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Archive for July, 2014
Posted by mike_kelly | Jul 24, 2014 @ 09:43 AM | 15,512 Views
There is a lot of discussion about mounting ESCs out on the ends of the arms. The issue is that the high current flowing thru the power lines feeding the ESCs can form an electric field around the wires. This electric field creates something like a resistance, called an impedance, to the flow of power to the ESC. Unlike pure resistance, which there is nothing you can do about it, you can mitigate the effect of an impedance by balancing the effect of the two contributors to impedance - capacitance and inductance. Since the high current flowing in the ESC feed wires creates an inductive impedance you can reduce the effect by adding capacitance.

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...ght=ESC+length

https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/show...ght=ESC+length

There are arguments for and against where you put your ESC's.
On the frame:
1. Shorter power leads to motor as recommended by ESC manufacturers.
2. More protected from crashes inside.

On the motor mounts:
1. Cooler due to prop wash.
2. Less crowded inside the frame
3. Easier to get at to replace.
4. Must add capacitors if length of arm longer than 20cm
5. Radio freq noise generated by ESC further away from Flight Controller.

If you research the discussion on RCGroups , there is a whole thread on the subject, you will find the recommendation that if you want to put ESC's further out than about 10cm you should add some capacitance.

"As a rule of thumb, for every 4inch/10cm extra length/distance between battery and ESC,...Continue Reading
Posted by mike_kelly | Jul 20, 2014 @ 04:04 PM | 8,858 Views
What you say, no way! I know all your images of the Blackout are screaming through the woods dodging branches. Well hear me out.

Like probably the majority of folks now on RCGroups I am a noob. I did not know how to spell RC last year. The year before I got a Hawkeye delta wing RC kite for an aerial photography project. But I really had a hard time with the change in orientation as the plane returned. I gave up. It really was not the right platform for me because I need to hover to compose images.

So last year I saw someone's Phantom and was really impressed by the flight controller, this should solve me problem I thought. So I rushed out and bought a Phantom. Then I discovered how small a gopro was and that I was not going to lift my cameras with a Phantom. So I decided to canabalize my Phantom and build an F450. Not a good idea. It worked but it was difficult to troubleshoot problems with the Phantom receiver and transmitter which were never intended to do any job other than the Phantom.

I started over reading. I followed advise to get a little hubsan or a proto and learn the feel of the sticks. I still had trouble with orientation changes. The little guys also did not quite fly the same as the bigger cousins.

Then I discovered the APM with it's autonomous flight capability and open source community. I read all I could find on RCGroups. Then I read some more.

I realized I was not going to get what I needed without a much much bigger lift platform. I...Continue Reading
Posted by mike_kelly | Jul 20, 2014 @ 01:07 PM | 7,067 Views
Just some images of what came in the kit and the notes from Marek on how to space the larger 4.3" monitor away from the back. The shell is the same size as the 3.5" kit but the buttons are on the opposite side to match Marek's Cyclops monitor which indeed does not blue screen when signal is lost.