XPS module for Hitec Aurora 9? - Page 3 - RC Groups
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Sep 20, 2009, 12:36 AM
Registered User

as requested


Quote:
Originally Posted by GhostRider32
I'm not sure I understand what you are saying, can you elaborate?

all the new receivers of the different vendors need to stay above a certain voltage before they drop out. typically this only happens when voltage drops for short periods of time due to the particular power set-up, the way the receivers sends out his signals and the type of servos chosen. as a user of the equipment we design our power supply system to deal with these problems. XPS has a warning build in to warn us about this situation. the drop-out voltage of XPS is higher then the one of the competitors - so as a user we have to pay special attention to this. JD has announced a significantly lower drop-out voltage and the ability to send the servo signals sequentially again for his new upcoming designs - so obviously he knows about the vulnerability. whilst this is not the most critical element for me personally it is a point of concern to worry about and take into consideration when setting up a plane. (i had to drop BECs in several larger size planes and put in A123s because of this - which i regard as inconvenient - and BTW this is real i did have lock-outs in flights)
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Sep 20, 2009, 04:25 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Franz2002_01
all the new receivers of the different vendors need to stay above a certain voltage before they drop out. typically this only happens when voltage drops for short periods of time due to the particular power set-up, the way the receivers sends out his signals and the type of servos chosen. as a user of the equipment we design our power supply system to deal with these problems. XPS has a warning build in to warn us about this situation. the drop-out voltage of XPS is higher then the one of the competitors - so as a user we have to pay special attention to this. JD has announced a significantly lower drop-out voltage and the ability to send the servo signals sequentially again for his new upcoming designs - so obviously he knows about the vulnerability. whilst this is not the most critical element for me personally it is a point of concern to worry about and take into consideration when setting up a plane. (i had to drop BECs in several larger size planes and put in A123s because of this - which i regard as inconvenient - and BTW this is real i did have lock-outs in flights)
So you think a123's are only important to use with xps 2.4ghz systems, you need to reread the quotation you inserted. He quotes one competitor as being lower, not all. I beleive that is Futaba and what I think was said in same piece you have edited from was that new XPS gear will be matching that low end voltage rating.

Also on yr other post re small receivers, the same post you have edited from also states the Pico etc receivers are at FCC for approval and will be released some time in the fall. It is only 15 days into fall with apx 75days to go. surely you can hold off changing all yr equipment for such a short wait.

If you cant go buy Jetti, ahhh but thier tied up in FCC now too so I guess it is a level playing field.

Ace
Sep 20, 2009, 06:39 AM
Registered User
I see what you are saying but to me the low voltage issue is a moot point. I never use the bare minimum on any plane I have. A 2 cell A123 pack will stop low voltage dropout on any 2.4 system made AFAIK, doesn't matter if it's 1st generation or 4th generation stuff. Power it properly and it's simply not an issue.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Franz2002_01
all the new receivers of the different vendors need to stay above a certain voltage before they drop out. typically this only happens when voltage drops for short periods of time due to the particular power set-up, the way the receivers sends out his signals and the type of servos chosen. as a user of the equipment we design our power supply system to deal with these problems. XPS has a warning build in to warn us about this situation. the drop-out voltage of XPS is higher then the one of the competitors - so as a user we have to pay special attention to this. JD has announced a significantly lower drop-out voltage and the ability to send the servo signals sequentially again for his new upcoming designs - so obviously he knows about the vulnerability. whilst this is not the most critical element for me personally it is a point of concern to worry about and take into consideration when setting up a plane. (i had to drop BECs in several larger size planes and put in A123s because of this - which i regard as inconvenient - and BTW this is real i did have lock-outs in flights)
Sep 20, 2009, 12:54 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Franz2002_01
all the new receivers of the different vendors need to stay above a certain voltage before they drop out. typically this only happens when voltage drops for short periods of time due to the particular power set-up, the way the receivers sends out his signals and the type of servos chosen. as a user of the equipment we design our power supply system to deal with these problems. XPS has a warning build in to warn us about this situation. the drop-out voltage of XPS is higher then the one of the competitors - so as a user we have to pay special attention to this. JD has announced a significantly lower drop-out voltage and the ability to send the servo signals sequentially again for his new upcoming designs - so obviously he knows about the vulnerability. whilst this is not the most critical element for me personally it is a point of concern to worry about and take into consideration when setting up a plane. (i had to drop BECs in several larger size planes and put in A123s because of this - which i regard as inconvenient - and BTW this is real i did have lock-outs in flights)
The reboot voltage threshold of the original 6/8/10 channel receivers was 3.2v. Since May of this year, that voltage was lowered to 2.9v. Our new receivers (3 channel and satellite receivers) reboot at 2.1v. Servos themselves do not operate below 3.3v, so the reboot voltage is below what servos will work. Other 2.4GHz systems have a higher reboot voltage. Also, our reboot time is a maximum of 300ms (80ms min). Compare that to ANY other 2.4GHz system.
Sep 20, 2009, 05:25 PM
The reviewer
XJet's Avatar
Many of the cheap ($20) Chinese-made 2.4GHz receivers I've been testing will continue operating down to 2.2/2.25V and some have a near-instant recovery from brownout.

You asked for the comparison :-)
Sep 20, 2009, 06:37 PM
Registered User
How many ms in a near instant.
Have you measured this?
Give us a figure; or are you just plucking "facts" out of thin air.
Sep 20, 2009, 06:48 PM
Registered User
Come on Xjet, it's showtime.

Just the facts. Brand names and times.

Put up or shut up!
Sep 20, 2009, 06:49 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJet
Many of the cheap ($20) Chinese-made 2.4GHz receivers I've been testing will continue operating down to 2.2/2.25V and some have a near-instant recovery from brownout.

You asked for the comparison :-)
Are they FCC,CE or C-ticked. OR are you advacating people should just fly anything that can hit a low or high spec in one area.



What is near instant recovery, are you saying 300ms is not near instant?

regards

Richard
Sep 20, 2009, 09:45 PM
300ms is 1/3rd of a second, and represents the worst case scenario. Typical boot/reboot times are under 200ms.
Sep 21, 2009, 01:53 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by Graeme Marion
How many ms in a near instant.
Have you measured this?
Give us a figure; or are you just plucking "facts" out of thin air.
A video showing an Assan Rx recovering from low (<2.6V) voltage. Pay attention to the LED at the corner of the RX (the green light may be hard to see). The spastic servo movements are when the Rx recovers, then voltage is dragged down under again because if servo action, and so on. Actual recovery time is the time the LED is red, Don't know in ms. Not very interesting really, as long as it is below 1s or so. Supply needs time to restore voltage anyway!
Also note that servo works below 3,3V, though not as powerful.

X8R7 (0 min 35 sec)
Sep 21, 2009, 04:02 AM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by flarssen
A video showing an Assan Rx recovering from low (<2.6V) voltage. Pay attention to the LED at the corner of the RX (the green light may be hard to see). The spastic servo movements are when the Rx recovers, then voltage is dragged down under again because if servo action, and so on. Actual recovery time is the time the LED is red, Don't know in ms. Not very interesting really, as long as it is below 1s or so. Supply needs time to restore voltage anyway!
Also note that servo works below 3,3V, though not as powerful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SJ445mR3v8
So you agree with what JD has stated?
Sep 21, 2009, 04:07 AM
The reviewer
XJet's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Graeme Marion
Come on Xjet, it's showtime.

Just the facts. Brand names and times.

Put up or shut up!
Just visit RC Model Reviews for the review of the FlySky, Corona DSSS, FlyDream and (shortly) the Assan.

Most of this Chinese gear has a very low dropout voltage and rapid relink following restoration of normal operating voltage.
Oct 03, 2009, 09:18 PM
Registered User
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimDrew
Hitec told me both PPM and digital pins are there. The additional pins are the digital pins. Their older moduls are not compatible because they won't fit. Unless the data stream is heavily encrypted we should be able to use the digital pins.
The Hitec 2.4GHz module has legacy PPM input pins so it can be used in their older Tx but the Aurora Tx interface is digital so for anyone to make a module to suit the Aurora either Hitec will have to release the interface specification (electrical, logical, frame format and protocol) or it will have to be reverse engineered. As you say, if they have encrypted the data it will make it too hard for anyone to bother making after-market modules that connect via the module pins. It might also be possible to make a module which is a physical match but connects to the trainer port.
Sep 17, 2012, 04:45 PM
Thermals, Tom
RyanNX211's Avatar
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimDrew
We have been selling a telemetry option since July of 2008. 900MHz is U.S./Canada only and we will be offering it this fall along with all new XtremeLink hardware.
Fall 2012? I hope so.
I saw three DSMX lockouts at Muncie last week (two were my own). That's way down from last year but in that time Spektrum has gone from being the most to the least prevalent system (among the big manufacturers)


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