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Old Sep 08, 2009, 11:45 AM
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Just bought a ARX 540! :-D
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Originally Posted by earljun
HI Guys, have found this video, quite interesting!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2oVfSAkob0
awesome video love the last bit on concrete bank!
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Old Sep 08, 2009, 02:11 PM
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scale microlights
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterz
do you know what the HPI quad rider is made from is it heavy
the hpi rider is made from some sort of thick plastic and would be alot heavier than the anderson lexan rider,
id imagine it would affect the handling alot and not for the better!
Old Sep 08, 2009, 03:59 PM
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hello!
it is necessary glued the tire rear to 100%???
if it glued not it can make maintenance to the gyroscope
so that it is the brush???

sorry for my english

thanks
Old Sep 08, 2009, 04:10 PM
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I just got one of these bikes and just been out with it they are very stable a bit too stable for me .you can drive in front of you and stop dead then pull away again without it falling over.the thing I dont like is it does'nt turn very well and the front wheel constantly slaps side to side even on a car park.

do you need to run the motors in mine seems very slow compared to my thunder tiger bike I thought it would be faster having a 15 turn motor
Old Sep 08, 2009, 04:27 PM
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I haven't glued my rear tyre, thoug hI have removed it a few times to remove grease that has oozed from the guyro and caused tyre slip on the rim.

With a drip of WD40 on the com and bearings the kit motor runs ver ywell on a 2S LiPo, yeah brushless motor will be faster and maybe more efficient but for starters it's plenty good enough.

If the bike is too stable for you and slow to turn remove all 5 of the bob weights and the clamp rings from the gyro, and tighten the steering spring collets slightly, sorted.
Old Sep 08, 2009, 04:33 PM
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I just removed the rear tyre and its full of oil wheres it coming from
should I put grease on the gears in the gyro
Last edited by spenny; Sep 08, 2009 at 05:48 PM.
Old Sep 08, 2009, 06:50 PM
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For a gyro bike I think it turns well, of course you have to slow down a bit my brushless M5 must be doing over 40mph and still turns good enough for me even with the gyro spinning at silly speed like Dez says just tighten up the steering springs if you want more, as for the oil in the tire we have all had this, think the grease they use is not up to the job, I took mine apart took the weights out then cleaned everything up and regreased the planet gears with a very high melting point grease, only a little is needed on the pins and gears then siliconed the two halfs of the wheel to gether to stop anymore grease finding its way out of the wheel. I am now just going to run it and run it to see how it is going to stand up to that brushless abuse and what if anything is going to melt break or fall off. Do not glue the rear tire on as you will not be able to get to the gyro if you need to, if like me you run a high powerd brushless set up you will have to glue the front one, but there is no problem with the rear. I am running this at the absolute limit as to what I think it can handle with no problems at the mo, so like I said the standard bike will run on on forever, even a mild brushless would be fine, I might buy another set of gears to see if I can ballrace them, but for now will just run it as it is and see how long it lasts, watch this space
Old Sep 08, 2009, 07:27 PM
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Thanks for the advice I have taken the weights out of the gyro and put it back together but stripped all the threads in the wheel why they use machine thread going into plastic thats the one big let down on this bike the quality of materials

is there a trick to getting the tyre back on
Old Sep 08, 2009, 07:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spenny
Thanks for the advice I have taken the weights out of the gyro and put it back together but stripped all the threads in the wheel why they use machine thread going into plastic thats the one big let down on this bike the quality of materials

is there a trick to getting the tyre back on
There is no quality of materials issue on this bike, I had no problems with the M/C screws, you just have to be carefull when tightening anything that screws into plastic, m/c screws are much better than self tappers !
Old Sep 09, 2009, 05:02 AM
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If you strip a machine screw just use a self tapper, plenty of material left there.

As for getting the back tyre on, poke the assembled wheel into the tyre like you are posting a letter throug ha round hole, i.e. put it on sideways so it 90 degrees across the wheel, then pull one bead one way and the other the other way, literally twist it onto the rim, sorted, takes seconds.

I like the idea of a smear of silicone to seal the two wheel halves together, might run a little light oil in the wheel and let it splash about in there like a wet sump.... that might keep the gears happy.
Old Sep 09, 2009, 06:31 AM
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I did think of doing that Dez, but dont think the clutch would like it, but it is sure something to think about
Old Sep 09, 2009, 06:38 AM
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I am keeping my rear wheel dry, just using associated diff grease, and a drop of chain oil on the one way bearing. Don't like the idea of liquid, it will only get thrown to outside with Centrufugal force, and not stay where you want it.

Andrew
Old Sep 09, 2009, 06:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dez82
If you strip a machine screw just use a self tapper, plenty of material left there.

As for getting the back tyre on, poke the assembled wheel into the tyre like you are posting a letter throug ha round hole, i.e. put it on sideways so it 90 degrees across the wheel, then pull one bead one way and the other the other way, literally twist it onto the rim, sorted, takes seconds.

I like the idea of a smear of silicone to seal the two wheel halves together, might run a little light oil in the wheel and let it splash about in there like a wet sump.... that might keep the gears happy.

cheers I got the tyre on.I put some instant gasket to seal the two halves of the wheel together and was going to use diff oil but you need to seal the axel aswell so I just used grease
Old Sep 09, 2009, 06:51 AM
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I know this might be a silly question but why do you get a toothbrush with the bike
Old Sep 09, 2009, 07:11 AM
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To keep the chain and sprocket clear of grass that builds up when you run off road.
They even list the toothbrush as a spare part


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