Posted by Normanshouse | Today @ 05:22 PM | 1,174 Views
Looking for a Midwest super stinker kit, new in box, unopened preferable, if opened all parts must be accounted for. Shipping insured and double boxed
Posted by xatled99 | Today @ 01:13 PM | 3,322 Views
took my younger son on his first flights this year, also made a handful of flights up to ny. it was another maintenance-intensive year, but hopefully getting to the end of that.

set up an ipad + xbox controller as a budget RC sim for my older son; i reckon he'll transition to the umx radian and cub quite easily now. got him a losi mini-b for his birthday, which he's been enjoying; he'll probably be ready for the stampede soon.
Posted by Old_Pilot | Today @ 10:03 AM | 5,242 Views
Here are the drawings and printwood for "Das Ugly Glider", my take on a 60" powered glider, inspired by Phil Kraft's Ugly Stik. I wanted an easy-to-build mid sized glider that didn't require a tow, winch, or hi-start to fly, and since my favorite all time airplane is the Ugly Stik (I think I've built at least 6 of them), I decided to use that as my basis for design.

I also chose to use the "tab-in-slot" technique for assembly, and it paid off. This thing went together in no time.

So, in tribute to Mr. Kraft, I give you :

Das Ugly Glider

64" tip to tip
Clark-YH airfoil (modified)
17gram metal gear digital servos
6-channel Spectrum receiver
2217-07 1200 kV motor (480 size)
8x4 folding prop
40 amp ESC
2200 mah 35C 3-cell

The assembly is pretty straight forward, though I leave it up to the builder to chose how to hinge the control surfaces, servo placement, shear webs, and spar joiners. I have my own way of doing things, but they may not fit another builders techniques. At any rate, it's just a Stik, albeit with the proportions and aspect ratio of an old school glider.

Have fun

Oh, and here's a better "glamour" shot.
Posted by rickp | Today @ 08:06 AM | 6,328 Views
Funny how inspiration strikes - you can never tell when or where it will come from.
I came across a picture of Joe Bridi's classic 1970 Kaos in "Model Aviation" and built a PhoenixRC model of it.
All well and good - looks nice and flies like it's on rails - and Katana gave it high praise.
But then I noticed the simple boxy fuselage, and the light bulb came on.

Wouldn't it be nice as a FliteTest style foam board model?
If I built it in the same scale as my FT mini Mustang I could borrow the "swappable" power plant as a test bed.
And if I made the wings removable it would be great to take with me when I traveled.
Probably best to move the wings to the top of the fuselage then.
And get rid of the gear for simplicity.
And so it begins . . . . . . .

First step was modeling the HW (High Wing) version in Phoenix. Quick and easy, and not much difference in how it flies.
Then create a Phoenix model of a foam board version. Here I borrowed liberally from my existing Phoenix mini Mustang model.
And that version still flies great - no big surprise there.

Next the hard part begins - translate the Phoenix model into a real life model.
Meanwhile, here's what it looks like in PhoenixRC. Stay tuned!

Kaos HW FMY PhoenixRC tour:
Kaos HW FMY Tour (0 min 41 sec)


Kaos HW FMY PhoenixRC flight:
Kaos HW FMY Flight (1 min 13 sec)
...Continue Reading
Posted by Calypso6858 | Yesterday @ 06:43 PM | 14,206 Views
Savoia-Marchetti S.56: The S.56 was a classy little Italian amphibian from the 1920s. It was developed in the early 20s as a seaplane trainer and touring airplane. It’s unusual cockpit configuration had seats for two up front with side by side controls and a third seat in a separate cockpit behind with no controls.

Initially it was pulled along by a 70hp Anzani but it was soon replaced by a 80hp version and had its wings lengthened. Throughout its production it received larger and larger radials up to 135hp. The engine was mounted on a nacelle which hung below the bottom of the top wing almost directly above the occupants.

Interestingly the S.56 was fairly popular in the US market. In 1929 AAC (American Aeronautical Corporation) began producing the airplane under license. The US version was powered with a 90hp Kinner and spawned another stranger variant. The Budd Company (an industrial company) decided to build one entirely out of stainless steel. The Budd Pioneer as it was named, proved to be a successful airplane. Successful in that it did fly and float. Not so much in production as it was the only one built.

In total there were around 70 of them built with the majority of them being American built. Today I believe there are two surviving examples with one being in a museum in Italy and one at Fantasy of Flight in Florida....Continue Reading
Posted by Monty49 | Yesterday @ 10:21 AM | 19,195 Views
This might seem sad to some but I need to write it down so my husband might be able to see it. In November the love of my life jumped on heavens airplane and departed my arms. We were together for over 30 years and it has left a big hole in my heart that not even glue & duck tape can fix.
Some of you have met him Mike “Grizz” Shaw. He was a CD in the AMA for most of those years, he was the President for 15 years of the Southern Oregon Slopeiens of which he founded. We all will miss him. Mike keep your “Tips” up.
And a word to all the wives….
Ladies out there enjoy your love ones hobbies whatever they are; join in on the fun.
Posted by GBLynden | Dec 05, 2021 @ 11:11 PM | 25,386 Views
This is my Maiden Flight with the HobbyKing Avios Albatross HU-16 V2 US Coast Guard Flying Boat. It is based on the Grumman HU-16 Albatross.

Maiden Flight - HobbyKing Avios Albatross HU-16 V2 US Coast Guard Flying Boat (6 min 12 sec)

Posted by Jack Crossfire | Dec 05, 2021 @ 08:27 PM | 26,473 Views
New ball links were printed at 220C. Careful use of the pliers got them on without delaminating. Ground a flat in the pushrod to aid the pliers. Tried lubricating the ball joints to try to keep any material from wearing off. Disappointing how fast PLA stretches & comes loose. Another idea might be TPU ball links.

Then came the well loved paw controller with water damage to the steering traces & a ground trace. Nearly the entire circuit is now potted. Removed an unused bodge wire. The power switch has a developing sticking in the off position which can be overcome by pulling it out. This too is probably water damage.
Posted by nsg | Dec 05, 2021 @ 05:18 PM | 27,474 Views
A quick how-to on using an eAnSys gearbox with a 24"-26" prop, based on my experiments, other people's posted data and some calculations.

The optimal rpm range for a light CF 24-25"13" pitch prop seems to be 6200-7000 rpm, 6kwt or less. 6200-6500rpm for a 26" prop, about 7.5kwt. Props differ, of course, so look up data for your prop. This post mostly deals with Falcon Electric CF.
  • Use the Single-Gear-L gearbox. If you want to use the 26" prop, get the power expander. That ensures more of the belt in contact with the motor pulley, so the belt can take more load.
  • Pick a 5-6kwt heli motor if you are looking to use a 24" or 25" prop, 7-8kwt motor for the 26"
  • Target rpms, the expected voltage and your motor's kV will let you estimate the GB ratio. Alternatively, you can pick a GB ratio and adjust for motor kV.
  • Get a couple of extra pulleys, to adjust based on your measurements/flying preferences. eAnSys gearboxes can be tweaked for lower rpm/more flight time or more power - takes about ten minutes to remove the spinner/prop/cowl, replace the pulley and put it all back together.
Example:
  • I'd like to turn a Falcon CF electric 24x13 at 6500 rpm. That should take 130-140A, so 6kwt max, so probably no need for the power expander.
  • I'll use the 2.57 to 4.0 version of the gearbox. Motor rpm under full load are (prop rpm)*(gb ratio). We get 16700 to 26000 rpm.
  • I need the unloaded motor rpms to compute the motor kV range, so divide by 0.9 (
...Continue Reading
Posted by old4570 | Dec 05, 2021 @ 05:14 PM | 27,498 Views
P1B 1 electric FF (3 min 32 sec)


I got up , and there was zero wind outside ...
It was supposed to be 15 to 25 kmh ............

Put the model in the car ( no wind ) , 2 minute drive to the park = Wind is blowing ..............

Anyways , a quick test chuck ...... A CG adjustment ... And then a power run ..

I was in a hurry , Cos the wind was picking up every second .. ( As I type this it's just about a gale out there )

So looks like proof of concept ....

It's nice to be right some times !
Posted by Suphoj xam | Dec 05, 2021 @ 02:09 PM | 28,671 Views
- Hope this is useful
- 7.4v 1300mah-14500 (size AA) Battery mod Fs-i6x (4 cell-2S)
**The duration of use depends on the quality of the battery.**
Posted by R_G | Dec 05, 2021 @ 10:47 AM | 29,997 Views
After trying various ways to cut balsa into triangle stock and not being very happy with the results I decided to design my own tri-stock stripper and came up with this handy little tool. With it I've been able to get consistent results stripping balsa sticks as long as 36". It's designed to work with soft to medium weight balsa and can produce 1/8”, 5/32”, 3/16”, 1/4”, 5/16” & 3/8” tri-stock. With the optional 1/2” adapter, 1/2” triangle stock can be made. Hard balsa will not work very well and will most likely jam and possibly damage the tool.

This tool is produced on a Formlabs Form3 SLA 3D resin printer utilizing their Tough 2000 resin. It is very durable.

For anyone that might be interested the stripper is available for purchase through my website here.

Ralph
Posted by Calypso6858 | Dec 05, 2021 @ 09:39 AM | 30,312 Views
Arrow Sport F & M: The Arrow Sport began life as the Model F. F being for the Ford which powered it. The Bureau of Air Commerce wanted to research the viability of converted car engines and Arrow was up to the task.

The initial design was a two seat side-by-side, strut braced low wing configuration with an 85hp Ford V-8 power plant. The design was tweaked with larger tail feathers and the center portion of the wing was narrowed to avoid blocking airflow to the tail during landing. The resulting prototype airplane was certified for production, a rarity for converted car engines.

The Ford which powered the airplane was a typical flathead Ford V-8 with some parts replaced with aluminum for weight savings. The engine housed a 2:1 Gearbox on the front and swung a large slow turning sensenich wood propeller. All together the engine and gearbox weighed over 400lbs and only produced 85hp. Compared to an equivalent 85hp Continental which weighs less than 200lbs, the Arrow Sport was far from a high performance airplane.

The Model F was marketed for sale at a modest $1500 and saw a surprising interest considering its performance limitations. It could be ordered as an open or closed cockpit and near the end of its production run it could be ordered as the “Arrow Sport M” which had a 125hp Menasco instead of the Ford. In total 103 made it off the production line. Today there is one Arrow Sport M surviving in private ownership and at least half a dozen surviving Fs in various...Continue Reading
Posted by Quagga75 | Dec 05, 2021 @ 05:45 AM | 31,445 Views
A digital copy of the original from WIK with the e393 airfoil "Strak" as discussed here.

To convert the .dat files to accurate .dxf I can recommend the open source Profil Converter.
Posted by Jack Crossfire | Dec 05, 2021 @ 02:19 AM | 32,285 Views
As the weather cooled, the humidity hit 100%, & the lion sweated, full left glitches mounted. The lion kingdom believes it was water intrusion in the stick controller. Walking speed made the glitches go away. A steering linkage also came loose, as the PLA eventually stretched until it no longer gripped. This ended the trip after 16.9 miles.
Posted by vonBird | Dec 05, 2021 @ 12:45 AM | 32,611 Views
This is my Dad and me in the early '90s. My Dad's approach to building aircraft, was to make many improvements to the traditional aircraft as possible and to set standards even higher than may be possible. Most of his aircraft surpassed, even his own standards.

My education about building aircraft came from hundreds of hours in discussion with him about every aspect of aircraft design and development.

This was his career:
http://airportjournals.com/ed-swearingen/
Posted by old4570 | Dec 04, 2021 @ 07:41 PM | 33,833 Views
Hmmmm , In deed .....

Ok the problem with the P1B-1 ...

The folding prop was the problem ..

A) The prop weighs too much
B) RPM and torque roll are effected by the heavy prop
C) Props hangs or folds , changes CG
D) The folding prop is a nasty cheap affair ...

So after a while I realized the folding prop was the problem and the model was hung up as an ornament .

The other day one of my FF models with a timed electrical system fell onto the floor .... Ding Ding !
And a idea flashed into my brain ...
For over a year I have been wondering what to do with the P1B-1 , mostly geared around some form of RC .
But what if I could ? Fit one of these timed electrical power systems ...

The battery fits in the tube , the timer / switch fits in the tube ..
I 3D printed a motor mount for the pusher set up .
The P1B-1 glides amazing without that brick of a factory prop .
The power system has been tested in doors , but not out doors ( very windy ) + the mod is barely 24 hours old .
It looks promising !

I was lucky , the 3D printed mount came out perfect 1st time out .
The motor is a 7mm DIA and the system uses a Lipo battery that is USB charged VIA the timer .
There is not enough power to pull vertical , but horizontal should be fine ..
Hopefully be some fun , especially as the rubber powered factory set up was a PITA .

What I need now !
Is to 3D print a nose cone that allows me to push the start button ..
My 1st attempt at such was a full fail
Posted by Old_Pilot | Dec 04, 2021 @ 09:56 AM | 35,832 Views
Down to push rods and control horns....and I'm going to add the red and blue stripes to the stab to match the wing.....but I like it !!!!!

Edit note....I added the stripes to the stab.......
Posted by GonzoBorinquen | Dec 04, 2021 @ 09:37 AM | 35,726 Views
Had a fun day last wednesday 11/24/21, with my friends at our Club Borinquen RC in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. One of my friends prepared the attached video of the day flights and sent it to me on my birthday last 12/2/21.

Even thou I am 69 years old (you are only "69" once), I love Rock specially Gun's & Roses, Rafa prepared the video with 2nd section with one of their signature tones. I really appreciate him for many things and this is just one more.

I love my A-1 Skyraider "Chona La Puerca Asesina", for its looks and flight characteristics. Hope to continue having birthdays sharing them with my wife, kids, friends and models.

Hope you enjoy Rafa's video of "Chona"

Gonzo

SKYRAIDER (8 min 41 sec)