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Sep 11, 2009, 09:19 PM
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Powerpoles Explained


For small, low power (less than 15 Amps) aircraft, like foamies, I like the JSTs.

For larger aircraft I really like Anderson Power Poles. I used Deans for a while and didn't like soldering and I didn't like how difficult they could be to pull apart. Power Poles positively click together but are easy to pull apart. They do not require soldering, although you can do that if you like. For R/C modeling purposes there are 3 ratings/sizes which are 15, 30 & 45 amp contacts that all use the same housing. Therefore, they all plug into each other. The only difference between the 15, 30 & 45 amp contacts is the size of the receiving barrel that holds the wire and the 45 amp is a beefier contact. The 45 amp contact is perfect for 10 Ga. wire. I am a little puzzled why Power Poles are rates them way the way they do because you can put many more amps through them than their rating suggest. I have friends that are consistently putting over 100 Amps through these connectors with no problems and while I have not gone as high as 100 amps, I do regularly exceed the Amp rating suggested by Anderson. Why is this possible?
According to an Anderson Engineer in the article Using Power Poles “The actual rating for a 30-amp Powerpole is for a 30° Celsius (54° Fahrenheit) temperature rise at 30 amps (and 110 volts) using 12-gauge wire” and “that 30-amp connectors would not fail in sustained use until over 200 amps.”

The best price I have found for Powerpoles are from Powerwerx.
http://www.powerwerx.com/

Another place to try is http://qsradio.com/Powerpoles.htm
I have not bought from them yet, but their prices are good and their crimper, $49.73, can do larger 50A and 75A Power Poles.

For the best results at the least cost use the PowerWerx TRIcrimp
http://www.powerwerx.com/product.asp?ProdID=3324&CtgID
I don't recommend the $12 pliar type crimper. The results are inconsistent and will not work on the 45amp connector. I know this because I tried to get by with it for a few months. Currently the crimper's price is $39.99.


If you are going to convert please use the diagram below as the standard. This way you can share charging equipment, batteries and planes with your buddies.
Viewing from the contact side (opposite the wire side), tongue down, hood up, RED on the RIGHT, BLACK on the LEFT, or RRTD, Red Right Tongue Down. Use a 3/32-inch-diameter roll pin, 1/4 inch long, or a drop of super-glue, to keep the housings from sliding apart. (My PPs were tight and didn't slide apart so I haven't used the pin or the super glue. Plus I like the option of being able to slide them apart)


If you are switching your batteries from other connectors to PP, cut off the connector one wire at a time, and leave around an inch of wire. That way you can use the old connector ends to make PP adapters so you can still share batteries with your buds and use their charging equipment too.

Soldered Vs. Crimped
I'll tell you this about crimp vs solder contacts. I worked in the aircraft industry for over 19 years. 12 of that was direct hands on repair over avionics systems. During that time I was a wiring specialist and I am certified by the USAF, Northrop Grumman and Boeing in all kinds of wiring repair and fabrication. Crimping on contacts is the preferred method because, with the proper tools, it is easily taught; consistently reproducible, environmentally seals and does not damaged the wire, contact or insulation. I guarantee you that anyone can strip, crimp and insert and complete set of power poles before a soldering iron is warm enough to use. This is also an advantage in the field when you need to install a new connector. With soldering you can't always be sure how well it will hold up. Many people think they solder well. Too many times I see cold solder joints, melted shielding, improper wire preparation and over heated wire. All of which leads to corrosion and joint failure.

*new additional information*
I found these videos that test how well Deans and Power Poles hold up. The thing I found most interesting not that the Deans itself failed but that the solder joint failed. Still think your soldering skills are good? This further reinforces my belief that crimp is superior to soldered and that Deans offer no benefit to the reliability and ease of use of Power Poles.
These videos are by eddiscus
Anderson deans overview and opinions (1 of 2) (10 min 31 sec)

Anderson deans testing to failure (2 0f 2) (7 min 11 sec)

Sources:
Attached PDFs below
PP45 Connector Data Sheet
Last edited by _OZ_; Jun 18, 2013 at 03:46 PM. Reason: updated links.
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Sep 13, 2009, 03:37 PM
Grumpa Tom
Kmot's Avatar
Good post. I have been using Power Poles for years. They are the best. I try to convert all my friends over to them.

For the argument that "deans are smaller" I made this comparison:
Sep 29, 2009, 09:56 PM
I'd rather be flying!
Lazy Bee's Avatar
I started using APP before APP was cool, & have always liked them. Was first introduced to them when they were on a used Aerobird Extreme we bought in Perry several years back.
Oct 08, 2009, 11:24 AM
Registered User

Insertion tool


I'm a big fan of APP's too. Don't forget to mention the insertion tool. It's a small, relatively cheap tool that inserts the metal connector into the APP plastic part. It will also remove them, which is a great convenience and very difficult without the tool.

Insertion with very limp or smaller diameter wire can be very frustrating without the insertion tool.

With a good crimper and an insertion tool APP blows anything you have to solder away in speed and ease.

As for as price goes, you have to buy 100 from powerwerx before they get close to being cheaper than most online RC hobby sources. Checking just a few places in quantities of 20, Tower is $.75, New Creations RC is $.65 and Powerwerx is $.80 if you buy 25, or $.755 if you buy 50 and $.6975 for a 100. New Creations also has the insertion tool. And no, I am not affiliated with New Creations in anyway

I do want one of those Powerwerx crimp tools though one of these days.
Jan 16, 2010, 10:31 AM
Just "hanging" Around
3D-Dabbler's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by gaRCfield
Are the Duratrax Powerpoles at Tower as good as the Anderson Powerpoles from Powerwerx?

Also, what plug should I get for 10S and 60/85 cont/max amperage?

I think Powerpoles are the logical choice for serious connections.

No, the DuraTrax at Tower are not rated as high. I looked at them for a moment because they were cheaper.

I would use these. http://www.powerwerx.com/anderson-po...pole-sets.html

The power poles current rating is for 120VAC which is a more demanding application than what we are doing with our planes. So, the 45 amp power poles can carry 5400 watts through them without issue. 10S at 80 amps is 3360 watts. So, I think you will be fine but if you want to be safe then the next step up are the 75 amp power poles which will be very capable of handling the load.

Caution: Wires and connectors are more sensitive to the amount current going through them than voltage. So my total watts comparison is just a rough rule of thumb. The most damaging moment for a connector is when they first make contact. The voltage determines how far away they will start arcing. The arcing is what damages the connectors because it concentrates all of the current on an extremely small portion of the connector and starts to vaporize it. The design of the anderson power poles seems to limit arcing. I have not seen or heard any arcing inside my connectors. So, that helps a ton with handling high voltage / high current applications.
Last edited by 3D-Dabbler; Jan 16, 2010 at 10:46 AM. Reason: Adding a current / voltage sensitivity caution.
Jan 16, 2010, 12:01 PM
I am ready for HHAEFI!!
powerlines's Avatar
When you have resistance. you have heat.. I have never felt my powerpoles even warm.. I pull over 100A sometimes.. I use the 45A connectors..
Jul 25, 2010, 08:50 PM
Team Extreme Flight
djmoose's Avatar
Thanks for this...just ordered 10 sets and a crimping tool. I don't like soldering 10ga wire to Deans. I tried the CC bullets, but they to damn hard to pull apart.
Dec 18, 2010, 09:08 PM
Registered User
fatcat220's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rog52
I'm a big fan of APP's too. Don't forget to mention the insertion tool. It's a small, relatively cheap tool that inserts the metal connector into the APP plastic part. It will also remove them, which is a great convenience and very difficult without the tool.

Insertion with very limp or smaller diameter wire can be very frustrating without the insertion tool.

With a good crimper and an insertion tool APP blows anything you have to solder away in speed and ease.

As for as price goes, you have to buy 100 from powerwerx before they get close to being cheaper than most online RC hobby sources. Checking just a few places in quantities of 20, Tower is $.75, New Creations RC is $.65 and Powerwerx is $.80 if you buy 25, or $.755 if you buy 50 and $.6975 for a 100. New Creations also has the insertion tool. And no, I am not affiliated with New Creations in anyway

I do want one of those Powerwerx crimp tools though one of these days.
Where can I buy one of these insertion tools?
Dec 18, 2010, 10:02 PM
It's gone...
_OZ_'s Avatar
Thread OP
I don't use an insertion tool. I use a small flat tip screwdriver to push in the contact by the metal barrel.
Dec 18, 2010, 10:07 PM
30 RC's and counting
Bmr4life's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by _OZ_
I don't use an insertion tool. I use a small flat tip screwdriver to push in the contact by the metal barrel.
Same here.
Dec 18, 2010, 11:37 PM
Registered User
fatcat220's Avatar
That's what I used too, but I thought if there was a specialty tool available, I'd like to get one.
Dec 18, 2010, 11:43 PM
30 RC's and counting
Bmr4life's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatcat220
That's what I used too, but I thought if there was a specialty tool available, I'd like to get one.
Well here you go.
Dec 18, 2010, 11:45 PM
Registered User
fatcat220's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bmr4life
Thanks!
Dec 20, 2010, 12:08 PM
Team Extreme Flight
djmoose's Avatar
Is there any chance that the 10awg inserts for the 45A housings work in the 75A housings?

It's a long shot, I know, but would make my life easier.
Dec 20, 2010, 03:20 PM
30 RC's and counting
Bmr4life's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmoose
Is there any chance that the 10awg inserts for the 45A housings work in the 75A housings?

It's a long shot, I know, but would make my life easier.
Heck no. This is a 75A to 45A adapter.




What are you using that needs a 75A connector? The 45A connector is enough for almost every RC motor on the market.


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