Thread Tools
Nov 11, 2009, 05:57 AM
KISS_KeepItSimpleStupid
philkiteflyer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoarScale2
I can add some comments here. Read on for Australia and possibly NZ

In Australia, the Douglas-Fir is known as Oregon timber and is generally imported. This may be true of New Zealand also but I p don't know this for sure.
Thanks for that, I know 'Oregon' here in NZ, it is one of the 'untreated' structural timbers used here (manly for large roof joints in open framed (farm) sheds.
The only query I have is that the timber seems to have big differences in hardness between the growth rings and it is hard to get a smooth finish.

I will have to go and check out the local timber yards to see what is available.

Cheers SoarScale2, good info.
Phillip C
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Nov 11, 2009, 12:20 PM
SoarScale
Quote:
The only query I have is that the timber seems to have big differences in hardness between the growth rings and it is hard to get a smooth finish.
This is, in general, no different than Sitka Spruce assuming you have done due dilligence in comparitive selection. The comment I made earlier about Sitka being increasingly difficult to obtain in aviation quality grades is partly due to the same items you just pointed out (although in big part it is due to other reasons). The trick is to find straight grained, and although I did not point this out earlier, tight grained. The tighter the grain, the more consistent the properties are across the span.

By "untreated" I assume you mean not treated with the anti-rot pressure treating. You don't want wood treated this way but a better selection as I noted before is the Kiln dried wood. Not sure if you can get that in NZ or not. It's available here in the US and is the better selection for our uses.

As with most Firs, they are a relatively fast growing wood and therefore growth rings are wider than many other hardwoods. This is the natural state of the Douglas-Fir yet it still has the sought after properties for the aviation industry!

Oh, and regarding cutting, this is where Fred's comments come into play regarding blade type when ripping. Refer back to him on this.
Nov 11, 2009, 03:49 PM
KISS_KeepItSimpleStupid
philkiteflyer's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoarScale2
By "untreated" I assume you mean not treated with the anti-rot pressure treating. You don't want wood treated this way but a better selection as I noted before is the Kiln dried wood. Not sure if you can get that in NZ or not. It's available here in the US and is the better selection for our uses.
Correct, we have a new building regs that state the ALL building timber is to be rot & insect treated. Also, most of our timber is kiln dried in NZ, especially down here in the south, cos its not a very 'Tropical' climate .

As for cutting, I'll just to give it try to see how my wee table saw works, I think it's a 6" or 8" blade I inherited from my Grandfather, ideal for small width cutting.

Phillip C
Nov 11, 2009, 09:14 PM
Registered User
Bill L's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred China
Bill

In photo no 1 the forward card template from cockpit to the nose I assume will be transferred to plywood which you will glue to the longeron on the top side. What are you planning on gluing the bottom edge to. Also if you make that one panel you now have a compound curve with which I think you are going to have great difficulty. You say you have added 3/16 balsa to the side of each former for extra gluing area. That's what I do however When the fuselage starts to curve near the nose I use a seperate panel between each former. The separate panel would cover the area between each former from side longeron to the keel. I think that's the way the full size was built. You can put in a cross brace between the formers at the keel so you have something to glue the bottom edge of the panel against. I realize that you will not get a perfectly symmetrical fuselage near the nose but your not building a glass ship.
I hope you don't mind these suggestions. The video of the varnished Kirby Kite on this page shows what I mean.
I also just realised that maybe you are going the Bondo route so I'll shut up and go away.
Fred
Fred,

Thank you for the tips, I will be painting the fuse bit i still want the fuse as clean as possible to minimize the use of Bondo.

Feel free to comment I am sure if it does not help me it will help the others who have purchased short kits recently, I look forward to your future guidance

B
Dec 04, 2009, 08:19 PM
Registered User
The man with the brown socks came by today. I'm very happy to have the kit even though the bulk of the work can't start until I get moved around summer time. I have a feeling I will be building some tail feathers and ailerons before then.

Need some time to build a tug too. I'm pretty much settled on the AMR Trainer 50 unless one of you has a better recommendation in that price range. The tug will be electric so I can use it at the Austin Silent Flier field. Here's a link to it in action.

HKM ASW 28 7 2m (2 min 44 sec)
Dec 04, 2009, 09:30 PM
Nothing like a good WOODIE!
cooper998's Avatar
edfmaniac,
Thats my AMR Trainer 50 hauling up lens 40+lb asw. An excellent choice in tugs if you ask me, very stable and with the right motor more than capable. I suggest adding as much lightening holes as possible, mine came out at 24lbs rtf.

Tony
Dec 04, 2009, 09:51 PM
Registered User
The Amr is a great tow plane, Mine came in around 30 lbs with the flaps that Tony added
I am in the process of putting a DLE 111 on the plane
I flew it with a Neu Bam motor and 12 cells
Dec 04, 2009, 11:57 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by cooper998
edfmaniac,
Thats my AMR Trainer 50 hauling up lens 40+lb asw. An excellent choice in tugs if you ask me, very stable and with the right motor more than capable. I suggest adding as much lightening holes as possible, mine came out at 24lbs rtf.

Tony
Nice! Thanks for the tip. What motors would you recommend for someone on a budget. I know you get what you pay for but thought you might know of some affordable motors that people have had good luck with. Rimfire, Eflite etc...
Dec 05, 2009, 12:43 AM
TEAM GORGEOUS
SZD16's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by edfmaniac
I'm pretty much settled on the AMR Trainer 50 unless one of you has a better recommendation in that price range.
If you plan to get one...get it now! I was planning to get one back in the summer and put it off and the price climbed from $275 to the current price of $375 which made me rethink my plans and I rebuilt our current tug rather then replace it with the AMR.
Dec 05, 2009, 10:35 PM
Registered User
Anyone know of a source of info on making the type of molded/laminated spar that this kit requires. I figure keeping the wood in the right position while curing won't be that hard to figure out but I assume there are some tricks to get the most stable and durable result. Things that come to mind are shaping each ply with steam before laminating together to reduce internal stresses and maybe throwing a thin layer of glass or some other composite in between plies. What's the best adhesive to use and so on? Thanks
Dec 06, 2009, 04:05 AM
Registered User
edfmaniac - that system worked for me on my Fafnir. I used carbon tows for the added strength between the layers of wood.
Dec 06, 2009, 02:41 PM
Registered User
Bill L's Avatar
Thread OP
I am not that far yet, but it doesn't seem complicated, when I get there I will post some pics.

I am almost ready to join my fuse halves right now, and I have cut the plywood for the tail surfaces

B
Dec 07, 2009, 08:41 PM
Registered User
rcmorrow's Avatar
My kit has arrived today...........starting the review of the plans and parts to set up a wood list and also prep my shop to mill the spars and other parts needed.

Helps to be a woodworker and have a full shop for building projects like this !
Dec 07, 2009, 08:44 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcmorrow
My kit has arrived today...........starting the review of the plans and parts to set up a wood list and also prep my shop to mill the spars and other parts needed.

Helps to be a woodworker and have a full shop for building projects like this !
Hey Bob The ? is will it be ready for SKSS or Salem
Dec 07, 2009, 09:11 PM
Registered User
rcmorrow's Avatar
Just unpacked the box of wood...........took me 1/2 an hour just to get the packing material out so I could see the wood parts.

Beautifully done ! The laser cutting and wood selection is extremely high quality !

Have to roll out the plans and take a look at them in detail. but I think it would be safe to say this one will take a bit of time to put together.

I was fortunate with my DG-600 that it is an all composite ship with little build other than equipment install.........this one (the Petrel) will definately require all my years of building skills, but it shouldn't be too hard, just some patience in the process.

I have to guess 6-12 months for the build (beginning to end), balancing the build with my work and family here (my wife and our two young children, 3 and 5 that are wonderful !).

I'll start a build log when I get the project underway in ernest here.


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sold Petrel 1/3 scale kit from Laser Flight, NIB sekollera Aircraft - Sailplanes (FS/W) 4 Sep 29, 2008 05:35 AM
New Brushless motor - 1/3 scale model? allan Electric Plane Talk 12 Jan 10, 2008 07:37 AM
R/C Paraglider Huge 1/3 scale camera platform on EBAY countmonk Aircraft - Electric - Airplanes (FS/W) 0 Nov 11, 2002 07:29 PM
Yippee! R/C Paraglider Huge 1/3 Scale Camera Platform countmonk Aircraft - Electric - Helis (FS/W) 0 Nov 11, 2002 09:12 AM
ModelTech 1/3 Scale Cub mkirsch1 Sport Planes 2 Dec 16, 2001 05:24 PM