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Old Feb 15, 2010, 04:30 PM
Sprydle is offline
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Against it with you
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A 223 foot wing, but it's not a on a 'plane


The America's Cup was just won by a very innovative trimaran using a 223 ft wing as the mainsail.

Very, very impressive especially when up on just one hull.
BMW Oracle BOR 90 sailing in Mexico, November 20 '09 (0 min 54 sec)
Old Feb 15, 2010, 11:09 PM
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Go get them Meg!
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Larry Ellison, hard at work.
Old Feb 15, 2010, 11:41 PM
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I got too many hobbies!
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Our ranger can do that!
Old Feb 16, 2010, 12:07 AM
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fix-it-up chappie
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I'm kind of shocked. I thought the AC rules were specific to monohulls. Pretty sweet video when it gets up on one pontoon. The stateliest cat I ever seen.
Old Feb 16, 2010, 01:42 AM
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Originally Posted by tolladay View Post
I thought the AC rules were pecific to monohulls.
It's complicated. From memory; the deed of gift states only the maximum waterlength. The defender is supposed to issue detailed design rules for the next AC races. With the 33rd AC the defender (Alinghi) tried to dictate rules that were inherently in it's favor. A long court battle ensued, with the result that, instead of the traditional monohull design, and round robbin races to decide who can challenge the defender, a best-out-of-three series was held with the only design rule a 90ft waterline.
Old Feb 16, 2010, 01:54 AM
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Go get them Meg!
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There is a formula for AC sailboats that includes hull length, displacement (volume rather than weight), and sail area, IIRC.
Old Feb 16, 2010, 02:51 AM
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Originally Posted by lrsudog View Post
There is a formula for AC sailboats that includes hull length, displacement (volume rather than weight), and sail area, IIRC.
Displacement is always quoted in units of weight for boat building purposes. Th AC seems nowadays to be always preceeded and followed by lengthy litigation; Britania may rule the waves but the USA waves the rules
Old Feb 16, 2010, 03:09 AM
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The original Flying Pigs Sqd.
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Originally Posted by martin richards View Post
Britania may rule the waves but the USA waves the rules
It seemed more like the Swiss defender trying to wave the rules...
(or at least bend them in their favor)
Old Feb 16, 2010, 05:39 AM
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Impressive - until that is it pitches forward and the hulls flip it - seen that - ouch!
Old Feb 17, 2010, 01:16 PM
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Go get them Meg!
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Originally Posted by martin richards View Post
Displacement is always quoted in units of weight for boat building purposes. Th AC seems nowadays to be always preceeded and followed by lengthy litigation; Britania may rule the waves but the USA waves the rules

Not in this case, again IIRC. The displacement value in the formula was in cubic meters, rather than weight, at least last time I read up on IAC rules.

Of course, there have been many rule changes over the years, including formula changes, so...
Old Feb 17, 2010, 02:33 PM
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Random Pic #23982
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The cup has lost it's charm.
Old Feb 17, 2010, 03:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Indiana_Geoff View Post
The cup has lost it's charm.
That's exactly what I was thinking.
Old Feb 18, 2010, 06:17 PM
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The design rule for the IACC (International America's Cup Class) was agreed upon by the defenders when the cup went to San Diego for the 1992 cup. If no rules are agreed upon the Cup can be challenged per the Deed of Gift or the rules stated in the Deed of ownership of the Cup. The New York State Supreme Court decides all legal cases and challenges relating to the Cup. New Zealand in 1988 used the Deed of Gift Challenge which was then raced for by a Catameran sailed by Dennis Connor for the US, then holder of the Cup and a 100+ foot monohull sailed by New Zealand. The Catameran predicatly easily won. There was a court battle at that time that determined that the rules in the Cup's Deed did not exclude catamerans or any other type of boat since it only specifices 90 foot waterline. In a deed of gift match, the defender is inherently favored since the challenger must give details of their boat design to the defender at the time the challenge is issued and the defender can then go off and design their boat to beat whatever the challenger said they will be using. In the early days of the Cup, the challenger was also required to sail their boat to the challenge location from where the boat was built in their home country. That gave the US Defenders a huge advantage since they could design boats around sailing in coastal waters when the challengers had to build something to do an ocean crossing.

Prior to 1992 the cup was sailed in by boats built to the 12 meter design rule. Prior to that it was sailed by the J-Class boats. When a class or design rule is in effect for the cup match it's because the challengers and defenders have agreed to use it. The 12 meter class boats were signifcantly smaller then 90 feet water line. The 12 meter boats were orginally agreed to when the New York Yacht Club located in Newport RI had the Cup. Newport is a relatively high wind location. When it went to Freemantle Australia it was still a relatively high wind location so they stayed with the 12 meter. When the Cup came back to San Diego, it is a low wind location, so a new boat class was created better suited to a low wind venue which is where the IACC class came in. The IACC design rule basically is a formula where the length, beam, draft (depth) displacement and sail area, and mast height must add up to a value. If you look at the boats in 1992, the first year the rule was used there was a lot of variation most notable in beam, the narrower boats were faster, and by the last use of IACC boats, all the boats were very close in dimension.
Old Feb 18, 2010, 06:21 PM
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I absolutely love the old J-class boats.
Great site here - http://www.jclassyachts.com/index.html


Old Feb 18, 2010, 06:46 PM
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During college I worked for a summer as a sailing instructor in Newport RI, in 1997. The J-Boat Shamrock was moored there and was sailing around frequently. It docked at the place I worked one afternoon and although we couldn't actually get on it we got a nice look from a couple feet away on the dock. There were several 12 meters sailing around still being raced there.


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