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May 05, 2009, 05:14 PM
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Finishing Up the Last of the Planking


Got the last of the hull planks on this morning. Then after the glue had a chance to cure up the hull was block sanded to prep for filling the gaps between the planks.
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May 05, 2009, 05:18 PM
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Filling the Gaps


Though not severe, there were a few wide spots between the planks, so a coat of drywall mud was mixed up to a fairly light consistancy and sqeegeed onto the hull. Where the gaps were bigger then just a hairline, the mud was pusshed into the gap, then pulled off level.

After a couple hours drying time, the entire hull was hand sanded to level it all up. Looks like the first coat did the trick, so now its time for a bit of fiberglass.
May 05, 2009, 05:22 PM
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Laying Up the Fiberglass


The hull was vacumed to remove the worst of the dust, then wiped down with a damp cloth to prep for fibergalss. A piece of 2 oz. cloth was cut to rough size, layed over the hull and trimmed to remove the wrinkles. Then a coat of West Systems resin was brushed on. The resin was thinned about 30% with denatured alcahol to insure goo pentration into the wood.

Once the lay-up has cured, the wxess cloth will be trimmed and the hull removed from the board and a heavy coat of resin brushed on the inside as well.

PAT
May 05, 2009, 05:44 PM
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Coming along nicely, Pat!
May 05, 2009, 06:13 PM
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Midwest's instructions are to glass one side at a time- you do it all at once is this simply to save time? Is there a "trick" to doing this properly?
May 05, 2009, 09:17 PM
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Habanero, The hardest part of laying up fiberglass (at least for me) is the seams and edges. So to avoid the line down the center of the keel, I drape the cloth over the entire hull, slit it up the middle where it will meet at the bow and stern and trim it accordingly. On one side at the bow I'll trim it a little short so that it doesn't roll over the bow, then roll the other side over with about an inch of cloth on the other side. Then, I'll lay up the short side on top of the overlap. At the stern, the transom pieces are trimmed to overlap about a half inch in the middle of the transom.

But there is a catch to all this, and that is that I don't use hobby quality cloth for this task. The hobby quality junk -- I mean stuff -- you buy from the hobby shop is so full of starch and/or sizing to keep it stiff in the package makes it nearly impossible to work into the compound curves that make up a typical boat hull, especially at the transom and the pointy part of the bow.

The untreated "full scale quality" cloth handles a lot like silk, and can be easily worked around all kinds of compound curves, both concave and convex. And the best part is that the resin permiates the cloth very well, preventing it from trapping air under the cloth making bubbles that are really difficult to repair.

PAT
May 06, 2009, 02:14 AM
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Yes the bubbles were a nightmare- even after it had mostly dried I thought I was in the clear but more showed up later.

Thanks
May 06, 2009, 07:31 AM
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Habanero, Yep, it only took once to cure me of all that. Same goes with "hobby quality" resins. Now I use West Systems resin exclusively, and order the cloth from Aircraft Spruce and Specialty, and have not had the problem since. Meanwhile, the cloth I used on TR is from a large roll I bought at a swap meet a year or so ago. Don't know how much is on the roll, but it weighs about 30 lb. Should hold me for awhile.

PAT
May 11, 2009, 09:03 PM
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Pulling the Hull Off the Board


With the fiberglass on the outside cured out nicely, the hull was removed from the building board and the inside sealed.

A bead of West Systems and Micro Balloons was appled to all the frames and the keel flooded to insure a good seal. Then the inside of the planks were coated with thinned resin to seal them up.
May 11, 2009, 09:06 PM
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Adding the Motor and Prop Shaft.


A 12 volt Speed 400 motor is used to power the TR when not under sail. The stuffing box was made up from brass tubes, and the coupler from Tygon gas line secured with Zip-Ties.
May 11, 2009, 09:09 PM
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Adding the Hatch Combing and Hard Points


The hatch combing was glued in place in the slots on the frames. Then the hard points for the mast and mast rigging were added. The mast block is oak, the rigging blocks are pine.
May 11, 2009, 09:12 PM
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Building Up the Cockpit


The cockpit assembly is built up from balsa and light ply. The floor on the forward floor board has the hatch cut in for access to the prop shaft coupling should there be a problem. The way I figure it, if you can get to it, it'll never be a problem. If you can't...........
May 11, 2009, 09:15 PM
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Building In the Bowsprit Hard Points


Since the Bowsprit will carry the load of the forward sails, it needs to be mounted securely, so a pine block was added to the front former, and a ply plate to the bow. Should hold up OK.
May 11, 2009, 09:19 PM
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Getting Started on the Main Cabin


The main cabin assembly is built up from balsa and lite ply frames and stringers. The frame will be skinned in 1/8 Balsa.

At this point, it looks like the insides are in pretty good shape, so it's about time to get the deck fitted and glued in place..

PAT
May 14, 2009, 08:59 PM
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Setting Up the Rudder Steering


This part had me doing some serious head scratching for a day or two, but it actually turned out to be reasonably simple.. Since most of the rudder linkage will be inaccessable, and since we couldn't have the push rod running through the cockpit well, the only option was a closed loop pull/pull system.

But first, the rudder was hinged using 3/32 braze rod and cotter pins. Bass stand-off's were glued in place on the hull and drilled to resieve the hingw pins.

Then building the actual linkage began with the tiller arm that will prodrude throug the deck with a two sided control horn below the desck to conect the cables to. And of course, it had to pivot to work right. The servo is mounted inside the main cabon on the front bulkhead of the cockpit assembly.


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