1/32 sheet balsa for the formers and flexible 1/32 sheet balsa for the cowling. I place tracing paper on top of the formers and do a rough trace for the pattern. Then I cut out the balsa cowling and soak it in water/ammonia. After 1 to 2 hours, I place the cowling on the formers and keep in place with tape. When dry the cowling stays in perfect shape. Now I can trim the cowling for a perfect fit and glue with Elmers Glue all. You can see using pins for a template produced pretty good laminated tips. The landing gear wire is already formed and will be glued in today. Also I will sand everything and start on the nose block and wheel pants.










Mar 25, 2010, 09:07 PM
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All done with the frames, just needs a final sanding and I can begin covering. Will pre shrink Orange Esaki tissue on a picture frame to prevent warps. So far as shown she weighs 10 grams.






Mar 25, 2010, 09:30 PM
Pedro Salomón
harrier81's Avatar
Amazing work as allways ! congrats
Apr 09, 2010, 05:54 PM
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I finished my Bostonian today and not too bad for an orange bird. The last Boston Speedster I had flew away :'( I covered with pre shrunk orange Esaki tissue attached with 50/50 glue water. I then brushed on 2 coats of clear Dope. As shown the weight is 12.25 grams, a little too light for the West Coast Bostonian rules, but after rubber and some weight, I think she will be were she needs to be. I will post flight pictures when I make out to the field again. Also I will post the plans for this build.






Apr 11, 2010, 01:19 AM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Scigs, that is a great job you did in this Mooney design.

Also you're now officially SO FAR beyond lowering yourself to build a Guillows kit that it would be a sacrilage to even suggest such a thing. At least it would be if you want to build from a stock Guillow's KIT. But if you choose to take on a set of Guillows plans and adapt and build a proper model that is actually capable of flight then that's a different story.....
Apr 11, 2010, 02:50 PM
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Yea I know, but they bring back such good memories and they are easy to build. I am working on an old L4 Sterling kit right now, hope it is able to drop the leaflets when its done.
Apr 12, 2010, 10:32 PM
B for Bruce
BMatthews's Avatar
Scale size leaflets I'm hoping. Or else it's going to get mighty crowded inside that fuselage....

While I'm not a big fan of the Guillows stuff there are a few notable exceptions. Their Fairchild 24 is actually a very good design. Almost TOO minimal in fact. If not for the short nose it would be a true delight. There are a few other such in their lineup as well. But the old half bulkhead and keel models are all pretty sad and require so much modifying to fly well that you may as well start from scratch.


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