Thread Tools
Nov 23, 2012, 08:33 PM
Mmm, tugs...
patmat2350's Avatar
Thread OP

Windows?


This could be interesting... printed windows!

I hate making windows, especially when there's a jillion of them, all different, and with funny shapes to boot. Oh, and even worse when the exterior surface needs to be flush to the wall. For Sikuliaq's pilot house and crane control booth (printed examples above), that's exactly what I need, yikes.

For the flush fit, a thick window with a flange behind would be perfect... as with many plastic model kits.I was thinking about having these CNC milled, but I don't have access to anything reasonable.

Then I noticed that Shapeways has a yellowish-clear plastic... tinted windows, perfect! It prints with less than optical clarity... but hey these are flat windows, I can polish them easily enough with my Micromesh cloths.

I'll let you know how it turns out...

.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Nov 24, 2012, 07:19 AM
Registered User
Jerome Morris's Avatar
Pat, Could you have had the whole thing printed in clear and then had a "mask" cut for the windows and then sprayed white.
Similar to the canopy mask for airplanes
Nov 24, 2012, 10:08 AM
Mmm, tugs...
patmat2350's Avatar
Thread OP
Could maybe... except the clear stuff is like 2x the cost (not insignificant in a part this size), and I'd have to construct the walls differently, to allow for polishing the interior surfaces... I have a lot of stiffening ribs in there.
This plastic will need to be virtually Blanchard ground and super polished to get it smooth and optically clear.

There are true-clear 3D printing materials available... but not offered at Shapeways...
Nov 24, 2012, 12:41 PM
Registered User
Rmay's Avatar
Pat I saw Shapways is running specials right now. Think it was 10% off, but if yor're buying a lot that could help.
Nov 24, 2012, 01:08 PM
Mmm, tugs...
patmat2350's Avatar
Thread OP
Took advantage last night...

Here's another glazing trick I'll try. Sikuliaq has a bunch (41!) of these flat-sided 24" round port lights ("port holes"). A bear to cut and glaze by hand.

Instead, I'll bore 7/16" round holes in the hull side and bulkheads, pop in an adapter, and sand that smooth to the exterior. Then I'll pop in the glazing plug... which like the windows above, will still require polishing before use. But still a labor saver.
Last edited by patmat2350; Nov 24, 2012 at 01:17 PM.
Nov 25, 2012, 06:47 AM
Registered User
seegurke's Avatar
That's an interesting idea to use the clear material for windows! Never thought of that.
Please keep us informed how these parts are coming out before and after polishing.
Nov 28, 2012, 09:14 AM
Registered User
I know this is not a BOAT, but the idea that you could do something entirely 3-d printed is interesting to me. http://www.wired.com/design/2012/11/...8&viewall=true A makerbot is on my wishlist and I have been thinking of trying to print the parts for a springer or something..... That and the idea of hacking an android cellphone to use as the autopilot is fascinating.
Foo
Nov 30, 2012, 10:03 AM
Registered User
Again, this is NOT a boat but it is some cool things/ideas that are upcoming. Most Hobby shops in this area are within a mile of a STAPLES, if the hobby shop doesn't have what you need then go to staples and have them PRINT it for you! http://www.wired.com/design/2012/11/staples-goes-3-d/ This is the video from the bottom of the page looks kind of cool.....
Mcor Iris True Color 3D Printer (1 min 22 sec)

Foo
Nov 30, 2012, 12:13 PM
r/c ships and workboats
My idea would be to just leave the haze look on the window as long as you do it to them all, not worry about details inside those areas, and just make sure there is a good glossy surface on the outside so it looks like glass.
Dec 07, 2012, 09:41 PM
Registered User
Since there are two threads about 3-d printing and I have posted on both (thus am a subscriber) I will also post this here about an ap that you can use to proof your 3-d project before you print it (or pay shapeways to print it). http://www.wired.com/design/2012/12/willit3dprint/
Foo
Dec 07, 2012, 10:22 PM
Mmm, tugs...
patmat2350's Avatar
Thread OP
Thanks... Nice that there are more and more tools out there to help... but the Wired folks failed to mention that this one is near worthless... more likely they just regurgitated a press release without thinking about it.

Its main point seems to be to show where the model will have the roughest surface... well duh, any surface that is curved, or flat surface not aligned horizontal or vertical, will have more jaggies.
But since Shapeways doesn't give us an option to specify part orientation in the printer, it's a [email protected] anyway. And then, even flat and vertical surfaces can be pretty rough, and the bottom will be different than the top.

The other biggest issue I have at Shapeways is when I violate their minimum wall thickness specs (which are variable, depending on the material and nature of the part). I just lost 2 weeks because they found a thin wall at the last moment, grrr. Some tools will check out all your walls, not this one.

As far as volume/cost etc, that's directly available from both your CAD software and from Shapeways, once your model is loaded.

I now assume all surfaces will be rough, and only submit designs that are flat or convex, with no surface detail, allowing everything to be sanded smooth.
Last edited by patmat2350; Dec 07, 2012 at 11:24 PM.
Dec 11, 2012, 08:42 PM
Mmm, tugs...
patmat2350's Avatar
Thread OP

Windows


OK, if anyone thinks that 3D printed parts make modeling easy, and are ready to use as printed, take a look here.

These window panes are printed with Shapeway's "Clear Detail" plastic... detail schmetail, unless you're trying for corduroy in GI Joe scale! Or maybe siding for log cabins...

Anyway, I left enough stock on the panes so I could sand them smooth and then polish down to 12000 grit MicroMesh, and then finish off with a bit of Meguiar's. The material is still foggy, but the surface is smooth.

BTW, the house is done with Shapeway's "White Strong & Flexible" plastic, which is actually sintered nylon powder. It has the texture of sandstone, and also comes out with lots of rough spots, like maybe a truck drove by the building on that pass of the laser ...
Anyway, I sanded that smooth and filled the plastic with acrylic sanding sealer... I think it will look good once primed and finish sanded.


.
Dec 11, 2012, 10:25 PM
Registered User
Gravman's Avatar
This is why you are "The Man" You always go the extra step. It shows in your finished models. Gives us all something to aspire to. Excellent !
Latest blog entry: Myrtle Corey
Dec 12, 2012, 12:16 AM
BabyBootLegger
sunworksco's Avatar
And to think that I was crucified by everyone here, over a year ago, for saying that 3-D printing was going to help us modelers.
Giovanni
Dec 12, 2012, 10:04 AM
Registered User
Again in WIRED this morning they had an article on learning to make 3-D parts and I am posting it here. Pat has a lot more experience than I ever will with this but for those uninitiated in it here is a start. http://www.wired.com/design/2012/12/...5&viewall=true
Foo


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools