Thread Tools
Mar 16, 2009, 07:24 PM
Registered User

Balsa Wood Seats


Pat-
I'm a "newbie" here to the site and the hobby so bear with me.
I am working on the 1949 Runabout and the seats made of balsa. I've cut sanded and applied/sanded the first couple of coats of "dope". The next step calls for the application of tissue with the dope. My question is, do you just cut a piece of tissue that fits the flat side of the "cushion"? I tried using a piece that would cover the entire piece, top, bottom and sides but could not get it to where it wouldn't have any wrinkles.
Thanks and your projects look fantastic.
Sign up now
to remove ads between posts
Mar 16, 2009, 08:40 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP
Kmot, I try REAL hard not to get messy with the Cya. BTW, what you see on the wood is the kicker, not a glue residue. At this point there isn't any Cya showing on the outside. Here's how I do it;

I start by laying a bead of medium Cya on the sub-planking down the full length of the hull. I'll start at the bow and lay the strip down and kick it for the first inch or so. Then worling rearward, pressing the plank down just a few inches at a time and tack it with a drop of kicker about every 4" or so. Once the whole plank is attached I'll run a small bead of kicker all the way along the plank.

Now, since no one is exempt from getting a little messy, there will always be a spot of Cya hear and there, but so far I've never been in a spot where there's enough to adversly effect the finish.

PAT
Mar 16, 2009, 08:51 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP
Chris, Applying the tissue to the seats requires a bit of practice to get the technique working for you. I do the seat cushons in on piece -- and yes, there will be some wrinkles to deal with. But, if you approach it like it were a full scale seat, you can actually place the wrinkles and overlaps in the corners, just like on the real thing. Or if you prefer a smooth flowing surface, you can make slits in the corners and overlap it. The edge can be lighly sanded after the doping is done to blend it away.

With that being said, if you can find some light (0 or 00) silkspan at your local HS, or from a friend who uses the stuff it can be applied wet, and most of the wrinkles will be a non-issue by the time it dries. You can apply the kit supplied tissue wet as well, but what you have is a domestic tissue that becomes very delicate when wet, and is REALLY easy to tare, so I wouldn't recommend that just at this stage of the game.

Beyond that, it just takes practice. In fact, you might want to make up a couple of test pieces and practice a bit before you commit to the kit seats.

PAT
Mar 17, 2009, 05:08 AM
Registered User
I got around the stain/glue/no penetration problem by fitting the plank, staining it, and then gluing it in place.
Mar 20, 2009, 05:31 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP

Finishing Up the Planking


Got busy the other day and finished up laying in the bottom planking. The staining you see in the pics is from the kicker. Pat M says, "try not to be messy". He's absolutely right, the less mess you make, the less mess there will be to kleen up.
Mar 20, 2009, 05:35 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP

Into the Cockpit


The next step in assembling the hull is to fit the floor boards. The fronts are glued in place, the aft section is fitted, but won't be glued in until later. All of the parts were slightly oversized allowing each to be trimmed for a nice fit.
Mar 20, 2009, 05:37 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP

On To the Upper Deck


The upper deck formers were glued in place and the center line stringers added. The side boards were also laminated together to be installed later.
Mar 20, 2009, 05:41 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP

Gluing the Deck and Side Boards In Place.


The fore and aft decks are dye cut 3 MM Sintra. The parts are a bit oversise and allow plenty of "wiggle room" to get things trimmed and fitted befor gluing. The Side boards are also a bit oversize in bothe length and width, and will need to be fitted before gluing them in place.
Mar 20, 2009, 05:46 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP

Adding the Foredeck planking and Transom Planking


The foredeck planking consists of a dye cut center board, .040 X .080 styrene strips, and the 1/4" wide mahogany planks. The planks and caulk strips were fitted into the bow light base.

The transom planking can be done with strips, but a dye cut mahogany transom is provided, so I saw no reason to strip plank it since using the single piece was much easier, and will look fine when shee's done.
Mar 20, 2009, 05:55 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP

Sanding the Hull and Prepping for Stain


With all the planking in place, the entire assembly was given a good rough sanding using 100 grit paper in the orbital palm sander. Once the sanding was done it was done again using 180 grit, also in the palm sander.

Then the small gaps between the planks were filled using Famowood wallnut filler putty. This stuff dries hard and sands well, and doesn't shrink or crack.

The hull was then given a final sanding with 220 grit paper. The only thing left was to dill the center seam on the deck using spot glaze putty. It took 3 applications to get the seam cleaned up. If I had it to do again I would definitely use Bondo -- it would have saved a lot of drying time.
Mar 20, 2009, 06:00 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP

Staining the Hull


With all the prep work done, the last of the dust was blown off with compressed air and the hull sides, bottom, transom and sideboards were given a coat of Cabot oil based Early American stain. And finally, the foredeck planking was stained with the kit supplied water based orange stain.

From here, it's on to fiberglass. Once the stain has thoroughly dried all of the mahogany will be sealed up and finished with 2 oz. cloth and West Systems resin.

PAT
Mar 20, 2009, 06:41 PM
Grumpa Tom
Kmot's Avatar
Thanks for the replies about the wood not taking any color staining. Just to clear something up, I am not messy when I use CA. If I was I would not have any fingerprints left.

My concern came from the fact the CA soaks into the wood, through the grain structure, and then stain and varnish will not penetrate.

It seems instantly 'kicking it' with accelerant is the solution. Thanks again for addressing this problem.
Mar 21, 2009, 05:56 AM
Registered User
When planking my 16' hydro, I brushed kicker onto the sintra subdeck and then applied ca to my plank. I had to position the plank quickly, though... as it bonded right away. I had no problems with ca soaking through the planks, and I did not waste kicker by overspraying it.
Mar 31, 2009, 09:06 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP

Fiber Glassing the Hull


Been sidetracked on some more pressing projects, but was able to get the fiberglass on the hull late this afternoon. Believe it or not, I was able to lay up the hull in a single piece of 2.45 oz. cloth. Hey, nobody was more surprised then I was, but the hull shape lends itself well to working the cloth down needing only to make cuts on the corners of the transom where it meets the hull sides.

PAT
Mar 31, 2009, 09:12 PM
Registered User
P. Tritle's Avatar
Thread OP
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kmot
Thanks for the replies about the wood not taking any color staining. Just to clear something up, I am not messy when I use CA. If I was I would not have any fingerprints left.

My concern came from the fact the CA soaks into the wood, through the grain structure, and then stain and varnish will not penetrate.

It seems instantly 'kicking it' with accelerant is the solution. Thanks again for addressing this problem.
K, A good trick I've used to get the planks down without soaking up too much Cya is to prime the plank with kicker, then apply the glue to the hull and then carefully lay the planking down. Doing it this way the cure is almost instant, so no glue soaks into the board.

Now, I know you've been around enough to know that the board has to be positioned right when contact is made, but I wouldn't recommend this technique to any builder until he's laid a few planks and understands the in's and out's of getting the planks positioned properly on the very first try.

PAT


Quick Reply
Message:

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Category Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Discussion Dumas 1940 Chris craft 19' barrelback riggerman Scale Boats 16 Oct 16, 2007 02:01 AM
Question Dumas 19' Chris Craft racer - Hull Painting Anton70 Scale Boats 10 Mar 29, 2006 08:25 PM
Dumas 1940 Chris-Craft Barrel Back Tom73 Scale Boats 10 Dec 18, 2005 05:28 PM
Wanted Dumas 1940 Chris Craft Barrel Back kit Airnut 2 Boats (FS/W) 0 Dec 15, 2005 05:15 AM
Dumas 1940 Chris Craft Barrel back kit richphoto Boats (FS/W) 2 May 12, 2003 09:29 PM