Thread Tools
Oct 15, 2009, 05:38 PM
Ken's CAD Models
dz1sfb's Avatar
Thread OP
Discussion

CAD Plans checklist


It probably has been discussed here before, but I have not spent much time in the builders workshop section of RCGroups.

Has anyone developed a plans design checklist for developing plans. I have done many plans, for others as well as myself. Sometimes I get so far into it that I get a little lost, primarily when it comes to annotation. That is the part I like least.

I am a TurboCAD Pro user, and generally develop 3D math data prior to setting up the drafting side of the project. I am even thinking about template files for the drafting side that are tailored to model aircraft.

Appreciate any input or direction,
Ken
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Oct 16, 2009, 02:40 AM
Balsa dust maker
plane_tech's Avatar
As far as notes go, I generally only put enough on the drawing to remind me of certain key points. Critical grain directions, material if different from balsa, basic dims of the certain parts. Other than that, I have a separate spreadsheet in Excel with all of my notes, design ideas, what I am designing for, power plant, etc. But that is just me. I am normally the only one to see the plans, so take it for what its worth.
Oct 16, 2009, 03:35 AM
Registered User
vintage1's Avatar
Oh dear. I design kits, very laser cut kits, and EVERYTHING has to go in, including an instruction manual.

A lifetime of cockups by subcontractors who always guess exactly WRONG if it doesn't clearly state..and still do when it does, but at least they pay if you say 'It says here RADIUS not DIAMETER!!"..develops a habit of examining a plane for ANY ambiguity and annotating it.

And, of course, my very first job as a 'prentice had the golden rule pinned up in the toilets..with a neat little cartoon that I wont reproduce in a family friendly forum 'The job's not done till the paper work is done'
Oct 16, 2009, 03:54 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by vintage1
A lifetime of cockups by subcontractors who always guess exactly WRONG if it doesn't clearly state...develops a habit of examining a plane for ANY ambiguity and annotating it.
Thank you! Being at the other end of the manufacturing chain, I can't tell you how much I appreciate that. Keep up the good work. In spite of a decade of practice I still suck at reading the customer's mind.
Oct 16, 2009, 09:19 AM
Registered User
I have done about sixty model A/C plans now, varying in content from one sheet to seven for the same airplane. Took a look up close at one of your examples shown above, and only thing I could come up with was a LACK of information. Can't build anything off of that. Right now is of the quality of a plan obtained for free at one of those airplane web sites. You have a long way to go yet. Take me three months, per plan, how can you do such in the time noted is not well explained.

I use Autycad here, connecting in to my own plotter too. Having my own plotter at home saves a lot of time, as it eliminates the need for traveling to get out one progress plot. Autocad has a very quick way add a note or a leader with note to the plan. Lottsa web-sites over the internet to describe how to do this. Vary the text style, look here and there, what is size of this wood (a note should say), know who makes the glow engine? the servo? the hinge or landing gear unit then let others know via note who makes it, is the rib at center of wing different that one just over here due to...

You have NUMEROUS notes to go yet. Do not assume that the future builder can figure out the size to a part by measuring of your plan (creation), state so. "All ribs of 3/32 Balsa, unless noted otherwise". Once near completion, you will find that you ought to have blown another month, and still do not have a completed plan.

Run an area (flat-wise) and include a note there too. I haven't found too many plans that measure close to what you will find. Usually they are a bit over, same as for wingspan notations. Box says 66 inches, but plan actually measures a bit over 64 inches. Add in correct notations.

It isn't easy, but CAD was designed for revisions, and you then need to make a couple of prototypes of your model, then revise the plan same as done at your bench, until it gets finalized, and flyable as intended. Then, you can plot out the final-final plan and say.....

Wm.
Oct 16, 2009, 11:01 AM
Balsa dust maker
plane_tech's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by coosbaylumber
I have done about sixty model A/C plans now, varying in content from one sheet to seven for the same airplane. Took a look up close at one of your examples shown above, and only thing I could come up with was a LACK of information. Can't build anything off of that. Right now is of the quality of a plan obtained for free at one of those airplane web sites. You have a long way to go yet. Take me three months, per plan, how can you do such in the time noted is not well explained.

Wm.

I can draw fast, I have a degree in drafting and I have been doing it for about 10 years. The lack of information comes from the fact that I designed it, I am drawing it, and I am building it. No one else sees the plans besides me. I know what is what. IF I was to draw plans for someone else, then yes, every possible note would be on the plans as needed, and again in the notes section to make sure that the details were crystal clear.
Just for an example, here is another one of mine... from years ago.
Oct 16, 2009, 11:19 AM
Ken's CAD Models
dz1sfb's Avatar
Thread OP

Example


Here is one of my plans. Usually 2 sheets, one for general arraingement, and the other for parts patterns.

Mind you, I am producing for others to be able to use.

Ken
Oct 16, 2009, 07:36 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by plane_tech
I can draw fast, I have a degree in drafting and I have been doing it for about 10 years. The lack of information comes from the fact that I designed it, I am drawing it, and I am building it. No one else sees the plans besides me. I know what is what. IF I was to draw plans for someone else, then yes, every possible note would be on the plans as needed, and again in the notes section to make sure that the details were crystal clear.

Just for an example, here is another one of mine... from years ago.

Well, I have not been doing model aircraft plans as long as you have, for only started the back in 1979 using a Cogo system. That was a few years before the basic home computor the IBM 8086 came on to the scene. Took everyone then a long time to do it as such. Sure wasn't as fast as you mentioned. Nor as you mentioned do I have a "degree" in anything, nope, for you got me there as it wasn't required in the era that I mailed off my $100 for testing. But you can find my name listed amoung the active on the registration list at State Board of Professional Engineers, and Land Surveyors.

Our first test on any plan that I created was to ask some complete novice if they can build from the plan or was it just a bunch of lines. You can go to my web-site (http://www.mybloo.com/coosbay/laser/laser.html) and download an old plan that I did in middle 1990's which is set up for a pen plotter. Although never marketed, the style shown by the plan is more over what is required of model builder's in the era. It has also been stolen and reproduced at a from a few of the European fee web-sites.


Wm.
Oct 17, 2009, 02:51 AM
Balsa dust maker
plane_tech's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by coosbaylumber
Well, I have not been doing model aircraft plans as long as you have, for only started the back in 1979 using a Cogo system. That was a few years before the basic home computor the IBM 8086 came on to the scene. Took everyone then a long time to do it as such. Sure wasn't as fast as you mentioned. Nor as you mentioned do I have a "degree" in anything, nope, for you got me there as it wasn't required in the era that I mailed off my $100 for testing. But you can find my name listed amoung the active on the registration list at State Board of Professional Engineers, and Land Surveyors.

Our first test on any plan that I created was to ask some complete novice if they can build from the plan or was it just a bunch of lines. You can go to my web-site (http://www.mybloo.com/coosbay/laser/laser.html) and download an old plan that I did in middle 1990's which is set up for a pen plotter. Although never marketed, the style shown by the plan is more over what is required of model builder's in the era. It has also been stolen and reproduced at a from a few of the European fee web-sites.


Wm.
coosbaylumber,
I was merely stating a point and trying to answer the question at hand.
When I draw up a set of plans, it is usually for me, and I generally know what I want where. When I am drawing for someone else, yeah, I put on what needs to be put on so someone with no idea what they are looking at would have a fighting chance building what ever it is that I am drawing. I don't feel I need to annotate every detail of a drawing that is not meant for a production run of 1000 kits. I do one off, scratch built, custom planes for me and me only. After all, I look at these drawings as an extension of my hobby, and any time drawing is just as time away from building and flying.

I was not trying to insult you or you credentials. And you can find me listed on a website too, http://www.faa.gov/licenses_certific...certification/


dz1sfb,
there are standard drafting practices,
check out:
http://www.draftingzone.com/about/
http://www.iso.org/iso/standards_dev..._standards.htm

but as far as a checklist, I have no idea. I put on enough so that I know what stuff is or someone else that might use it.
As far as a set of templates, check this thread out:

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=320031

Commonly used items, i.e. servos, control horns, engines/motors/ batteries, pushrods, landing gear, wheels, etc are there. You can also try a google search for rc plane dwgs or dxf files or what ever file extension TurboCAD uses, and you might come up with something. If you are looking for something in particular, I would just ask around. I have, as well as many others have, extensive personal collections of blocks and templates to make the drafting aspect a little faster and easier.

When I was getting into this aspect of this hobby, I downloaded and read over as many different plans as I could to see how and why people designed and drew up plans the way they did.




Like always, this is merely MY opinion and is sure to be different then many other people. take it for what its worth.
Oct 17, 2009, 03:46 AM
Registered User
vintage1's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by plane_tech
The lack of information comes from the fact that I designed it, I am drawing it, and I am building it. No one else sees the plans besides me. I know what is what. .
Lucky you. I have been beaten building from my own plans by failing to read the instructions..I will look at computer code I wrote a year ago and not recognise or understand it. Or even remember writing it!

No, the idiot my plans are for, is me, a month down the line, when all the concentration is gone, and only the drawings remain.


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ElCheepo Catalina From Zoltar CAD Plans. PanzyPoof Scale Kit/Scratch Built 16 Oct 31, 2015 12:50 AM
Yippee! Warbird CAD plans wanted? ;-) HolgerS Foamies (Kits) 2 Apr 18, 2009 06:46 AM
GeeBee R1 prototype scratchbuilt from CAD plans The Blue Max Parkflyers 47 Jan 31, 2004 02:42 AM
Any CAD plans for Gentle Lady type glider? asennad Thermal 5 Dec 01, 2003 10:23 PM
Shrike 400 CAD plans on floppy $6 shipped rcgreaves Aircraft - Electric - Airplanes (FS/W) 0 Nov 27, 2003 06:33 PM